25 October, 2020

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Is The Samapura Coal-Power Generator Necessary?

By Chandre Dharmawardana

Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana

Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana

Kumar David, well-known columnist and past Professor of Electrical Engineering in Hong Kong has come forward to defend the controversial coal-power installation which has become a thorn of controversy (May 8, Colombo Telegraph). The ancient name of the city itself (saama-pura, the “city of Peace”), has been long forgotten; it has been a place where blue murder has been committed by both sides in the name of ethnic nationalism. It was here that a French NGO abandoned its local recruites to face the wrath of the tigers and the cross-fire from the government forces. So, let us forget the “saama” part and look at this sheer bone of contention, even when it comes to installing a power plant.

The country is badly in need of power, (just as it is short of a lot of other things, or even honest politicians!). So, are we to please various foreign vendors and their local agents by purchasing the Indian coal-power plant (50 MW), or the Japanese coal-power plant (1200 MW) plant, and accept the environmental degradation and increased mortality rates, as well as the need to ship coal from those vendors for many years to come? Or, do we try to push for a more sensible approach? Professor Kumar David argues that we have no other alternative, and that other proposals are all wooly eyed and impractical. He says that we don’t have enough sunlight hours, and enough empty land area to house solar plants. He seems to suggest that Dendro power (burning biomass), wind etc., are all still mere ‘pie in the sky’ ideas in the minds of “renewable energy evangelicals”. Clearly, Professor David considers this also to be “a revolution that will not happen” in our time, or that it is another “un-winnable war”?

Let us just go across the Palk Straits to Cochin, India, where the climate, sunlight effluence etc., are very similar to those of Sri Lanka. We have the following report”, “Eyeing to generate one lakh MW solar power in the country, Ministry of Civil Aviation (India) has decided to establish solar power plants at all airports. As a part of the programme, already 12-MW solar power plant was established at Cochin International Airport and the entire airport is operated on solar power at present …Speaking at a programme on Sunday, Civil Aviation minister P Ashok Gajapathi Raju said that already a 5-MW solar power plant was set up at New Delhi airport (Indian Express, 8-May-2016)”.

India is slowly coming to its senses after having already done much damage to itself with its many coal-power plants. Many Tamil-Nadu coal-powered plants are in the vicinity of Sri Lanka. Nearly fifty coal-fired power stations along the coast of Tamil Nadu spew out metal toxins and particulate gases, brought southwards by the trade winds and monsoons. Some 1,15,000 premature deaths in India result from pollution due to coal-fired generators (Hindu, March 11, 2013). This number is much more than the deaths from kidney disease in the Rajarata. The environmental impact of Indian power plants on Sri lanka is unknown and it is urgent that those who talk of a “toxin-free nation” should immediately study it. The fact that these coal-power plants are across the ocean is irrelevant as some of them are closer than Colombo is to Jaffna.

Both organic and “inorganic” agriculture, as well as attempts for healthy living will be smothered by over-arching pollution from the Indian coal-fired generators, as well as from the ubiquitous pollution from petroleum fumes and other petro-chemicals produced by the ever-increasing number of motor vehicules on the roads. All these are class-I carcinogens (i.e., you definitely get cancer on exposure to them, besides getting a whole host of other illnesses and allergies). Class-II carcinogens may give cancer at very high doses and long exposures. For instance, a dose of up to 8 tea spoons per day of glyphosate may be safely ingested by a 70 kg individual, according the the relevant European occupational health authority. However, yielding to fear-mongering, the Sri Lankan government has banned Glyphosate, one of the least dangerous substances in the group of class-II carcinogens, while leaving most class-I carcinogens and all other class-II carcinogens untouched. The plan to install more coal capacity while talking of a “toxin-free agriculture” is sheer hypocrisy.

Prof. David’s worry about there not being enough free surface area to position solar panels suggests that he needs to look up, and notice all the roof tops of building, hotels, hospitals, schools etc., that can be used. Architects should mandatorily include solar paneling in every new building or house just as they put in flooring and electric wiring in any building. The money allocated for coal-fired power plants should be used as a fund to subsidize such ventures through bank loans and subsidies.

Even northern countries like Germany, which has less sun than Sri Lanka have gone in a big way for Solar energy. France relies on nuclear generators for nearly 80% of its needs and has shaken off the need for polluting fuels.

