28 October, 2020

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The Politics Of Kishani Jayasinghe – Part II

By Izeth Hussain

Izeth Hussain

Izeth Hussain

When the storm rages, and the ship of state is treatened with wreckage, we can do no better than to sink the anchor of our peaceful studies in the ground of eternity. – Johannes Kepler

Ah, what an age it is/ When to speak of trees is almost a crime/ For it is a kind of silence about injustice. – Bertold Brecht

As I have been arguing in earlier articles – citing the theories of Emmanuel Todd – the transition to modernity is hardly ever smooth, and it is frequently accompanied by violence. The undrlying reason is that in the procss of transition the old is displaced by the new, and that is something that is frequently resisted. Sri Lanka is in the throes of the modernization process. It is not surprising therefore that Kishani Jayasinghe‘s (KJ) operatic rendition of Dunno Budunge on the occasion of the National Day was seen as an intrusion of the alien and threatening Western into the realm of the national sacred. Modernity requires accelerated economic development which usually results in increased inequality, setting off envy and hatred among a substantial segment of the people. Perhaps it was not altogether surprising that that envy and hatred were deployed against KJ on an epic scale. What was really surprising was that the most vicious of the email attacks, according to what she wrote, came from females while the most suportive were from males.Kishani Jayasinghe

But Nan in her Sunday Island column of March 13 wrote, “Two things I am convinced about. The three most hate-laden letters were NOT written by women but by frustrated, mentally abberated young men”. However the same issue of the Sunday Island carried a coruscating excoriation of the negative aspects of Sri Lanka womanhood by Devika Brendon. She wrote, “This incident highlights what many people know about contemporary Sri Lanka: that, despite its many positive aspects, it is a repressed, vindictive, and punitive culture. There are practical reasons for the existence of exorcism ceremonies and protection rituals, and invocation of charms against the Evil Eye”. What is the explanation for such starkly contrasting views of the same phenomenon: Sri Lankan womanhood? Devika Brendon’s article has the merit of calling attention to the need for in-depth studies of that subject, going beyond the worn stereotype that our womanhood is well emancipated because we produced the world’s first woman Prime Minister.

In the first part of this article I made some observations on the significance of KJ’s rendition of Dunno Budunge in the perspective of modernization which entails a process of ongoing total revolutionary change. That process entails also the intrusion of the alien into the indigenous, of the universal into the insular. KJ’s rendition caused outrage because it was seen as a Western desecration of a Sinhalese song embedded in the folk tradition, which furthermore powerfully embodied the Buddhist sense of the sacred. But that desecration was already there in the song itself. The consensus among musicologists is that it is not an indigenous Sinhalese folk song; it was composed by Viswanath Lauji in the style of North Indian classical music. Furthermore it was believed that the melody was derived from one of Mendelssohn’s Songs without Words. That is disputed but the similarity between the two melodies was very clear to me in the Murray Perahia version of the Song. It is worth mentioning also that one of the performers who popularised the song in Sri Lanka was Mohideen Baig, a Tamil Muslim from South India, who also popularized several quintessentially Sinhalese songs. So, as a part of modernisation, the alien breaks into the indigenous, and the universal into the insular. Consequently, Kishani J should not have been berated for desecrating the indigenous but congratulated for making a contribution towards Sri Lankan modernity.

The process of the alien breaking into the indigenous can of course be totally destructive. But as part of the process of modernisation, which has certain values behind it, the alien could be partly destructive, partly creative, or wholly creative. In the case of the supposedly quintessential Sinhalese folk song, Dunno Badunge, the alien elements that I have outlined above have certainly been wholly creative. As another example I will cite the films of the Iranian Abbas Kiarostami,who was declared by Kurosawa to be Asia’s best film director after the death of Satyajith Ray and is now mentioned in the same breath as all the other cinema greats. The greatest influence on him has been the films of the French film director, Robert Bresson. The films of both present a case, they make you think, they don’t grip and involve you in a story that leads to the emotional satisfaction provided by a cathartic conclusion. The technique is similar to the “alienation effect” in the revolutionary theatre of Bertold Brecht. Note that all the names I have mentioned, apart from Kiarostami, are non-Iranian: Kurosawa, Ray, Bresson,Brecht, a fact that attests to the universalism that is an aspect of modernity.

However, the contents of Kiarostami’s films are thoroughly and authentically Iranian – at least the ones I have seen. The reason why they seem authentically Iranian is the very moving empathetic understanding shown towards very ordinary people. That seems to be the expression of a culture shaped by Shi’ism, which historically has been the Islam of the oppressed. But at the end of two of the films the Western obtrudes in a spectacular manner, which strangely does not jar but is in total harmony with the non-Western Iranian ethos of the films. The life-affirming conclusion of Through the Olive Trees has in its background the music of Vivaldi. And the life-affirming conclusion of his best-known film, A Taste of Cherry, uses as background music the jazz classic St James Infirmary. So we have a felicitous blending in the one case of the Iranian with the music of the Italian baroque, and in the other of the Iranian with the music of the blacks of New Orleans.

The process of modernisation entails revolutionary change and also the intrusion of the alien into the indegenous, both of which were exemplified in KJ’s rendition of Dunno Budunge. She had to suffer the consequences. Kiorastami too had to suffer consequences after A Taste of Cherry won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival of 1997. The film was banned in Iran because it gave a sympathetic portrayal of a would-be suicide – Islam forbids suicide. The showing of the film at Cannes received standing ovations before and after, but thereafter disaster followed because Kiarostami in receiving the award kissed Catherine Deneuve on the cheek. Revolutionary Iran would have none of that. Iranian film aficionados who had organized a grand reception for the conquering hero at the airport were heavily outnumbered by Iranian revolutionaries who were out to give him the works. The conquering hero had to be whisked away through a side door. Looks like we and the Iranians have some things in common: sexual repression which was probably behind much of the hatred directed against the gorgeously structured KJ, and Buddhism like Shi’ism can be seen as a religion of the oppressed. (Concluded).

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  • 6
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    Izeth Hussein, Sir,

    When analyzing all the research out there on the origins of Danno Budunge, one finds that Mendelssohn’s piece came *AFTER* Danno Budunge. One finds that out of 215 characters with spaces in Danno Budunge’s main tune, the variation of Mendelssohn’s which Danno Budunge is supposed to have come from, is only about 12.56%.

    Because we did not have recording devices to record musical performance before the 1900’s, it seems that Danno Budunge type music was not apparently present in Lankan music scene. Neither were the Lankan folk chants apparently present.

    But yet, present-day performances give proof to our musical continuum from ancient heritage. And finally we can record them by video and put them out on YouTube for future generations to see. The cultural base was always there to give rise to our songs. Together with the folk chants, are also the aesthetic performances of melody and tune that come out very often in Buddhist Bakthi Geetha.

    It’s true we go to India to learn technique. But when we come back to Lanka, our natural aptitude for melody cannot be held back, and bursts forth into all kinds of pretty tunes.

    • 9
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      Yes, Thambi has got that awfully wrong.

      I have the full collection of two hours worth of “Mendhelson’s songs without words” and I listened to the entire collection just to re-check on this fraudulent asserstion. There is not a tune that even resembles Danno Budunge.

