26 November, 2020

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Creating Saints In The Catholic Church

By Shyamon Jayasinghe

Shyamon Jayasinghe

Shyamon Jayasinghe

Sri Lanka is about to welcome the new Pope, Francis. The current Pope deserves much respect for his modernity and progressiveness. The Catholic Church has long been outmoded as it had failed to meet the challenges that a changing society brings up. On central issues like birth control, aids and euthanasia the Church flopped, thereby increasing the woes of people rather than assuaging their ills. African Catholics, for instance have been subject to the cruel ravage of Aids in their communities mainly due to the Church banning safe sex devices like condoms. The theory peddled by the Church as justification is that sex is only for procreation and not fun and enjoyment. This view runs counter to all findings of modern biology, behavioral psychology and psychiatry. Yet, the Church headed by their Popes did not budge. On the other hand, Pope Francis Pope has been courageous to turn upside down many of these stupid and outworn ideas.

The current Pope has also shown an independence of mind to question many a doctrinal belief. He has announce new ideas about God etc. I think he must also think about the traditional practice of creating saints. The visit of Pope Francis to Sri Lanka is partly to create a Sri Lankan saint. We saw how his predecessor created an Australian saint. One wonders if this policy is a play to the gallery by pleasing the nationalistic instincts of people.

Pope Sri LankaI had an email from a Catholic in America that read as follows: “I am describing Canonization here: An act by which the Catholic Church declares a deceased person to be a saint, to be included in the canon, or list of recognized saints who are invoked by many (but not all Catholics) praying to God. It is a tedious process of scrutiny when his or her life is put under the microscope by a group–called the devil’s advocates arguing against him or her.”

I doubt the “tediousness” in the picking process. Looking at past history one gets a feel that there has been an air of nonchalance in creating saints. The Catholic Community Forum lists some 5120 saints created thus far over the years. If you go to the website of the American Catholic Organization you will find listed a massive array of saints. They are arbitrarily assigned expertise in different areas such as follows: Advertising: St Bernadine of Siena; Aids: St Peregrino Laziori;Air Travel: St Joseph of Cupertioni;Anesthetics: St Rene Goupil;Beekeepers: St Ambrose;Blacksmiths:St Dunstan;Blind: St Lucy;Cancer: St Peregrino Laziori;Deafness: St Francis De Sales;Disabled: St Giles; Epilepsi: St Vitus and Firefighters: St John of God. The list goes on and on and one wonders what this is all about.

All these saints are said to have intercessory power with God. Can any of us listen to three persons at a time? How could, then, a particular saint listen to the prayers of thousands from all over the globe expressed in diverse languages? Doesn’t this violate commonsense?

In creating this vast pantheon of mythology Catholicism becomes inadvertently polytheistic with diverse heavenly bodies including angels and saints (not to mention the special case of the Virgin Mary) floating around in heaven.

If the Catholic Church is to advance toward the 21st century its head, the Pope, must focus attention on cleaning up senseless doctrinal tenets and practices. Perpetuating these senseless beliefs only helps to encourage the spread of ignorance and irrationality.

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Latest comments

  • 8
    8

    Shyamon, it is evident from your brief foray that you have only a very limited and biased idea of this subject. A very little knowledge and you are generalizing.

    • 5
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      “In creating this vast pantheon of mythology Catholicism becomes inadvertently polytheistic with diverse heavenly bodies including angels and saints (not to mention the special case of the Virgin Mary) floating around in heaven.”

      Shows a clear lack of understanding, in fact total ignorance, about the basic teachings of the Catholic Church – Scripture, Divine Revelation, and Sacred Tradition, as interpreted by the Magisterium (teaching authority of The Church).

      Such ignorance is hard to correct through a website.

      But God’s salvation is open to all.

      A Student’s Prayer (by St. Thomas Aquinas) as follows may help.

      Come, Holy Spirit, Divine Creator, true source of light and fountain of wisdom! Pour forth your brilliance upon my dense intellect, dissipate the darkness which covers me, that of sin and of ignorance. Grant me a penetrating mind to understand, a retentive memory, method and ease in learning, the lucidity to comprehend, and abundant grace in expressing myself. Guide the beginning of my work, direct its progress, and bring it to successful completion. This I ask through Jesus Christ, true God and true man, living and reigning with You and the Father, forever and ever.

      Amen.