Of course, at present most of the electricity demand in Sri Lanka is during the night. But with enough solar panels, people will use electricity for air-conditioning, and the peak period will shift to daytime.

Increasing industrialization as well as the use of electricity for rail transport will also shift the peak hours to daytime. In any case, excess day-time electricity production can be used to even pump back water into reservoirs as a means of storing energy for use at other times. However, the CEB is a slow and inefficient beast, possibly riddled with the usual ills of corruption and mismanagement. Perhaps Professor David knows more about such matters. However, the CBC has still not given (as far as I know) a tariff figure for the purchase of electricity from private individuals, although some credit is given in terms of banking any net electricity units generated by a private owner.

Even in the area of Dendro electricity production, it is the CBE that seems to be the slowest link. I have heard of at least two cases of 10 MW Dendro power plants (private sector) that were ready to be hooked up during the 2011-2012 period, but the CBE was not ready with their substations! Dendro power and other “bio-mass” power sources are “carbon nuetral”, in the sense that they put back to the environment just the carbon that was absorbed when the plants (e.g. Gircidia) grew.

There are some who think that our troubles will be over when the gas deposits in the Sri Lankan seas begin to be tapped. I would argue that the nations troubles will escalate to the maximum if the gas is tapped. Furthermore, the environmental impact on the topical marine ecology cannot even be assessed at this stage. All the international vultures will be upon the gas, and Sri Lanka will be like Nigeria, rich in fuel and run by foreign multinationals, while the people remain poor. They will be deliberately kept poor by those who exploit the gas.

Prof. David has is no novice to politics. In fact, I first knew him as an ardant engineering-faculty LSSP activist. So, when he says “It need not be at Sampur, it can be elsewhere”, he is forgetting that locating it right near Gokarna (Trincomalee) is essential to the Indians. Their bid to control the port of Trincomalee will be further strengthened by their control over the power supply to the region. Once the Indians get the politically naive Sri Lankans to build the bridge over Rama-Setu (Adams bridge), a direct railway line will connect the strategic port to India. Both Colombo hegemonists and Jaffna hegemonists will in the end find that they have been taken over by the big brother from the North. Mr. Wickremesinghe may think that this will weaken the hand of the Northern Provincial Council to a mere milli-volt, but he too will be nothing but a powerless spark from a Wimshurst machine. So, I am sure the Indians want the power-plant in this very strategic location for much more than selling coal.

So, Prof. David is quite mistaken when he believes that moving away from coal-fired power plants is NOT a practical possibility available right now. It is not , by any means some sort of “pie in the sky idea” of alternative-energy evangelists.

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Latest comments

  • 0
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    Here is what is said about sampur in the web-page on place-names by Dharmawardana.
    There is nothing about Dutch maps in it.
    :

    Sampur, Sampoor, Champoor (Sirigonakanda [Trincomalee ])
    SOMAPURA, SAMAPURA (anchor: Somapura))
    Ancient Buddhist archeological site, and a modern Hindu site of the Paththirakali Amman Temple.
    In Tamil ‘champu’ could be ‘bulrush (elephant grass)’, ‘Jambu’ fruit, or ‘jackal’ (c.f., jambuka). That a very old city with a history could be named after some reeds etc., is not too likely. Another meaning which has accrued to Tamil from Sanskrit/Prakrit sources is ‘champu ←sampu (p 3885,Madras Tamil Lexicon), i.e., calm or ‘saamam’. This agrees with the Pali/Prakrit/Sinhala usage in this place name. Soma (=Savumya) and “Samaa” are also, thus closely related in meaning. It has been claimed that the name “saamapura” is found in the Vanni Rajavaliya. However, according to Prof. Suraweera, it is not a very reliable text.

    Etymology of “Ur”, or “oor” found in “poor” and “pura”
    The stub ‘oor’ ← (p)oor ← ‘pura’ is a name for a city or town not only in indic languages, but also in Sumarian and Babylonian times. Sumarian was the main world lanaguage for some 30 centuries or more in the ancient world. The Silk road ran from the East to West, as well as North to south (all the way to Lanka), to cross in Benares, becoming the most important carrefour of the Ancient world. Many teachers including the Buddha chose Benares to disseminate their teachings to the world.
    The word “Ur” may have come to India via the Silk route from Asia Minor through the Indus valley, and then moved down along the North-South silk route to be absorbed into south Indian (i.e., Dravidian) languages, not only in the form “Ur”, but also in the form “pur”, “pura” etc. Sometimes in Dravidian languages, a vowel is added in front of “pur” to make “appur” etc. This is clearly after the rules set by the Tolkappian, a Sangcam grammar which follows Panini’s Grammar. It also appears in Western (“Indo-European”) languages in various guises. Thus “Ur” in “Urban”, Burg where we should note that “b” and “p” often exchange phonetically, and such a P occurs in p”ur”. The word “Borough” is also associated with “Burg” which is pronounced “berg”.
    However, many Tamil nationalist make the claim that Tamil came long before Suamrian, although most scholars believe that Tamil as an identifiable linguistic form came with the sangam period!