      Enemies of Sinhala Buddhist culture, especially those clinging to evil belief systems like Islam are trying as hard as they can to denigrate this great philosophy and culture.

      That is why Winston Churchill wrote in his River War (1899) that: “The influence of the Muslim religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith.”

      Basing Sinhala songs on North or other Indian ragadhari music is quite ok because all south Asian music descends from it, unlike the Arabic tone-deaf music of Hussains’.

      Pity the Mohamaddian Infidels!

      • 14
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        Saraswathie – the “fraudulent assertion” that Dunno Budunge derives from one of Mendelssohn’s Songs without words was put forward not by me but by Arun Dias Bandaranaike in an article which gave details of the research done on the subject.His view was echoed by others in their responses to my article. I merely stated, echoing the views of others in the CT columns, that I could see a resemblance in the Murray Perahia version.
        Will you please acknowledge therefore that your extremely insulting remarks about me were unwarranted, and apologize? – IH

        • 12
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          Don’t hold your breath Izzeth Hussein, moronic idiots like Saraswathie are not only tone deaf to understand the intricacies of musical classics but too stupid to recognise their errors. Calling names is the best they can do and expect to be applauded for their cleverness.

          • 6
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            Can’t someone else defend this song without getting racist about it?

            It very easy for others to then smoothly come up with their own analysis, however far-fetched it is. And our Buddhists will actually buy the implausible explanation, and authenticate it.

            For our Buddhists, it’s all about not rising up excessive emotion. But carefully screening the supposed “authenticated “versions and going through analysis, eka danneth nae.

            For the sake of the middle-path, fellows will quickly dismiss any controversy to avoid taxing their brains too much, and leave the masses to throw bombs in frustration, when their very culture and heritage is under attack.

            • 2
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              Ramona,
              Here is a good defence of the song, by courtesy of Ram:

              1) The melody of Danno Budunge was composed by King Ravana with his pol katu veenava. The melody resided in the hearts of Sinhala Buddhists until rediscovered by Lauji who slightly modified it. 2) This same Ravana who invented the dandu monara plane hid his plans somewhere which was robbed by Wright brothers much later and reinvented Ravana’s aeroplane which ran with fuel!
              3) Ravana also had discovered the laws of gravity and theory of relativity long before Newton and Einstein and had these laws/theories written in ola leaf which were found by Newton and Einstein when they visited Sri Lanka in secret visits never recorded in the history as part of a big western conspiracy to put down the Sinhala Buddhist culture.
              4) Shakespeare was a Sinhala Buddist boy born in Mathara who was taken to England by the Europeans!
              Rama

              • 1
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                Old Codger,

                Did you see my reply to Rama, below? True, no……about European culture and knowledge before and after colonization…..

            • 0
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              ” when their very culture and heritage is under attack.”

              are you referring to the 1983 culture ramona dear.Music was the least of my worries on that day when you culturous fellows were asking me demelathe sinhalade as i was passing hacked bodies and burnt out cars with the occupants inside.Fortunately when i said i am sinhala they went dancing off with their swords swinging in a cultural dance towards the next victim.since you went as a child to the states you missed all the culture.

              • 2
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                Shankar,

                Terrible things indeed…..but I am talking about pre-independence culture and heritage.

                No, didn’t come to USA as a child…..but went to SE Asia. Been in and out of Sri Lankan when I was a child, and teenager, and have lived and studied in Sri Lanka. Missed all those riots, but I heard it was a terrible time for some Tamil relatives.

                • 0
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                  ramona

                  “.but I am talking about pre-independence culture and heritage.”

                  was it the patricide culture like when kasyappa walled up his father alive?Or was it the queen anula lust culture of poisoning about 5 kings in a row when she got lustful for another soldier.A chap i know also said his wife tried to poison him.I told him it is anula’s genes and she can’t help it.he seemed to be slightly mollified but got a divorce.

                  one thing i love about the srilankan culture is you never get a boring day in your life.Just imagine if you are surrounded by saints,what a boring life it will be,yawning and yawning the whole day.Here when you know a knife can come into your back anytime from the least expected source it keeps you mentally alert and you don’t feel the time pass.

                  i thought you told me at one time that you live in the US and went there when you were small.you mention tamil relatives,are you a tamil?

                  • 0
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                    never did tell you Shankar, that I cam to the US when I was small….and I’m part Tamil….

                    • 0
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                      which part,the bottom or the top?the brawn or the brain?

                    • 0
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                      The chromosomes, Shankar.

                  • 0
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                    “The chromosomes, Shankar.”
                    You might get a load of B.S. from Ramona T
                    BUT,
                    You won’t get an angry word out of Ramona T, Shankar.

                    • 0
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                      old codger

                      “You won’t get an angry word out of Ramona T”

                      she can’t even if she wants to because she says she is trying hard to be a true bhuddhist.So she can’t display anger even if she gets angry.

                      i have tried so hard to needle her but as you say it is like knocking your head against a brick wall.I give up.Any others except her you know who claim to be true bhuddhists?

                    • 0
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                      shankar,

                      …not sure…don’t know what to say……writing is so much easier than talking……one can then avoid the BS, and settle issues with greater perception (irrespective of religion).

                  • 0
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                    Shankar,
                    You could debate with Sach on true Buddhism.

        • 0
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          [Edited out]

          • 12
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            Saraswathie

            “[Edited out]”

            Brilliant.

            Thanks for keeping it brief.

        • 3
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          Saraswathie

          Looks like our friend Izeth Hussain is in the final stages of his
          mental breakdown. I was afraid it was coming to that. Now any Tamil name or reference to that community, sends him into an uncontrollable rage. Let’s hope his Shrink is able to help him.

          Nettabomman

          • 6
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            Nettabomman -you have made common cause with Saraswathie. Had to be expected.She is a rabid Islamophobic racist. So are you. She has been given a splendid comeuppance. You, Backie, and other Tamil Islamophobic racists have been given another splendid comeuppance by Leelananda – See below – IH

      • 17
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        Saraswathie

        is supposed to be the Hindu goddess of knowledge, music, arts, wisdom and learning who types:

        “That is why Winston Churchill wrote in his River War (1899) that: “The influence of the Muslim religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith.”

        Since you have chosen to quote Winston Churchill let see how he respected fellow human being in the following article:

        Not his finest hour: The dark side of Winston Churchill
        By Johann Hari Wednesday 27 October 2010

        Winston Churchill is rightly remembered for leading Britain through her finest hour – but what if he also led the country through her most shameful hour? What if, in addition to rousing a nation to save the world from the Nazis, he fought for a raw white supremacism and a concentration camp network of his own? This question burns through Richard Toye’s new history, Churchill’s Empire, and is even seeping into the Oval Office.

        George W Bush left a bust of Churchill near his desk in the White House, in an attempt to associate himself with the war leader’s heroic stand against fascism. Barack Obama had it returned to Britain. It’s not hard to guess why: his Kenyan grandfather, Hussein Onyango Obama, was imprisoned without trial for two years and was tortured on Churchill’s watch, for resisting Churchill’s empire.