      • 7
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        “But God’s salvation is open to all”

        Salvation from what? please explain for an understanding? also to be a christian what one should believe? thanks

        • 0
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          Hi Sha,

          Briefly, Catholics (and Christians in general) believe that our sins are offences against the creator. These offences, because of who they are against – an infinitely good God – are impossible for humans to correct by themselves. We believe that Jesus Christ, who is God himself was born, lived, worked, died and rose again. Jesus being perfect, could, by his obedience, atone for our disobedience. We respond to this act of love by faith and love towards God and loving service to those around us.

      • 2
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        Unless you are blind, you have to admit that Catholicism as practiced today is a polytheistic religion.

        Any salvation in the hereafter?

    • 4
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      Shyamon Jayasinghe

      RE: Creating Saints In The Catholic Church

      Is there a Saints inflation In The Catholic Church?

      How do you figure out which Saint to focus on get the Miracles done?

      The Mahinda Rajapaksa Presidential astrologers Could have used some Sainrs, instead of depending on Planets.

    • 4
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      Shyamon Jayasinghe

      “In creating this vast pantheon of mythology Catholicism becomes inadvertently polytheistic with diverse heavenly bodies including angels and saints (not to mention the special case of the Virgin Mary) floating around in heaven.”

      Is the Catholic Church still stuck on the Geocentric Model? I was under the impression that Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton and Foucault put to an end to that model.

  • 6
    3

    In the first place, the Church never creates saint, she only declares that such and such a person is a saint. According to Catholic belief holiness is a gift from God and all are called to respond to this universal call. Catholic teaching on this can be found in the Second Vatican council Dogmatic constitution on the church Lumen Gentium. “All the faithful of Christ of whatever rank or status, are called to the fullness of the Christian life and to the perfection of charity; by this holiness as such a more human manner of living is promoted in this earthly society. In order that the faithful may reach this perfection, they must use their strength accordingly as they have received it, as a gift from Christ. They must follow in His footsteps and conform themselves to His image seeking the will of the Father in all things. They must devote themselves with all their being to the glory of God and the service of their neighbor. In this way, the holiness of the People of God will grow into an abundant harvest of good, as is admirably shown by the life of so many saints in Church history.” (Lumen Gentium Chapter 5, verse 40).
    When you write on matters of the Church it is always good to place it against its official teachings and the Scriptures rather than on one’s personal speculations. Its pity, that your only reference is an email from your friend whose authority on the matter is not known to the readers. It is only a personal opinion. You only highlight the intercessory function of a saint. They are primarily declared so by the Church as an example and an inspiration for the rest of the faithful. Saints are witness that call to holiness offered by God is not something hanging in the air but it can be lived out, no matter what type of person you are. Hence there is a multitude of saints. Among them there are kings and queens, beggars and nobles, slaves, thieves and murders. None of them is born a saint. At a particular time in their life they felt God’s call are responded to it especially by loving and serving their fellow human beings. They had their own struggles both internal and external and they did not give up or give in. this is what the Church wants to admire in them. If the world could honour Mother Theresa Noble Prize for her service, why can’t the Church recognize her saintly life for the poorest of the poor? Assigning different areas to saints is matter of popular belief. Each area had its own significance in the life of a particular saint. It may be even the medium through which he/she brought love and compassion to the lives of people. For example St. Francis is the patron saint of ecology. In the 13th century there was no study of ecology or any serious environmental concerns. Yet in the life of Saint Francis we see that he looks at creation as a manifestation of God’s love and he extended “love of neighbour” even to the animals, trees and entire creation. Isn’t that an eye-opener to the modern day man?
    You refer to pantheon of mythology. Saints are not myths but real people of flesh and blood like you and me. What is so special in them is that they rose above that flesh and blood by relying on the Spirit of the Lord. The Church never advocates worship of saints but rather she encourages her faithful to honour them. It’s only a devotion and not a worship.

  • 8
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    Thank you Opes Dei, Aela and Jude.
    Whether the Church “creates” a saint or “declares” a saint makes no difference.
    I need not look at this issue from the point of view of any scripture. I am analysing it as a rational being using commonsense.A scripture that conflicts with evidence and commonsense must be rejected. Church does more than encourage (Jude);it opens its doors to pray for favours from saints. This implies that a saint can intercede with God to grant favours. Jude, you must be praying to St Jude, surely. What for? merely to honour? Go to the All Saints Church in Borella and you will find people praying their heart out. Go to St Anthony’s Kotahena and you will see poor folk praying while rolling in the ground.

    • 0
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      It is not commonsense that praying is irrational…

  • 7
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    Mr Jaysinghe

    Ignorance is evil. It masquerades as brilliant, rational knowlege, And worst of all, it breeds itself.