    Coal-power project at Samapura, 2011 report.
    Battle of Samapura, The Hindu, Sept.5, 2006
    Battle of Sampur, Lanka e-news
    GDA Perera’s article

    සාමපුර සෝමපුර

    • 1
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      [Etymology of “Ur”, or “oor” found in “poor” and “pura” The stub ‘oor’ ← (p)oor ← ‘pura’ is a name for a city or town not only in indic languages, but also in Sumarian and Babylonian times.]

      Etymology of Ur and Pura(m) are totally different.

      (உர்)(to assemble, join) -> உறு – உறை – உறையுள்.

      உல் (ul) – (உர்)(ur) – ஊர் (ūr).

      புரம்: புரி (puri) + அம் (am) (suffix for language and area (Tulu as Tuluvam, Tamil as Tamilam (in Telugu)

      புரிதல்(to bend, to surround, to circle) = வளைதல்.

      புரி (puri) spire. புரம்=கோட்டை. வளைந்திருப்பது, தொழிலாகு பெயர்.

      compare கோட்டம் from கோடு (kōṭu)(to bend, to surround) = வளை.

      கோடு (kōṭu) + அம் (am) = கோட்டம்(kōṭṭam)

      கோடு (kōṭu) + ஐ (Ai) = கோட்டை (kōṭṭai)

      In Ancient days, people were lived in towns/cities-surrounded by Fort, castle. Therefore it is called as Puram.

      புரம் (puram) – borough, berg, burgh – Edinburgh.

      புரி (puri) – bery, pury, bury – Canterbury

      http://www.tamilvu.org/slet/lA100/lA100pd4.jsp?bookid=200&pno=20

      http://www.tamilvu.org/slet/lA110/lA110pd1.jsp?bookid=255&pno=3

      ஊர் (ūr)is not derived from புரம் (puram). Even linguists/Etymologists never claimed so.

      ஊர் (ūr)and புரம் (puram) are pure Tamil words only.

      • 0
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        Are u a telugu in andhra or TN?

        • 0
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          I am Indian.

    • 0
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      [Sometimes in Dravidian languages, a vowel is added in front of “pur” to make “appur” etc. This is clearly after the rules set by the Tolkappian, a Sangcam grammar which follows Panini’s Grammar.]

      Incorrect statement and there is no such grammar rule. Appur is the combination of Appu + ūr -> Appūr அப்பூர் in Tamil Nadu. it is not appur but Appūr.

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      Sumathipala

      “However, many Tamil nationalist make the claim that Tamil came long before Suamrian”

      Didn’t you know the first ape spoke Tamil?

      However, Champika Ranawake believes the first ape not only spoke Sinhala but practiced Buddhism before the birth of Buddha and discovered zero.

  • 1
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    I have not heard of any breakthrough or improvement in solar cell technology to obtain the kind of happy and abundant energy as Jaliya hypes. He appears to be joking by copy pasting marketing jargon from internet marketing tools. However, the world must strive to achieve the kind of energy from solar cells as Jaliya talks of. I agree with him it is the best source of energy we have if it successfully utilized. I would like to propose to researchers to focus, in addition to roof tops of various buildings, on hybrid systems located along coast line where wind, solar, sea level rise and fall forces are harnessed to generate multi-source power coupled with diesel generators which will be easy to manage cost effectively. Another potential location would be the place where rivers meet the sea: vast volume of water flows to the sea with intrinsic energy and if a suitable turbine can be devised to enhance and utilize this free flowing energy it will contribute to the overall power supply scheme of the country. It is very important that power generation is planned as part of an overall power generation and consumption process where efficiency of usage is maximized by adopting state of the art technologies like LED lighting, efficient motors, efficient mechanisms, efficient building designs, efficient transportation systems, building infrastructure to encourage more foot cycles, minimize power wastage etc. R&D must be adequately encouraged and facilitated to find new innovations. Biomass and waste generated power must be adopted too. It is through a combination of all these and yet to be discovered sources that we have to fulfil our power requirement. The lesser the fossil fuel and more and more renewable energy the better should be the motto.