        Can these clashing Churchills be reconciled? Do we live, at the same time, in the world he helped to save, and the world he helped to trash? Toye, one of Britain’s smartest young historians, has tried to pick through these questions dispassionately – and he should lead us, at last and at least, to a more mature conversation about our greatest national icon.

        Churchill was born in 1874 into a Britain that was washing the map pink, at the cost of washing distant nations blood red. Victoria had just been crowned Empress of India, and the scramble for Africa was only a few years away. At Harrow School and then Sandhurst, he was told a simple story: the superior white man was conquering the primitive, dark-skinned natives, and bringing them the benefits of civilisation. As soon as he could, Churchill charged off to take his part in “a lot of jolly little wars against barbarous peoples”. In the Swat valley, now part of Pakistan, he experienced, fleetingly, a crack of doubt. He realised that the local population was fighting back because of “the presence of British troops in lands the local people considered their own,” just as Britain would if she were invaded. But Churchill soon suppressed this thought, deciding instead they were merely deranged jihadists whose violence was explained by a “strong aboriginal propensity to kill”.

        He gladly took part in raids that laid waste to whole valleys, destroying houses and burning crops. He then sped off to help reconquer the Sudan, where he bragged that he personally shot at least three “savages”.

        The young Churchill charged through imperial atrocities, defending each in turn. When concentration camps were built in South Africa, for white Boers, he said they produced “the minimum of suffering”. The death toll was almost 28,000, and when at least 115,000 black Africans were likewise swept into British camps, where 14,000 died, he wrote only of his “irritation that Kaffirs should be allowed to fire on white men”. Later, he boasted of his experiences there: “That was before war degenerated. It was great fun galloping about.”

        Then as an MP he demanded a rolling programme of more conquests, based on his belief that “the Aryan stock is bound to triumph”. There seems to have been an odd cognitive dissonance in his view of the “natives”. In some of his private correspondence, he appears to really believe they are helpless children who will “willingly, naturally, gratefully include themselves within the golden circle of an ancient crown”.

        But when they defied this script, Churchill demanded they be crushed with extreme force. As Colonial Secretary in the 1920s, he unleashed the notorious Black and Tan thugs on Ireland’s Catholic civilians, and when the Kurds rebelled against British rule, he said: “I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilised tribes…[It] would spread a lively terror.”

        Of course, it’s easy to dismiss any criticism of these actions as anachronistic. Didn’t everybody think that way then? One of the most striking findings of Toye’s research is that they really didn’t: even at the time, Churchill was seen as at the most brutal and brutish end of the British imperialist spectrum. Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin was warned by Cabinet colleagues not to appoint him because his views were so antedeluvian. Even his startled doctor, Lord Moran, said of other races: “Winston thinks only of the colour of their skin.”

        Many of his colleagues thought Churchill was driven by a deep loathing of democracy for anyone other than the British and a tiny clique of supposedly superior races. This was clearest in his attitude to India. When Mahatma Gandhi launched his campaign of peaceful resistance, Churchill raged that he “ought to be lain bound hand and foot at the gates of Delhi, and then trampled on by an enormous elephant with the new Viceroy seated on its back.” As the resistance swelled, he announced: “I hate Indians. They are a beastly people with a beastly religion.” This hatred killed. To give just one, major, example, in 1943 a famine broke out in Bengal, caused – as the Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen has proved – by the imperial policies of the British. Up to 3 million people starved to death while British officials begged Churchill to direct food supplies to the region. He bluntly refused. He raged that it was their own fault for “breeding like rabbits”. At other times, he said the plague was “merrily” culling the population.

        Skeletal, half-dead people were streaming into the cities and dying on the streets, but Churchill – to the astonishment of his staff – had only jeers for them. This rather undermines the claims that Churchill’s imperialism was motivated only by an altruistic desire to elevate the putatively lower races.

        Hussein Onyango Obama is unusual among Churchill’s victims only in one respect: his story has been rescued from the slipstream of history, because his grandson ended up as President of the US. Churchill believed that Kenya’s fertile highlands should be the preserve of the white settlers, and approved the clearing out of the local “blackamoors”. He saw the local Kikuyu as “brutish children”. When they rebelled under Churchill’s post-war premiership, some 150,000 of them were forced at gunpoint into detention camps – later dubbed “Britain’s gulag” by Pulitzer-prize winning historian, Professor Caroline Elkins. She studied the detention camps for five years for her remarkable book Britain’s Gulag: The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya, explains the tactics adopted under Churchill to crush the local drive for independence. “Electric shock was widely used, as well as cigarettes and fire,” she writes. “The screening teams whipped, shot, burned, and mutilated Mau Mau suspects.” Hussein Onyango Obama never truly recovered from the torture he endured.

        Many of the wounds Churchill inflicted have still not healed: you can find them on the front pages any day of the week. He is the man who invented Iraq, locking together three conflicting peoples behind arbitrary borders that have been bleeding ever since. He is the Colonial Secretary who offered the Over-Promised Land to both the Jews and the Arabs – although he seems to have privately felt racist contempt for both. He jeered at the Palestinians as “barbaric hoards who ate little but camel dung,” while he was appalled that the Israelis “take it for granted that the local population will be cleared out to suit their convenience”.

        True, occasionally Churchill did become queasy about some of the most extreme acts of the Empire. He fretted at the slaughter of women and children, and cavilled at the Amritsar massacre of 1919. Toye tries to present these doubts as evidence of moderation – yet they almost never seem to have led Churchill to change his actions. If you are determined to rule people by force against their will, you can hardly be surprised when atrocities occur. Rule Britannia would inexorably produce a Cruel Britannia.

        So how can the two be reconciled? Was Churchill’s moral opposition to Nazism a charade, masking the fact he was merely trying to defend the British Empire from a rival?

        The US civil rights leader Richard B. Moore, quoted by Toye, said it was “a rare and fortunate coincidence” that at that moment “the vital interests of the British Empire [coincided] with those of the great overwhelming majority of mankind”. But this might be too soft in its praise. If Churchill had only been interested in saving the Empire, he could probably have cut a deal with Hitler. No: he had a deeper repugnance for Nazism than that. He may have been a thug, but he knew a greater thug when he saw one – and we may owe our freedom today to this wrinkle in history.

        This, in turn, led to the great irony of Churchill’s life. In resisting the Nazis, he produced some of the richest prose-poetry in defence of freedom and democracy ever written. It was a cheque he didn’t want black or Asian people to cash – but they refused to accept that the Bank of Justice was empty. As the Ghanaian nationalist Kwame Nkrumah wrote: “All the fair, brave words spoken about freedom that had been broadcast to the four corners of the earth took seed and grew where they had not been intended.” Churchill lived to see democrats across Britain’s dominions and colonies – from nationalist leader Aung San in Burma to Jawarlal Nehru in India – use his own intoxicating words against him.