    Your sentence “I need not look at this issue from the point of view of any scripture” demonstrates this.

    Would you try to criticise, discuss or comment on Buddhism without taking some time off to read Buddha’s word before doing any of those things?

    I rest my case. The answers are in the Scriptures and read before throwing stones.

    It is never too late for the prayer I quoted above. God can help, believe me.

  • 7
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    Well said, Jude. Rightly has it been said that a little learning is a dangerous thing! SJ should take the trouble to inform himself correctly about these matters before rushing to make silly comments. He’ll do well to stick to commenting on matters political.

  • 3
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    May I know with what authority you pass judgement on what is ‘rational’ and what is ‘myth’? If a Catholic chooses to believe in something and that faith betters his emotional state of mind, be it praying for the intercession of a Saint or treating sequel intimacy and something more sacred and important than a good ol’ fun romp, what is it to you? How does it harm you or anyone else of a different viewpoint when it doesn’t force you to follow that same belief against your will? Each of us has a right to follow or not follow the teachings of doctrine or one’s church. If you don’t agree, you are under no obligation to comply, but please don’t be so judgemental. Live and let live.

  • 2
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    On the Feast of All Saints, Pope Francis stressed that the saints are not “supermen” who are “born perfect,” but rather are ordinary people who followed God “with all their heart.”

    “They are like us, they are like each of us, they are people who before reaching the glory of heaven lived a normal life, with joys and griefs, struggles and hopes,” the Pope said before the noontime Angelus prayer in St. Peter’s Square Nov. 1.

    Each saint changed his or her life “when they recognized the love of God, they followed him with all their heart, without conditions and hypocrisies.”

    “They spent their lives in the service of others, they endured suffering and adversity without hatred and responded to evil with good, spreading joy and peace,” he said.

    “Sanctity is beautiful! It is a beautiful way!” Pope Francis stressed. “The saints give us a message. They tell us: be faithful to the Lord, because the Lord does not disappoint! He does not disappoint ever, and he is a good friend always at our side.”

    The Pope emphasized that everyone can be a saint.

    “To be a saint is not a privilege of a few… all of us in baptism have the inheritance of being able to become saints. Sanctity is a vocation for everyone.”

    “All of us are called to walk in the way of sanctity, and this way has a name, a face: the face of Jesus Christ.

    Pope Francis said the Feast of All Saints “reminds us that the goal of our existence is not death, it is paradise!”

    “The saints, the friends of God, assure us that this promise does not disappoint,” he added. “In their earthly existence, in fact, they had lived in profound communion with God. In the smallest and most despised faces of their brothers, they saw the face of God, and now they contemplate him face to face in his glorious beauty.”

    The saints show joy and love, he said.

    “The saints are men and women who have joy in their hearts and spread it to others. Never hating, but serving the other, is the greatest need. To pray and to live in joy: this is the way of sanctity!”

    The saints do not “place conditions” on God, the Pope explained. In addition, they “are not violent but merciful and they seek to be makers of reconciliation and peace.”

    “The saints never have hated,” the Pope added. “Understand this well: Love is of God, but where does hatred come from? Hatred does not come from God, but from the devil!”

    Pope Francis said the Kingdom of Heaven is for those who trust in the love of God and do not put their security in material things. It is for those with humility and a “simple heart” who do not judge others. The Kingdom of Heaven is for “those who suffer with the one who suffers and rejoice with the one who rejoices.”

    The saints are also a source of fortitude and hope, he noted.

    “The saints encourage us with their witness not to have fear of going against the current or fear of being misunderstood and derided when we speak of the Lord and of the Gospel,” the Pope said. “They show us with their lives that the one who remains faithful to God and to his words experiences now on this earth the comfort of his love and then experiences it a ‘hundredfold’ in eternity.”

    After the Angelus prayer, the Pope voiced special prayers for the victims of violence, especially Christians who have lost their lives because of persecution. He also prayed for those men, women and children who have died because of hunger and thirst.