  • 7
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    Very similar to what that crackpot racist Professor Nalin Silva used to write, Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana also used to write racist articles under the pet name Gamvasiya. Reading Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana’s (another Natural Scientist like Nalin Silva and NOT a Social Scientist) racist articles is just like reading another article of Prof. Nalin Silva.

    Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana (a Chemistry-Physics researcher) is not an etymologist or a linguist and neither is he a Tamil/Sinhala or Sanskrit/Pali scholar who has done research in the Tamil, Sinhala, Sanskrit and Pali languages. All what he has done in his website is his own creation or assumptions. His biased research on place names with hypothetical assumptions/interpretations or un-authoritative/officially un-published, half-baked work can never be considered as facts. These people can speculate or create anything and write glamorized articles to convince a few confused and misguided individuals but calling them ‘FACTS’ is simply ridiculous.

    Contemporary Sri Lanka has place names which contain roots derived from Pali, Sanskrit, Sinhala, Tamil, Malayalam, and Telugu names. Some twisted/misspelled names are due to the inability of the Europeans to accurately sound a local name. Simply by looking at a Dutch map with twisted/misspelled names and then turning it in favor of the Sinhalese, Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana is coming to conclusion that they are all Sinhala names. To understand why the Dutch twisted/misspelled these words, one must analyse the 17th century Dutch language before coming to such controversial assumptions and conclusions. One reason for this may be that the 17th century Dutch language did not have the proper phonemes to denote the voiced grapheme of Tamil/Sinhala words/languages. How long is he going to fool the Sinhalese with his twisted assumptions?

    • 5
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      Regarding the place names in North East, the self-proclaimed Tamil/Sinhala language specialist Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana is trying to say that the names in NE were not Tamil but Sinhala.

      Even though the Sinhala Language was created in Sri Lanka using Sanskrit, Pali and Tamil, both Sinhala and Tamil languages have its origin in India, and both of them have many similar or identical words. More than 30% of the Sinhala vocabulary consists of Tamil words.

      Sinhala names are not unique to Sri Lanka, if you travel around India (from North to South and East to West), you can find 80% of the Sinhala names with a very slight variation.

      Some of the crocked 20th century Sinhala Buddhist pseudo history scholars took full advantage of the similarity between the two languages to play with words by twisting, turning, corrupting and creating very similar Sinhala names to convince the ignorant gullible Sinhala Buddhist majority that the original names were from Sinhala origin which the Tamils changed later.

      If not for their own creation, I wonder from where they got those names what they claim? It is neither from any ancient stone inscriptions nor from that infamous Mahawamsa?

      The Old Tamil names found in Northeast was existing for many centuries and most of them have a clear meaning in Tamil and is unique to the traditional Tamil areas.

      • 6
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        If you travel around India (from North to South and East to West), you can see many names ending with -pur, -puri, -pura, -puram, etc. It is Sanskrit referring to a town or city.

        ‘Pur’ originated from the Sanskrit word ‘purna’ which means ‘complete’. Pur means a settlement or a town. E.g., Kanpur, Laharpur, Phulpur, & Puranpur (in Uttar Pradesh), Jabalpur, Maharajpur, Pithampur, & Shajapur (in Madhya Pradesh), Bharatpur, Jaipur, Jodhpur, & Sri Madhopur (in Rajasthan), Vijayapur & Srinivaspur (in Karnataka), Gangarampur (in Bengal), Markapur (in Andhara Pradesh), Rajagangapur (in Odisha), Manipur and many more ‘Pur’in India.

        ‘Pura’ or ‘Puram’ means City. Kanakpura (in Bangalore), Mahalingapura, Vijayapura, Surapura, Sakaleshapura (in Karnataka), Madhepura (in Bihar), Malpura (in Rajasthan), Rajpura (in Punjab), Shahpura (in Rajasthan) and many more.

        Amalapuram, Narasapuram, Parvathipuram, Peddapuram, Pithapuram, Ramachandrapuram (in Andhara Pradesh), Thiruvananthapuram (in Kerala), Vikramasingapuram, Viluppuram, maamalapuram, Kanchipuram, Padmanabhapuram, Ramanathapuram (in Tamil Nadu) and so on.