        Ultimately, the words of the great and glorious Churchill who resisted dictatorship overwhelmed the works of the cruel and cramped Churchill who tried to impose it on the darker-skinned peoples of the world. The fact that we now live in a world where a free and independent India is a superpower eclipsing Britain, and a grandson of the Kikuyu “savages” is the most powerful man in the world, is a repudiation of Churchill at his ugliest – and a sweet, ironic victory for Churchill at his best.

        http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/
        politics/not-his-finest-hour-the-dark
        -side-of-winston-churchill-2118317.html

        Saraswathie Nona

        If the racist was your hero obviously knowledge, music, arts, wisdom and learning must be too alien concepts to you.

        • 6
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          N.V,
          Don’t you think your post is far too long for Saraswathie’s eight second attention span? Please condense to 4 sentences and remove words with more than 2 syllables.

          • 12
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            Old Codger

            “Don’t you think your post is far too long for Saraswathie’s eight second attention span?”

            I know these people are incapable of reading more than two lines however the reason I copied and pasted this article was that others have an opportunity to learn about Churchill’s bigotry.

            • 2
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              yes,native,though it was long it was very interesting and i thank you for it.I knew about churchil saying he hates indians,but did not know about the darker side until i read it.Now my admiration of him is zero.

              Treating people who fight for their own land as if they are criminals is a mark of a subhuman.Until i read this i did not think churchill was a subhuman,not fully evolved from the animal species.actually it seems now that churchill vs hitler was one subhuman against another.

      • 10
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        Saraswathie

        Do you believe in Stupidity being a Virtue? Ignorance being a Virtue? Just curious.

        1. ” Yes, Thambi has got that awfully wrong.”

        2. “That is why Winston Churchill wrote in his River War (1899) that:..”

        3. “Pity the Mohamaddian Infidels!”

        Saraswathie, you got it wrong on all the 3 items above.

        1. “.. by Arun Dias Bandaranaike in an article which gave details of the research done on the subject.”

        If true, please acknowledge, and move on, to the next item.

        2.” Winston Churchill in his River War (1899)”, You Quote:

        “The influence of the Muslim religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_River_War

        The issue has nothing to do with Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith, or Christianism or Hinduism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has everything to do with BRITISH IMPERIALISM AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE.

        3. “Pity the Mohamaddian Infidels!”

        Remember, the Great Game. This was part of the Great Game, between the British Empire and the Russian Empire. Britain wanted the Empire to extend from Egypt to India, Burma,and Ceylon( Sri Lanka) included. So, it was Islam, they called Mohammedanism, especially with the Ottoman Empire, that stood in the way, and most of the people in the lands to be colonized were Muslims, “Mohammedans”, and shows the ignorance of Churchill of the religion of Islam.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Game

        Please remember, World War 1 and World War 2 were colonial wars. It was all about dividing the colonies among themselves, fir their own self interest. Have your heard about the Sykes-Picot Agreement of 1916, and the Middle East turmoil that is happening today?

        After World War 2, the Colonial powers wanted their colonies back, yes back. Winston Churchill did not want the Brown Skinned Indians, with hardly any clothes to get the Jewel of the Empire. So he opposed indian independance. Fortunately he was defeated by the wiser Brist People led by the Labour Party, and the rest is history.

        However, the Dutch, the French, the Belgians and the Portuguese did not want to give up their colonies and grant independence to the natives. These countries had ti fight bitter colonial wars to gain independence. Must thank the Soviet Union, China and Cuba for their assistance for these independence movements.

        “Pity the Mohamaddian Infidels! ” …..From the God of the Old Testament, that Christians Believe will save them? Actually it was the imperialism, that all the people had to be saved.

        “The God of the Old Testament is arguably the most unpleasant character in all fiction: jealous and proud of it; a petty, unjust, unforgiving control-freak; a vindictive, bloodthirsty ethnic cleanser; a misogynistic, homophobic, racist, infanticidal, genocidal, filicidal, pestilential, megalomaniacal, sadomasochistic, capriciously malevolent bully.”
        ― Richard Dawkins, The God Delusion

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovWs8JQN7FE

      • 7
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        Saraswathie Nona

        “That is why Winston Churchill wrote in his River War (1899) that: …”

        ““I hate Indians. They are a beastly people with a beastly religion.” This hatred killed. To give just one, major, example, in 1943 a famine broke out in Bengal, caused – as the Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen has proved – by the imperial policies of the British. Up to 3 million people starved to death while British officials begged Churchill to direct food supplies to the region. He bluntly refused. He raged that it was their own fault for “breeding like rabbits”. At other times, he said the plague was “merrily” culling the population.”

        Saraswati

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saraswati

        Saraswati (Sanskrit: सरस्वती, Sarasvatī) is the Hindu goddess of knowledge, music, arts, wisdom and learning. She is a part of the trinity of Saraswati, Lakshmi and Parvati.

        So this Saraswathie Nona must be the Hindu goddess of STUPIDITY, IGNORANCE, No-music, No-arts, No-wisdom and No-learning. She is a part of the trinity of Stupidity, Ignorance and N-Wisdom, as written above.

        If the racist was your hero obviously knowledge, music, arts, wisdom and learning must be too alien concepts to you.
        Native Vedda
        March 19, 2016 at 9:25 pm
        Reply

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          Dear Amarasiri, thanks a lot for putting that rabid racist Saraswathie, in place. She is indeed a fanatic Islamophobic moron, as you beautifully summarise: ‘So this Saraswathie Nona must be the Hindu goddess of STUPIDITY, IGNORANCE, No-music, No-arts, No-wisdom and No-learning.

      • 7
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        Saraswahie, you are in good company I guess.
        This is unadulterated bigotry from a man who called Mk Gandhi a ‘half-naked fakir’ and bombed Dresden and Hamburg out of spite after Germany was defeated.

        IH
        It is wise not to rake up a controversial comment without research, unless you endorse it.
        Having stirred a controversy and much hard feeling, there is little use in taking cover behind the source.

        We like to be always right but never once sorry.

        • 2
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          SJ – What on earth are you talking about? What controversial comment? – IH

        • 6
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          If there was nothing controversial, why are people yelling at each other?
          Beats me!

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            Sj

            yelling is part of srilankan culture,even if there is nothing to yell about.So don’t assume that there is something wrong because there is yelling.i tell my wife and sister why the hell they have to yell to tell something to me when they are standing right next to me.If you want a deeper analysis of our culture both post and preindependece seperately ask ramona threse fernando,as i not an expert on it, just an observer only.

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            Come off it SJ – what was the controversial comment? Is it that you don’t want to be explicit on that because you expect punishment will follow? – IH

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              You made a silly remark about the source of Danno Budunge and that was followed by an avalanche of offensive remarks.

              Get one thing clear IZ, you are the one who is getting plastered here but insensitive to realize it.

              I have little time for bigots with racist obsession of any kind.

              • 0
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                SJ – what was the “silly remark”, come on what was the silly remark? Is it that you dare not mention it because you know that I will “plaster” you in reply? – IH

                • 0
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                  Plaster yourself in your Turkish folk song.

                  • 0
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                    SJ- to the reader – SJ refuses to say what was the “silly remark” I made.The reason is obvious: he fears the punishment that will follow. – IH

                  • 1
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                    If you are so dull witted to understand what the reference is to, or do not remember what you wrote about the source of Danno Budunge go through what you have been dishing out.
                    Byeeeee.