  • 5
    2

    Tut… Tut… me thinks Mr Jayasinghe is perhaps one of those former catholics, who now thank God daily that he has been set free from the “heresies of the Catholic Church” because finally some evangelical has shown him the light. Thank God for those who remain faithful to the Catholic church, who genuinely thirst to know what the faith teaches us and those who discover the fullness of faith in the Catholic Church. I have crossed quite a few of those ” born agains” who ridicule me for my beliefs. I find it pointless trying to have even a friendly debate with them because they are so brainwashed and hell bent on saving me from the fires of hell, that they turn a deaf ear to anything I might have to say. So in this instance too, I will refrain from going further, except to say, may the Saints in heaven pray for Mr Jayasinghe. And I shall pray too, even though I am not a saint…..as yet :)

  • 4
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    Man and all other living beings on this planet are products of conversion of sun’s radiant energy, a very small portion of which falls on it.
    Man evolved out of this maelstrom and ultimately diversified.
    Now humans are divided by necessity of survival.
    This has led to many divisions and beleifs among them.
    All of us, who return to the universe in molecules on death, spend a lot of energy on disagreement and even on mass annihilation.
    We need tolerance of beleifs of the diverse groups called religions, sects etc.
    I respect the Pope as a man who preaches tolerance and peace.
    He does not impose his doctrinal beleifs on persons other than roman catholics.
    Only those who practise their religions 100% should criticise others.

    • 6
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      We pray for Mr Jayasinghe

  • 2
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    The Pope is a head of a mono religious nation. Where is the diversity there? What a farce.

    • 1
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      Vatican City is not a nation in the traditional sense. It is a city-state specifically created for the Catholic hierarchy, the Vatican.

      If you want to make a comparison, compare Italy to Sri Lanka.

  • 1
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    Freedom of Speech and conscience does not restrict one’s ability criticise RELIGIONS of WORLD VIEWS of individuals or groups of individuals or groups of groups.

    “Only those who practise their religions 100% should criticise others”..

    THIS IS A NON-SENSE statement. So according to this Jihadist Islam or induced conversions to GOD based religions can not be critcised. What a lot of non-sense.

    The fact is in the western or in areas with developed minds Christianity and other god based religions are on the decline. Buddhism is on the increase.

    In Asian countries where people are struggling for daily existence the GOD based religions are MARKETED. (This is christianity and islam)…

    This is a FACT..You can do your OWN research and find it out.

    You will find that Buddhism in it’s purest form WILL stand the test of time and space.

  • 0
    0

    Cardinal Thomas Cooray is the one who should be canonized as the saint for Sri Lanka. Joseph Vaz is not even from Sri Lanka.

    Unlike gods (who we can’t be sure of), saints are people who actually lived on the earth who people knew.These saints have some Buddhistic (Mayahana) holy telelink with living creatures.

    • 1
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      I would say Rev. Father His Most Holiness Matthew Peries from Borella deserves to be cannonized before Vaz and Cooray.

  • 0
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    Many Catholics are annoyed by Shyamon’s analysis. They say Shyamon is ignorant. Ignorant of what? Their scriptures. I can see SJ’s point very clearly as he is subjecting scripture to a rational examination. How can a doctrine survive against reason and commonsense? That is what SJ says.Many past scriptures failed against reason and commonsense experience and are now abandoned. One such thing is that the earth was built in 7 days and that the humans, animals, birds etc we have today were all created within that period. Darwinian evolution by natural selection has busted that false scripture. Again,the scriptures stated that the earth was the centre of the universe. This was busted by Galileo etc. So many others I can point out.

    • 4
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      “Darwinian evolution by natural selection has busted that false scripture.”

      More evidence of the “vicious circle” of ignorance blinding people to the truth.

      PV’s above statement “assumes” that natural selection has “busted” Scriptures.

      Alas, natural selection does not answer the “beginnings” of life on earth in any way. If he assumes that, the questions “who caused natural selection?” or “how did that happen?” needs to be answered. Natural Selection, at best, tries to explain how life adapts to different environments. It does nothing to explain the “origin” of life.

      Darwin was a frustrated Jew who lost faith due to the death of his many children in young age. Even with that, he was not confident of denying God until Alfred Russel Wallace forced the publication of what he had written.

      You need more blind faith to believe in that rubbish, than you would ever need to believe in the Intelligent Design of life and the universe.

      OPEN YOUR EYES VIDYARATNE!

      • 0
        1

        Darwin wasn’t Jewish.

        You are using technology that was created by science, not by religion and yet you disregard science and promote unscientific ideals , like religion and its claim of supernatural intervention.

        If you are soo sure of your rightness then give up modern technology.

        • 0
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          Actually, science and technology owes quite a bit to the monks of early medieval Europe who preserves knowledge in their monasteries when all around them anarchy descended after the fall of the Roman Empire. And also to the Catholics of the late medieval Europe who founded the university system and the scientific method. And to the Muslim scholars to whom we owe algebra and other things we take for granted now.