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          Don’t say that to a Tamil. they would say, every thing came from Tamil.

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            jim softy dimwit

            “Don’t say that to a Tamil. they would say, every thing came from Tamil.”

            Including Buddhism, language, cinema, …….. Pattini Deiyo, …. your stupid gene, saree, …..

        • 8
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          Thanks KWG,

          With all these Indian names ending with ‘PUR’, ‘PURA’ and ‘PURAM’ I wonder what Prof. CD will do with them. He may even claim that the whole of India was once Sinhala. Actually even the Old Tamil names were ending with ‘PUR’ and ‘PURA’. Only a few centuries ago they changed into ‘PURAM’ after they introduced the ‘pulli (dot) system’ which is peculiar to Tamils in particular among the Indian languages whereby the words/names started ending with ‘n’ and ‘m’. Before that, the old Tamil names were very similar to those Sanskrit/Pali (presently Sinhala) names. That is why the Tamil Kings of Anuradhapura were known as Sena, Guttika, Elara, Pulahatha, Bahiya, Panayamara, Parinda, Dathiya, and so on.

          Even in Tamil Nadu, the names of the old kings were referred to as Kulothunga Chola, Vikrma Chola, Aditya Chola, Rajendra Deva Pandya, Kula Sekara Pandya, Chandra Sekara Pandya, Vira Wickrama Pandya, Parakrama Pandya, Sundara Pandya, and so on. If you remove the Pandya and Chola from their names they look and sound very similar to the present day Sinhala names. Prof. CD may even claim they were all Sinhalese.

        • 7
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          If Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana can play with Tamil/Sanskrit words by twisting, turning, corrupting and creating Sinhala names out of them as a HOBBY and then create a website, now he has plenty of names to play with and enjoy. He can create another website for India and try to convince the Indians that once upon a time they were all Sinhalese, but I am not sure if there are ignorant gullible fools in India like our (converted) Sinhala Buddhists Vibushana and sach who thinks there is nobody as knowledgeable (expert) as Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana when it comes to etymology (Sinhala/Tamil/Sanskrit/Pali). However, none of his publications are authentic, he cannot publish his work in a reputed journal. These are half-baked ‘scholars’ or rather pseudo linguists.

          I am wondering what Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana will do if someone takes him to North, East, West and South India and show him all those place names. It will be like putting a fox into a chicken’s cage, he will very happily twist, turn, corrupt and change them into Sinhala. This kind of jokers are mostly produced in Sri Lanka and the best part is, they also have enough followers. He can fool some Sinhalese but he can NEVER fool the Tamils with such hobbies.

          • 4
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            Celeo

            “I am wondering what Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana will do if someone takes him to North, East, West and South India and show him all those place names.”

            Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana has a great supporter in Modi BJP.

            The process has already started, BJP believes and insist Puranas are part of Hindian history and thought as such at University level.

            Safforanisation is not limited to this island.

            The real danger of this short term etymological conspiracy will have long term repercussions.

            The future generation of Sinhala people will end up with no history. The so called revisionist Sinhala/Buddhist historians are robbing/destroying Sinhala people of their history.

    • 0
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      what do you know ? you dont know even to differentiate between Parakramabahu 1 and 6

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        Not only Parakramabahu 1 and 6 but all the Parakrama Bahus were Tamils and continuation of the Pandyan Dynasty that ruled Sri Lanka.

  • 4
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    Please, all pardon me. I’m not a violent man and that kind, caring, loving and peaceful one. My intention was not to hurt or harm or shame anyone. Just lost my cool when I saw the comments of Old Codgers, which is not practical at all.

    Take or leave it, it’s up to all of you. I took a risk and shared some very confidential materials which are not free, from a paid investment recommendations letter for the sake of the country, it’s poor people and the generations to come. And I thought CT was a good forum for it, for influential and educated people visit it, and they would care and take some action about this issue.

    When the world is moving away from the dirty coal and other poisonous fossil fuels, why our leaders want to burden the country and ruin the peoples’ lives with out dated thing which going to immensely benefits only those few who promote these.

    These are under the radar advisories which are not in the main stream and the public domain.

    These are from an energy expert and investment adviser who is the consultant for 37 world governments – including the US -, many world leaders, top business leaders and investors.