                    • 0
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                      SJ – abuse will get you nowhere SJ. There was nothing wrong in anything I wrote about Dunno Budunge. Of course misconstructions can be placed on it by racists. Can you at least tell me what is your ethnicity, or are you too cowardly for that also? Of course everyone knows why you dare not state what was wrong with what I wrote: the retaliatory whacking will be prompt. Come on SJ, what’s your ethnicity? – IH

                    • 1
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                      Anyone that disagrees with you has to belong to certain tribes.
                      That is pathetic
                      So you need to know one’s ethnicity to respond accordingly.
                      Do some research.

    • 0
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      IH can you comment on the Brussels airport & metro attack by Islamic terrorist

      • 0
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        Rajash:’IH can you comment on the Brussels airport & metro attack by Islamic terrorist’.

        WHEN RELIGION BECAME COLONIZED

        The cause behind ISIS is not religious . Certainly it is not Islam that is behind ISIS . Nor any Religion could be behind ISIS or produce ISIS or create evil. What religion produces is ultimate good for both : the individual and the society .. Religion is not meant to be good for some and evil for others but meant to be good for all.

        Religion is related to God , therefore religion is like a candle that gives light to all in all directions . Those who think that religion – any religion- can produce evil are certainly ignorant . Therefore, what created ISIS and the sisters of ISIS is nothing religious but is rather the absence and the ignorance of Religion . It is the enemies of Religion that created ISIS helped by the ignorance of the Religion . The question therefore is : If ISIS does not have its roots in Religion then where is it rooted ? The answer to that is : in colonialism . It is colonialism that created ISIS as it created Zionism , because the origin of Zionism is colonialism and not Judaism – as some like to think – although Zionism acted in the name of Judaism as ISIS is acting in the name of Islam .

        ISIS- therefore- behaves as a colonialist power and not as a religious group or a Muslim one, and the thugs of ISIS have been taught and inculcated the behavior of colonialists and this is why they act and behave like the Zionist settlers act and behave . ISIS and Company invade and usurp and kill and abuse . This is not Religion for sure but something alien to Religion . This is colonialism.

        Ignorance and incomplete religious knowledge proved to be a fertile land for fanaticism and intolerance to grow, and the thugs of ISIS- and its sisters- with little religious superficial knowledge, have been totally manipulated by the colonialists and brainwashed. Instead of completing and receiving their Religion from their religious masters and references , they got their religious education at the hands of secret services and those who work for these services to the point of becoming significantly alienated from their environment and society and culture and religion . They have become totally disconnected from all this, which is why they have become so destructive.

        To these people , brothers and families and children do not mean anything. They have been told that they would have to install the Khilafa in Arab land as the Zionists were told to establish Israel in Palestine . That the Terrorists and Israel act the same despite the difference in their Religion means that their master is one. This will not be the first time that religion is blamed for the colonialist actions , colonialists have many times hid behind Religion and acted under its banner . In fact, Religion is the first thing that was colonized by the colonizer.

        • 3
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          ziad

          “What religion produces is ultimate good for both : the individual and the society”

          On the contrary, what Sinhala/Buddhism produced were three evils, the state, JVP and LTTE.

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            Native Vedda I don’t agree with your contention that Sinhala/Buddhism is any different from any other religion. No religion had produced misfits in any society. Neither America represent Christianity; nor the Zionists Judaism and/or no Saudi Arabia represent Islam. Neither the Sri Lankan government represent Buddhism.

            • 1
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              ziad

              Seriously where did these three evils originate from?

              Please think about it.

            • 0
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              Yeah, Native Vedda…..

            • 0
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              Ziad,
              Sinhala Buddhism has produced no large-scale (over 1 million) mass murderers. Might be because the number of S.B’s is small compared to Christians, Muslims, etc.

      • 0
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        THE BRUSSELS ATTACKS: LEST THEY FORGET

        The Europeans have forgotten everything and very early . They forgot how they rallied against the dictator of Syria . How – almost everyday – not long time ago, they took to streets in one of their cities and capitals to call for democracy in Syria, and also for democracy in Libya, and also for the removal of the dictators . They forgot how they were demonstrating on regular basis to promote democracy in Syria as if they knew what democracy was , and as if they did not live in police states that represent Terror itself . They have forgotten this very early and very quickly, how they encouraged the so called opposition, and how they believed the lies of their media and every word spoken against the president of Syria, and how they filled the social media with their support for the thugs of the opposition, and how they raised the 3 stars flags in their demonstrations everywhere they went , the flag of occupation and colonial rule . .

        They also forgot how their governments hosted the Syrian opposition in all its varieties and shades , and how they opened their five stars hotels to all , and how they helped them in every respect: in collecting money and campaigning and having access to the media and recruiting . They forgot how the mosques- established by KSA- were busy day and night recruiting and recruiting and recruiting ; and the destination was Syria of course , the promised land of the Revolution. They have forgotten how NATO Turkey was turned into a crossing land for the thugs coming from the four quarters of the earth; how destroying and looting Syria and killing Syrians became the pass word for every hired mercenary and professional killer and of every ex convict and criminal .

        They forgot about the tons of evolved weapons and sophisticated equipment that crossed the NATO borders in order to supply the thugs with everything they needed . They had forgotten all this and, for this reason, it was time to remind them of what they did and what they are still doing. It was time to remind them that- with their complacency and ignorance and misinformation and collaboration – they shared in destroying a country and genociding a whole people and, therefore, were as guilty as their governments whom they pretend to question and oppose .

        It was time to remind all these supporters and promoters of democracy of whom they were really supporting and promoting . They were promoting and supporting the terrorist thugs of the opposition, the gangs of well trained killers, sent by US and company , to operate under the banner of Religion , to massacre and usurp and enslave . This enslavement is what the west has been practicing for centuries that was enforced on our countries and societies.. Millions were being killed in Syria and Iraq and in Libya, and millions were being displaced and genocided , and countries were destroyed and much more than that , but the Europeans were rallying for democracy- by thousands- and for freedom and for civil rights in these countries .

        Whom are you trying to fool you European activists and intellectuals and leftists and progressives , demonstrators and protesters ? Whom are you trying to fool? What you did is unforgivable and is turning against you . It is against your governments that you should have rallied , against the creation and manufacture of Terror by your governments that is striking back at you , against the interference in Arab countries and societies by way of armies and proxy armies and well trained gangs and dubious NGOs . It is against this that you should have demonstrated , not against Assad nor Kaddhafi, because neither Assad nor Kaddhafi are the source of the plight of this world . The plight of this world are your governments whom you are feeding with your own ignorance and money, and who are promoters and manufacturers of Terror all over the World from Israel to ISIS .

        This is your enemy and ours , and who knows if you will not become a prey like we have become a prey . Your governments will not refrain from sacrificing you and your children for their purposes . You should rally against creating training and sustaining Terror and not removing this or that dictator . You have no business removing anyone or deposing this or that Arab ruler, you have the business of keeping your governments off our back, and off your own back as well..Let it be known that you cannot share knowingly or unknowingly, actively or passively, in destroying Syria and Iraq and Libya and Yemen and remain safe!.

        • 0
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          What is the relevance of Omar Lebbe’s diatribe against the West in this page centering on Kishani J?