          • 0
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            Monks preserving knowledge does not substantiate the supernatural claims of religion . Monks/Catholics coming up with discoveries did so using scientific methods, they did not get the discoveries or inventions from Jesus or god.

            The so called Muslim discoveries were from non Muslims cultures who were converted to Islam. So Islam then ends up taking the credit for the discoveries of the people it conquered.

            Religion/GOD does not give us inventions and discoveries, people who identify with a certain religion used observation and human ingenuity to discover and invent.

            • 0
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              Yes I know that the progresses in science during the Middle Ages did not come directly from God. My point is that there isn’t, as you imply, a dichotomy/opposition between faith and science. The Christian culture of Medieval Europe was a fertile ground for the flourishing of science.

              • 1
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                There is friction when one tries to put religion on the same footing as Science.

                • 0
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                  No there isn’t. Throughout the centuries, right up to today, great minds and honest thinkers have done exactly that with no friction at all.

    • 1
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      Religious people get angry when their made up nonsense is called to prove itself.

      Some people genuinely believe in the nonsense but too many are secretly non believers but profess their faith only because they find religion a useful tool for power and influence.

    • 1
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      The Catholic Church never taught that the universe was created in 7 days and never had a problem with Darwinian evolution. The Church also didn’t have a problem when Copernicus theorized that the earth was not the centre of the solar system. They did react badly to Galileo because Galileo was teaching as fact something that he couldn’t prove (it took a while more for Kepler to mathematically prove the heliocentric model). Galileo was also a bit of a jerk and insulted the pope. That’s what got him busted.

      By the way I think what Catholics are annoyed at here is not that Shyamon Jayasinghe is ignorant about scripture. The problem is that he’s mocking something he doesn’t understand and hasn’t bothered to even try to understand. You can disagree with someone, who can think he’s very. But at least have the intellectual courage to hear him out and see what he really believes in.

  • 2
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    Shyamon is speaking from a position of a confirmed aetheist. As a Catholic or rather a follower of Christ, I can agree with his comments on canonisation. With regard to the use or non use of condoms and role of sex, it is upto the individuals to see light regardless of what the Church (which is not the religion or science) says.

    Looks like eventually the Church will have to concede the use of condoms as a legitimate ploy to have a healthy life and essential for a happy marriage.

    The trouble is that most of the people use religion merely as an adornment or a cover for their life style and for social activities. Confirmed aetheists such as Shyamon can easily see the deception in the institutionalised religions. I have read Shyamon’s previous postings on the concepts such as Karma and rebirth etc which is very consistent with the confirmed aetheists’ view (and science) as in the case of his views of canonisation: MJA

  • 0
    1

    The believers in Christianity and God in this forum have not seen the following assertion by SJ in his impressive article:
    “All these saints are said to have intercessory power with God. Can any of us listen to three persons at a time? How could, then, a particular saint listen to the prayers of thousands from all over the globe expressed in diverse languages? Doesn’t this violate commonsense?”
    Can any of you believers who are now busy praying for SJ’s soul respond to this firm argument? I will give you $1000.00 dollars

  • 0
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    ” If the Catholic Church is to advance toward the 21st century its head, the Pope, must focus attention on cleaning up senseless doctrinal tenets and practices. Perpetuating these senseless beliefs only helps to encourage the spread of ignorance and irrationality. “

    Fully agree. Pope has proffered Sainthood on Joseph Vaz; now multitudes of Sri Lankan Catholics will pray to Vaz.

    Irrationality , superstition and religious brainwashing is the primary bane of South Asia. Hundreds of millions have died , been abused and exploited over millennia by Mullahs,Imams,Swamis,Clerics and Hindu Priests.

    Sri Lanka can not progress when soo many of the masses are deceived and lied to by religious establishment. Europe advanced because of the enlightenment. Critical thinking and rationality is sorely needed to stop the poor masses from being exploited and deceived.

    The current Pope is a good person because he is truly supporting progressive ideals, so I am not critiquing him but am critiquing those who take an antagonistic towards educating the public to understand religion with its supernatural claims is irrational and defies commonsense and science.

    Thank You for this article Shyamon Jayasinge

    • 1
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      ‘Hundreds of millions have died , been abused and exploited over millennia by Mullahs,Imams,Swamis,Clerics and Hindu Priests.’

      Countless millions more have died in the name of progress, revolution, and the atheistic state…

      • 1
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        So what’s your point, that because people died in revolutions and under communism it somehow nullifies deaths from religion?

        Revolutions also involved religion and still do.