    All what shared were from my experience and from the advisory, real true facts and not fiction, and for the good of all.

    • 2
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      Jaliya,
      I do not take offence over technical arguments. When you get to my age, you will realize that everything that shines is not gold, especially investment advice from “experts”. Financial gain and industrial success are two different things.Quite likely the shares they recommend will go up, but what’s to stop them coming down even faster (like Enron) when people find out the truth, eg, the sun shines 24 hours only at the Poles.
      My point is that we should stop this consumerist approach to energy and use as little as possible.

  • 3
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    About 25K US$ was spent to produce 2.8 kW power from a rooftop solar panel in Canada.

    30 Day Statistics kWh: 443.4
    365 days kWh/kW: 1303.8
    Total kWh Sent to Grid in May: 84
    Total kWh Sent to Grid this Year: 450

    Total kWh Sent to Grid in:
    2015: 1593
    2014: 1486

    http://www.theravinaproject.org

    Related video of the rooftop solar panel:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeY_EIAZqOA

    PS:
    One of Dr Chandran’s friend built this solar panel at his home during his leisure time while Dr Chandran from Canada was digging a 1700 Dutch map to investigate the names of hundreds of ancient villages in North and East of Sri Lanka!

  • 0
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    native Veddaa
    That a place-name can have one form in Tamil, and another form in Sinhala, does not seem to have any credence to Tamil Nationalists, although the historian who was most emphatic about it was surely Prof. Karthigesu Indrapala who stated that an over-overwhelming large number of place names in the North and east have sinhala origins. What ever the origins, today we also have a Tamil form, and the Sinhala form is what comes naturally to the Sinhala writer and sinhala speaker.

    Let the Sinhalese call it saamapura, the Tamils can call it Champoor as in tamil, while the anglicized people can call at Sampur. What the Tamils call “Illupikadavai, இலுப்பைக்கடவை, the sinhalese will Meepaathota, මීපාතොට as they have done even in the 4th century and before.

    Instead, I think the Tamil commentators have simply shown the fact that, in their view, it is an exclusive Tamil matter, somewhat like Wigneswaran’s attempt to erase the name of Nagadeepa. It is amazing that Wignasewaran is happy with the form “Nainativu”, a name introduced by fisher folk and Muslims, while the classic tamil name is “Nakatheepam”– I guess it sounds too close to the Sinhalese name Nagadeepa, and that is the problem.

    So, is this how the Tamils are reaching out towards re-conciliation? If they don’t respect the culture of the Sinhalese, how can they expect any respect for Tamil culture? It is Tamil bigotry that is now preventing the efforts to reconciliation, and nothing else. Since they want separation, they will oppose any moves to separation, and create opposition to the Sinhalese who use their language and use the name Saamapura!

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      Sumathipala

      “Prof. Karthigesu Indrapala who stated that an over-overwhelming large number of place names in the North and east have sinhala origins.”

      Could you cite reference.

      An amateur anthropologist/etymologist tells me Battaramulla a suburb of the city of Colombo used to be an ancient Tamil habitat. He traced its etymology to Paththar Moolai (Goldsmith Corner).

      After perusing your typing, I am beginning to believe him.

    • 4
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      Sumathipala

      You are NOT talking about Prof. Karthigesu Indrapala but you are talking about Mr. Karthigesu Indrapala, a 1965 PhD student. 40 years after his 1965 PhD thesis, Prof. Karthigesu Indrapala as a senior Archeologist/Historian says his PhD dissertation (with very limited material) is completely out of date (obsolete) that even he does not have a copy of his 1965 PhD thesis what he wrote 40 years ago as a PhD student. He further says in his recently published book, his 1965 PhD thesis (with full of assumptions and hypothesis) was presented as the first major attempt to bring together all available evidence on the subject and admits that it was in no way a complete study. It is natural to change the views/opinions and assumptions upon new findings.

      • 0
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        The research contained in that thesis was accepted by the University of London, and no other work countering it has been presented either at the London University or elsewhere.
        Dr. Karthigesu in his book on the Emergence of Ethnic Identities could have explicitly stated that his he no longer considers that the place-names in Jaffna did not have a Sinhala orgin. Instead he has written a whole chapter defending the Mahawamsa.

        Those who reviewed the book or commneted on it, have said that Karthigesu Iskirted discussing the place-names issue. He did not want to touch the matter even with a barge pole for fear of reprisals by tamil terror.