          Is this because global Islamic fundamentalism/terrorism has been caught on the wrong foot by the outrageous attack on innocent European civilians – on their way to work three days ago. Have this anti-Western anti-Christian conspiratorial bodies alerted their secret cells all over the world to defend the Brussels carnage which followed the equally savage evens in Paris some months ago?

          It is widely known that global Islamic leaders allocated a sum of US$250 billion to strengthen and increase the number of their cells all over the world with the idea to make that final thrust in that insane belief much of the world will be Islamised by 2025. When much hatred against Muslims was felt in Brussels against this week’s bombings a leading Imam of Arabic descent tried to defend the attacks by saying Arab-Muslim-Belgians were denied education, jobs and deliberately kept away from the work force. He, thereby, falsely inferred the brutal attacks were the result and tried to justify the savagery. This incredible claim is belied by the fact there is neither discrimination against Arab-Muslim- Belgians in education or job opportunities. In fact, within the last 25 years Muslim-Belgians have arrived in such large numbers and unnaturally raised their population to become the 2nd largest community (51%) in Brussels. This worried the Belgians who feared they may soon be reduced to minority status. This week’s bloody events sends shock waves among native Brussels-Belgian citizens.

          It is noted despite the fact there is no discrimination in education and job opportunities in France and Britain there were several bombings, attacks and other violence against the local population. This is further proof a sinister campaign is on to de-stabilise Christian Europe.

          Is global Islam accelerating another Crusade. Are we in for a Christian-Muslim war all over the world where sleeping cells of Muslims are activated to create chaos, anarchy and mass murder by centrally controlled forces in the Arab-Muslim world.

          F.N. Stein

      • 1
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        Rajash
        I think that this is a most irresponsible comment.

        There is Hindu terrorism active in India and Buddhist terrorism active in this country and Myanmar. There is Islamic terrorism as much as there has been Christian terrorism much of which is part of the imperialist establishment. There was Tamil terrorism too, and wonder if many would like to be reminded how it destroyed innocent civilians of all ethnicities.

        Some people resort to terror under unbearable stress or emotional inducement.
        Why does most of ‘Islamic terror’ have its source in US imperialism and its corrupt allies in the Middle East?
        The present IS terrorism has much to do with the series of acts of US-led aggression in Muslim countries Asia and North Africa.

        Why is the West soft on Buddhist terrorism and Hindu terrorism, especially under Modi? Does this not make one wonder?

        It is sensible to confine religion to one’s personal life. Political religion is a big threat to humanity.
        Besides, this matter deserves serious discussion free of flippant and insensitive remarks under a heading other than “the-politics-of-kishani-jayasinghe”.

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    Isn’t this wonderful? I don’t understand half the technicalities and not all the artists mentioned here are familiar to me.

    However, I understand enough to sense that an unlikely partnership on a musical project between Izzeth and Ramona Therese may be about to take off. I’m sure that this could lead to many things that will enrich our culture. I’ll be watching eagerly to see how it all evolves.

    • 4
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      Izzeth says:
      “sexual repression which was probably behind much of the hatred directed against the gorgeously structured KJ,”
      Whatever one might think of Mr Hussein, he certainly has a way with words!
      Our Ramona Therese is famous for doggedness. She will not rest until everybody else leaves in desperation.
      I have a theory that she is not human, but a piece of fiendish computer software. She says:
      “When analyzing all the research out there on the origins of Danno Budunge, one finds that Mendelssohn’s piece came *AFTER* Danno Budunge”

      Mendelssohn died in 1847, and Danno Budunge is early 20th century vintage.
      Now, what else but a mis-programmed computer would write that?

      • 3
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        Old Codger :

        This is a comment from IZ’s last article on the subject:

        //From Arun Dias Bandaranyake’s comments on Colombo Telegraph on 4 March 2016. :

        1) Unless we can lay hands on Mendelssohn’s original manuscript (passed on to his friend to be taken to Ceylon around 1830) which does not seem to exist anymore, nothing can be definitive. But we can conjecture the origin of the Mendelsshon’s Duetto Op 38 no 6 with intelligence

        2) There is historical evidence that Mendelsshon was in London in 1829/30 and met Johnson who requested Mendelsshon to create a melody to commemorate an event in Ceylon

        3) Johnson took it to Ceylon by ship and possibly got a musician (has to be a English one) to arrange it as a song (whether in Sinhala or English is not known)- there is evidence that this has happened from correspondence between the two.
        4) Looks like this song/ melody survived and was sung by various people in Ceylon.

        5) Mendelsshohn almost surely did not retain a copy of the composition that he made for his friend Johnson.

        6) Between 1829-1845 Mendelssohn composed 48 miniature works known as ‘songs without words”. Mendelsshon must have retained at least part of the melody in his mind (having composed it) and used that later as the theme (from memory) for his Duetto Op 38 no 6.\\

        Well, in these days of photo-shopping, one wonders if Mendelssohn’s original manuscript will suddenly turn up.

      • 5
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        We can also conjecture that as Mendelssohn had never been to Sri Lanka, he wouldn’t have had a clue of how to have create a melody for this exotic isle. Therefore, Johnson hummed or keyed for Johnson a Lankan melody or two to give Mendelssohn some musical elucidation.

        Buddhists would have found it offensive to take up a tune from a Christian religious service. If it came directly to them from Mendelsohn, it wouldn’t have sat well with them….unless it was reminiscent of a tune they already had.

        • 0
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          Dear Ramona,
          A helluva lot of conjecture in there. Conjecture is not evidence.
          Either Lauji or Mendelssohn were responsible.
          I can also conjecture that you don’t really exist, because a Sinhala Buddhist cannot have a name like Ramona Therese. A real Sinhala Buddhist would find it offensive, as you say.

          • 3
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            Arun Dias Bandaranyake’s is also conjecture. And Izeth Hussain “authenticating” it is also conjecture, not evidence.

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              ramona therese fernando – why do you say that I am “authenticating” Anura Dias Bandaranaike’s conjecture? I have referred to details of that conjecture but I have not authenticated it. All that I have declared is that I saw a similarity between the two melodies.Your Tamil anti-Muslim prejudice – or is it hatred? – has made you place an unwarranted construction on that fact. The reason is that you can’t believe that a Thumbiya/Soni can have authentic nationalist sentiments.
              As a matter of fact I may be on your side in this controversy. It is entirely plausible that Johnson sang a Sinhalese folk song to indicate to Mendelssohn the kind of composition he had in mind. Last night I heard nine versions of Duetto opus 38 no 6. The similarity between the two melodies is unmistakable. I stumbled on something that could be significant with the Gieseking version. The images accompanying it on You tube were Japanese. Whoever collated that probably sensed something oriental about the music. – IH

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                Ramona Therese, my dear. Whatever happened? Izeth H and you were travelling in the same trajectory for a while and now the vituperative “thambiya” (his preferred reference to Muslims)
                showers you with his customary unadulterated vulgar tongue.
                Do you agree with what many commentators believe here – the Octogenarian self-proclaimed “one of the greatest diplomats in the world” has clearly lost his marbles – with so many slamming him in these pages.