        Atleast the people who killed under the banner of Communism did not use the excuse that their deeds were sanctioned by god. Religious butchers are by far the worst because they are the most dishonest since they try to legitimize their quest for power and dominance with religion.

        • 0
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          ‘So what’s your point, that because people died in revolutions and under communism it somehow nullifies deaths from religion?’
          Nope that’s not my point. My point is that human beings can be violent and they often ideals are used to ground this violence. Religion is one such idol – and many deaths have occurred because of this. Progress is another such ideal and many more deaths have occurred in the name of this. You seem to imply that only religion encounters the problem of deceit and violence – and that’s very inaccurate.

          And I don’t see why religious killers are “by far” the worst. It’s just as bad to murder in the name of progress and the Enlightenment (Mao and the French Revolution, for example) as it is to murder in the name of God.

          • 0
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            I agree that religion is used as a cover by groups and persons seeking power and domination.

            Religious killers are the worst because they are being dishonest in trying to legitimize their violence as divinely ordained. Communists or other self proclaimed non-theists are honest in proclaiming their ideological motive for violence, they are not lying by invoking god.

            • 0
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              They lie and invoke other things: like progress, the welfare of the workers, etc.

  • 1
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    Everything revolves around the belief in creator and omnipresent God. This belief embedded from childhood in your mind will be a red herring to see the real thing. I fully endorse Shaymon’s point of view.

  • 0
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    Goodness this is a poorly written article. The author rants about the various errors of the Catholic Church without bothering to even try and understand what the Church really believes and teaches.

    A few hints:
    The Church doesn’t teach that sex is only for procreation and not for pleasure.
    The one success story in Africa’s fight against AIDS – Uganada – dramatically reduced AIDS infection for a programme of abstinence education.

    A saint is someone that the Church says is worthy of imitation, someone who has lived this life well and is now in heaven and who prays for us on earth. I think the number the author quotes is an understatement. But given that the Church has been around for two millennia, the comparatively small number of canonized saints does indicate a great deal of rigour (a rigour the author would do well to emulate)

    The author snidely comments: ‘The list goes on and on and one wonders what this is all about.’ One needn’t wonder so much. Just google ‘patron saints’ and one would realise that those aren’t areas of expertise.

    ‘All these saints are said to have intercessory power with God. Can any of us listen to three persons at a time? How could, then, a particular saint listen to the prayers of thousands from all over the globe expressed in diverse languages? Doesn’t this violate commonsense?’
    Common sense would dictate that an institution that has produced brilliant philosophers, theologians and scientists would have thought about this little problem this some time ago. A bit of research would confirm that.

    The author would embarrass himself much less if he did a bit to dispell his own ignorance about the beliefs of the people he considers ignorant and irrational.

  • 0
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    Shyam’s article is an excellent example in dealing with the problem as to how to identify between free speech and hate speech. He is entitled to view things rationally. But expression of the same would amount to intruding into the sensitivities of other religions. (Boy! if we try to view things rationally about another well known religion then there would some decree or fatwa issued by some country authorizing anybody to take the life of the disbeliever!)

    Our top priority is to bring in harmony, both ethnic and religious. In that context we have to be mindful of the concept of mutual respect.

  • 0
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    This wont help the brainwashed, ignorant men who follow out dated scripts, but I will try http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvtJja2ihYQ

  • 0
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    I like to refer to the comment by ‘Good Governance.’ I don’t see why religious issues should not be examined and critiqued in public.Religions make assertions about the universe and man. These are subjects pertaining to the province of scientific enquiry. For instance, that the earth was created by God in seven days. The origin of the earth is a subject of science and when religion encroaches on this one has a right to query. We hold a particular scientific hypothesis in doubt until we find evidence. Why let religions free of examination when we don’t do that for science?
    S

    • 0
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      It is a critique that leads to a debate, dispute amounting to hate and finally violence. So critique should be confined amongst persons who will accept the critique in good faith, engage in replies, again done in good faith. The result of the discussion would naturally be very interesting and intellectually stimulating.

      However, when it comes to religion or ethnic customs, where there is an element of belief and clinging on to the same with one’s heart and soul, the story is different. Chances are that it is taken badly and can result in public disorder. As I told before, it can be fatwa of some less known country to do away with the life of the disbeleiver (Salaman Rushdie for example).The top priority of this country is harmony amongst its citizens. So let the citizens engage in religious activities unhindered by others. Lets learn to respect the religious beliefs of others, however hillarious to rationalists like Shyam and myself.

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