        If the tamils are ready to ape the English and adopt anglicized forms like Sampur, even ignoring the Tamil form, why should the Sinhalese follow that? They will pronounce it naturally, as their vocal chords are used to, just as genuine tamils follow the tamil dictation and not that of the English or the Portuguese. That is why they use Madurai rather than than Madras. Most of the tamil leaders are just English Educated lawyers who have use Tamil mainly to call their low caste servants derisively “Inga Va” etc., and live in Colombo.
        As for native vedda’s etymology abiut Battaramulla, what I have heard is that in the old days, it was so named because it was mainly of a particular “caste”. Similar names like “Radaa-mulla, radaa-goda” referred to the villages of the Dhobi caste.

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          In the 60s, that thesis was acceptable not only by the University of London but even by others, however today (after 4 decades) with significant developments, both in terms of archaeological research and changing historical perspectives, nobody will accept it.

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          Sumathipala

          “The research contained in that thesis was accepted by the University of London, and no other work countering it has been presented either at the London University or elsewhere.”

          PhD research is primarily done to add new knowledge to a discipline than counter each and every PhD thesis.

          “Dr. Karthigesu in his book on the Emergence of Ethnic Identities could have explicitly stated that his he no longer considers that the place-names in Jaffna did not have a Sinhala orgin. Instead he has written a whole chapter defending the Mahawamsa.”

          The book is to enlighten the stupid racists and there are too many, by the way could you refer the chapter page where he had defended Mahawamsa.

          “Those who reviewed the book or commneted on it, have said that Karthigesu Iskirted discussing the place-names issue. He did not want to touch the matter even with a barge pole for fear of reprisals by tamil terror.”

          Could you cite your reference.

          I am familiar with one reviewer, its our own old codger Bandu de Silva, a revisionist who is the only one to have access to Hugh Neville collection at the British Library. In his review or a sort of thing he had typed 18 pages and he said very little about the actual book.

          I would like you to find more about the history as whole than looking it from a whole. Tell us what exactly you know about the following inscriptions:

          A Pillar Inscription from Tirukkovil1 (1075 AD)

          Insriptions from NÈtaÍÈr KÐvil or Velgam VihÈre

          A Sixteenth Century Tamil Inscription from
          TirukkÐvil

          Two Inscriptions from TirukkÐvil

          Verugal Inscription

          Inscriptions from NÈtaÍÈr KÐvil

          An Endowment to a Siva Temple from Õtakada

          A Tamil Inscription from Polonnaruwa Rankot VihÈre

          A Grant to the Brahmins from Kirindagama

          A Pillar Tamil Inscription from Hingurakgoda

          A Tamil Inscription from Mahiyalla

          An Inscription from the Munnisvaram Siva Temple

          A Grant To Kali From Kalutara

          Three Tamil Inscriptions of the ‘Five Hundred of the Thousand Directions’

          Campanturai Copper Plates

          TicaiyÈirattu AiÎÎuÑÑuvar

          Inscription from VÈhalkaÆa

          Inscription of the Výrakoti from Galtenpitiya

          A Record from Polonnaruwa

          Inscription from Hanguranketa

          Inscription from Detiyamulla

          Inscription from Padaviya

          Two Inscriptions from Kantalai

          Inscription from Tirukketisvaram of Matottam

          Naimmana Inscription of Parakramabahu

          Tamil Inscription from Lankatilaka Vihare1

          Inscription from Paragama

          Inscription from Kalpitiya.

          Two Bilingual Inscriptions

          Inscription from Dellegama Devale

          Inscription from Miyanakandura

          Grantha Record from Hanguranketa

          Kotagama Inscription

          Let us know what you have learned from those Tamil inscriptions.

          Say hello to the old codger.

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      [Sinhalese name Nagadeepa]

      When did Indian words Naga and dveepa (teevam/teebam) become Sinhala word?

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        Naga and deepa became sinhala words when they began to appear in inscriptions in Mihintale and in Mahaatheetha area already during the 1st century BCE. Sinhala came from middle Prakrit which is closde to Asokan prakrit. See Paranavitana’s analyis of the Mihintale inscription where he identifies “Naga” etc.

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          Borrowing of English word in Sinhalese is always an English word and so the Indian word in Snhalese language.