                BTW, your claim Ramona is a Buddhist Sinhala name is rubbish.
                It is more of Spanish origin.

                Backlash

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                  Backlash,

                  One would find that certain names are generic to different parts of the world. Chinese have a name Lamona(who is a female ghost), and as some can’t pronounce the “R”, they call me Lamona, and jump back in playful fright.

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                  Backlash – Read Leelananda below Backie boy. Squirm,foam at the mouth, bellow – but nobody takes you seriously Backie boy – IH

              • 0
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                One to comment after leaving out the church influence on its observed by many including Joseph de seram

              • 0
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                Izeth Hussain, sir,

                I think you have listened to too much of this piece, and are stringing that particular piece that sound a little bit like Danno Budunge, into one long score.

                In music, as well as language, you’d find a commonality in tongues……e.g. words like Ma-ma, Da-da,….all come up from human innate instincts. Musical patterns will also come up with similarities world over.

                Yes,…I shouldn’t have said you were authenticating Anura Dias Bandaranaike’s conjecture ….I apologize (I used quotation marks…..guess I felt you were agreeing with him somewhat).

                The most telling point for me is that Mendelssohn’s Duetto opus 38 no 6, came *After* Johnson approached Mendelssohn to create a song for Ceylon.

          • 1
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            So Old Codger,

            Ramona is a Sinhala name. And I am a convert to Buddhism in another country. If I come back to Sri Lanka I will surely add a Buddhist name to be true to the Buddhist heritage.

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            Old Codger – your suspicion that there is something amiss somewhere about Ramona Therese is shrewd. I am reliably informed that she is a Tamil married to a Sinhalese.Hence probably her rabid Sinhala ultra nationalism.My suspicion is that at the core she remains a Tamil.My reason for that suspicion is that Tamil anti-Muslim racism is much much much worse than that of the Sinhalese. That’s why she keeps on sniping at me without the slightest justification.- IH

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              izzeth

              you are wrong.She can’t be anti muslim to write this
              [Edited out]

            • 1
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              I.H,
              My fall-back theory is that she is only pretending to be a rabid SB to provoke debate. Could anyone actually hold the views she puts forth in her response to Rama below?
              “laws and gravity, theory of relativity, Darwinism…..were all non-European concepts. They copied from the colonized lands the ideas that were in a different form, from modern science e.g. Hindu and Buddhist philosophy, Aztec calendar, and the beliefs of the Ecuadorians of survival of the fittest. Europeans got their modern psychology after coming to Buddhist countries and learning their analysis of the human condition.”
              However, she is unfailingly polite , unlike people like Saraswathie.

              • 3
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                Old Codger,

                One must debate to get to the Truth!

            • 2
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              Izeth Hussain, Sir,

              he, he,…..Luv the Tamil factor actually….:)))))

              I LOVE Muslims and Tamils.

              Just speaking from an objective conceptual position. Sorry to have upset you sir. Maṉṉikkavum :(

              • 1
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                Ramona, loving someone just because he/she is a Muslim or Tamil is just as offensive as hating them. You should love mankind for what they are. Their religion or race is immaterial. I know it was probably a mistake as you are a lovely person really.

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                  Huge difference between love and hate Sylvia. Therefore love cannot be offensive.

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              Dear Mr. Hussain,

              Sir, I have had the unfortunate experience of debating with Ms. R.T Fernando on political matters in articles prior.

              She can simply be likened to another Mahindapala. Unfortunately logical and reasoned debate amounts to naught.

              I suggest that you do not invest too much of your valued time in defending your position.

              Also, your article is brilliant as usual and much appreciated.

              • 2
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                TheHorsesFoot – Thank you very much for your appreciation. I wish I had heeded your advice about Ramona Therese earlier. She is a waste of time. – IH

          • 3
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            How low and personal can we get?
            Cannot we discuss maters without getting into personalities?
            Primary school kids will shine against the kind of intellect we witness here.

          • 1
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            Ok Old Codger,

            It seems Arun Dias Bandaranyake’s is fact. I read more about his claims, and it seems that Johnston indeed commissioned Mendelsohn to write a song for Ceylon.

            https://books.google.com/books?id=S2kIAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA65&lpg=PA65&dq=Felix+Mendelssohn+and+his+friend+johnston%2Bceylon&source=bl&ots=8QHK50eemE&sig=S4injkTxP1IhCWM_3jCLBeXkNk8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjzk9qx09XLAhWMsh4KHWVdCHcQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=Felix%20Mendelssohn%20and%20his%20friend%20johnston%2Bceylon&f=false

            My assertion that Mendelsohn’s piece came *AFTER* Danno Budunge, doesn’t have much bearing on whether Danno Budunge is entirely Mendelsohn’s.

            However as I have said before, Mendelsohn wouldn’t have had a clue of how to write a song for our exotic isles. Therefore, Johnston would have sung or keyed some Lankan tunes to Mendelsohn (with lyrics included).

            It seems, in the book, that something provoked much laughter in Mendelsohn.

            “It is really very mad and droll and for two whole days I have laughed at it to myself”- excerpt from Mendelsohn’s diary.

            It was probably the sound of the Lankan tunes and lyrics that Johnston sang or keyed to him, for it sounded so very quaint to Mendelsohn’s ears.

            • 1
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              After the laughter and mirth at the Lankan sound of Danno Budunge, Mendelsohn did honor Johnston’s request, and wrote “Songs without Words Op. 38 No. 6” that sounded boringly German. A Christian organist in Sri Lanka, took up the piece written in European musical score, and made it more true to the traditional version, and created the Hymn for Ceylon.

    • 4
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      Sinhala_Man,

      Nothing wrong with defending a song that sounds gloriously Lankan.

  • 5
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    Iseth Hussain, what a great article.So sad to see the racist communal attack by such a defender of the philosophy, 99% of the adherants don’t know a damn, and if Budha was around he would have been shocked to see the idiots practising what what he did not teach most practising Hindu customs. Ahho Singhala Mahavansa Buddhism.

  • 4
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    Iseth Hussain, what a great article.So sad to see the racist communal attack by such a narrow minded defender of the philosophy, 99% of the adherants don’t know a damn, and if Budha was around he would have been shocked to see the idiots practising what what he did not teach most practising Hindu customs. Ahho Singhala Mahavansa Buddhism.

    • 4
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      I am sure the Buddha would not get a visa to visit Sri Lanka if he applied now.

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        If our immigration officers were ready to deport tourists for carrying just the image of Buddha on their arms, imagine what they’d do to the genuine article.

  • 4
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    The title ‘The Politics Of Kishani Jayasinghe – Part II’ is erroneous and misleading. Definitely Kishani did not have any Political motive or affiliation in singing a song.

    Rather Politics is in the eyes or minds of the beholder or listener. People are Political or Racial only due to their own mindset which colours all their emotions and perceptions.