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      [So, is this how the Tamils are reaching out towards re-conciliation? If they don’t respect the culture of the Sinhalese, how can they expect any respect for Tamil culture? It is Tamil bigotry that is now preventing the efforts to reconciliation, and nothing else. Since they want separation, they will oppose any moves to separation, and create opposition to the Sinhalese who use their language and use the name Saamapura! ]

      So, is this how the Sinhalese are reaching out towards re-conciliation? If they don’t respect the culture of the Tamiil, how can they expect any respect for Sinhala culture? It is Sinhala bigotry that is now preventing the efforts to reconciliation, and nothing else. Since they want imperialism, they will oppose any moves to live in peace, and create opposition to the Tamil who use their language and use the name Sambur/Sampur/champur!

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      This is what Prof K. Indrapala says about his 1965 thesis:
      I was planning my postgraduate research, the late Prof. W.J.F. LaBrooy, my revered teacher and, at that time, Head of the department of History at the University, advised me to research into the early history of the Tamils of Sri Lanka for my doctoral dissertation, as he considered this aspect to be a serious gap in the known history of the Island.
      The thesis was completed with the material that was available in the early 1960s.
      As long as excavation work remains undone, I pointed out; much that is relevant to our study will be wanting… Even the inscriptions and literary works that we have used have proved to be inadequate in the reconstruction of a satisfactory history of the settlements and in the solution of many important problems.
      The thesis was presented as the first major attempt to bring together all available evidence on the subject. THE FACT THAT IT WAS IN NO WAY A COMPLETE STUDY WAS ADMITTED. In view of these limitations and difficulties, while we may claim to have added something to our knowledge of the history of the Tamils of Ceylon, the account presented here is inevitably incomplete and not always definite. We have often been led to state our conclusions in hypothetical terms.
      NEEDLESS TO SAY, THAT DISSERTATION IS NOW COMPLETELY OUT OF DATE. MY OWN PERSPECTIVES AND INTERPRETATIONS HAVE CHANGED SINCE ITS COMPLETION.
      More importantly, significant developments, both in terms of archaeological research and changing historical perspectives, have taken place in the last four decades.

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    I remember this professor writing couple of articles promoting alternate energy sources discouraging the fossil fuel power generation. He has only theoretical (could be research) knowledge and has no practical and operational experience of running power generations and distribution systems and networks.

    To my understanding he has been given several grants from various multinationals to promote solar power in Sri Lanka. This was like discouraging coconut oil due to health reasons and promoting other varieties and destroying the coconut industries of poorer nations.

    The greenhouse gases emission by human activities contribute only 3% and the rest from natural activities. Now consider Sri Lanka, the population is 22 million with a small land mass. The one of key indices used to measure is the gas emission by land mass, if you blindly follow this rule Sri Lanka has to reduce the emissions but totally neglecting the socio-economic factors. This is how the western world force us putting constraints/barriers when go for grants and soft loan schemes.

    I regret that a learned person like the author acts as a puppet of the multinationals without considering the pros and cons of his recommendations and evaluating the best option for SL with a holistic view.

    Fossils fuel are still cheap and affordable for a developing country like SL and should be fully exploit the power generation.

    For your information, China is still building coal power systems also replacing dirty coal system with state of the art technology gaining efficiency.

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    There is Tamilization of Sinhala place names and there is Sinhalaization of Tamil place names.
    Samapura for Sampur is not a standard Sinhalization of a Tamil place name. It is either plain ignorance or pure mischief. Even his calling Trincomalee by one of its ancient names “Gokarna” seems not well intended.

    By these diversions, the author has only done disservice to his article. Even serious responses to the core content has been drowned in what are mostly trivia.

    Opposition to coal power is for many social and technical reasons. People of the District, irrespective of nationality, are increasingly against it; and that is important. Much of the author’s objections have been raised by others too in various fora already.

    About wind and solar energy not being true alternatives for fossil fuel. They can contribute to reduce the fuel bill, no more. Roof-top solar etc. are like urban home vegetable gardens in Havana, which help in a little way to solve the problem but not the answer to the problem.

    Prof. David is correct about Dendro too. It was a badly failed project, despite the enthusiasm of CEB personnel involved in it. If anyone thinks that it is a feasible alternative and it was CEB’s indifference that is at fault, can one say why no private sector entrepreneur would undertake such a profitable (but questionably environmentally friendly) project.

    The core energy issue in Sri Lanka is still whether we are using our electric energy wisely.
    It is a global issue too.

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