  • 5
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    What most of the Sinhala Buddists want to hear is this:

    1) The melody of Danno Budunge was composed by King Ravana with his pol katu veenava. The melody resided in the hearts of Sinhala Buddhists until rediscovered by Lauji who slightly modified it.
    2) This same Ravana who invented the dandu monara plane hid his plans somewhere which was robbed by Wright brothers much later and reinvented Ravana’s aeroplane which ran with fuel!
    3) Ravana also had discovered the laws of gravity and theory of relativity long before Newton and Einstein and had these laws/theories written in ola leaf which were found by Newton and Einstein when they visited Sri Lanka in secret visits never recorded in the history as part of a big western conspiracy to put down the Sinhala Buddhist culture.
    4) Shakespeare was a Sinhala Buddist boy born in Mathara who was taken to England by the Europeans!
    Rama

    • 3
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      What flagrant irrelevance of subject and disrespect towards culture and heritage of Sinhalese people!

      However, there is some element of truth.

      When Europeans came around the world, they observed other cultures, stole their ideas, and then developed their own lands with the concepts they got from the east (and the Americas).

      Laws and gravity, theory of relativity, Darwinism…..were all non-European concepts. They copied from the colonized lands the ideas that were in a different form, from modern science e.g. Hindu and Buddhist philosophy, Aztec calendar, and the beliefs of the Ecuadorians of survival of the fittest. Europeans got their modern psychology after coming to Buddhist countries and learning their analysis of the human condition. Previously, it was all about fighting, conquering, and torturing others.

      Indeed, even in music, European music was of minor scales, till colonization of places like Sri Lanka. After that, Spanish and Portuguese took the major scales to Europe. Nobody knew what to do with it, till it hit the inventive Germans- Beethoven and others,- who created classical music and the modern piano with the major and minor keys.

      Medieval European music (minor key): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNW0js0qFec

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZIcA3O3A2g

      After the accumulation of other races’ ideas, creating fuel driven aeroplanes and going to the moon was easy to do.

      • 1
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        How right you were, Ram!!!!!

  • 8
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    The clearly racial dismissal of Mr. Izzeth Husseins’s(IH) article by Saraswathie above is revolting and horrifying by any civilised standard. Having been a regular reader of CT,I and undoubted many others have noticed that both Sinhala and Tamil readers obviously unable to bear the utmost quality of IZ’s writings have either subtly or more directly resorted to this deplorable racist line. It is one thing to disagree with a writer’s views : its another to condemn a writer through racial slur. It seems patently clear that they attack him purely because he is Muslim and unable to come to terms with fact that a Muslim can articulate his or her thinking so well.

    It is well known that the Moor/Muslim community was the last of the communities in Ceylon to take advantage of the opportunities provided by the British for advancement through education. IH was a pioneer beneficiary in this respect and what a contribution he has made to the advancement of his community and his country.

    He was the first from his community to graduate with a First Class in English under the legendary Prof. EFC Ludowyke. He was the first Muslim to join the Ceylon Overseas Service and served for 36 years(1952 – 1988)His acutely focussed reports from Peking, Paris, London, Moscow or Manila , among many other places, were made compulsory reading for Foreign Service cadets by giants in the service like Vernon Mendis and Arthur Basnanayake. Being of the old brigade I am personally aware that IH is regarded as the “Author” of the Colombo Declaration of the 1976 Non Aligned Conference in Colombo. He was assisted by then rookies in the Service who later carved out a name of their own like Nihal Rodrigo, Danehan Casie Chetty, Jayantha Dhanapala, Sarala Fernanado etc. Even Henry Kissinger praised the visionary quality of the Colombo Declaration when he met Mrs. Sirima Bandaranaike. Among other matters it contained a proposal for a NAM Bank for development .Mrs. B. regarded IH as of super quality and relied much on his wisdom , just as she did with Vernon Mendis, Arthur Basnanayake,C Mannickalingam, Elmo Zieghlar, Andrew Joseph, Ben Fonseka etc. Mrs. B as her record shows was the best manager of Ceylon’s foreign policy in terms of how she dealt with India and China and IH served in both places when she was Prime Minister.

    In regard to Kishani’s rendition of Danno Budunge, I shall not comment except requesting readers to refer to the factually and historically rich article by Arun Dias Bandaranaike that appeared in CT on 4th March.He has included recordings of the different renditions of the song, proving that Kishani’s rendition was not the first time that it was sung outside the “original style”.

    By the way,just because Saraswathie is supposed to have over 2 hours Mendhelson’s works (he treats them with contempt by calling them “songs”!!) does not make him an authority of the composer’s works by that factor claim alone. That could well be like the dilettante super rich Mudalali with a, say grade 4 education, having a first class library in his palatial home and claiming to be educated!

    This comment is not meant to praise IH. His writings can be controversial but they need to be responded to in a civilised manner, by using facts, and not racial slur. Lets remember that that CT has plenty of room for educated debate. Lets keep it so please . With our claim to a 2500 year old civilization and a supposedly 93% literacy, we surely are capable of it.

    • 6
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      Leelananda

      RE: The Politics Of Kishani Jayasinghe – Part II by Izeth Hussein

      “He was the first from his community to graduate with a First Class in English under the legendary Prof. EFC Ludowyke. He was the first Muslim to join the Ceylon Overseas Service and served for 36 years(1952 – 1988)”

      Thank you for your excellent comment and information on the education, background and experience of Izeth Hussein. His writings shows that the depth of his understanding of the subjects he writes about after careful research. “Even Henry Kissinger praised the visionary quality of the Colombo Declaration when he met Mrs. Sirima Bandaranaike.”

      Amarasiri normally interprets when a commenter criticizes an idea or issue with ad hominem attacks, (an argument directed against a person rather than the position they are maintaining), as being shallow and devoid of content, unable to counter rationally, logically and intellectually. Saraswathie’s comment is such an example, among many others. They are very easy to spot.

      Amarasiri has identified several categories of ad hominem attacks on Izeth Hussein by the following groups.

      1. Those that attack Izeth Hussein because he is happen to be born a Muslim. In that group are mostly Sri Lankan Tamils, (not Indian Tamils or Indians) for his pointing out the Sri Lankan Tamil Racism towards the Sri Lankan Muslims, which is far greater than the racism shown by the Sinhala people.

      What is interesting here is that what H L D Mahindapala is claiming as the Valhalla Casteism and Racism to the “low caste” Tamils, must be spilling over to the Muslims.

      2. The Wahhabis and their Clones, for pointing out that what they follow is not Islam, and is Terrorism. ( Amarasiri calls that Iblis, Satan following Wahhabis and their Clones). Izeth Hussein had 3 or 4 excellent articles, and along with Amarasiri’s pointed comments, with support from the Quran and Hadith, the Wahhabis and their clones got very agitated. While they directed ad hominem attacks on Izeth Hussein, they are utterly confused as to where to direct the ad hominem attacks on Amarasiri, the Egalitarian Rationalist Philosopher, and the Lover of Wisdom.

      They are generally devoid of intellect, just memorized whatever their Ulama or Sheikhs tell them, memorizes whole books when they are readily available, and lose their brain’s critical thinking capacity. Their “Sheikh” Abdul Wahhab, who copied from “Sheikh” Ibn Taymiah, is contradicting the Quran in their actions, and even one of the great Theologians and Philosopher, Al-Ghazali(On Philosophy he was shown to be incorrect by another great Philosopher Averroes), and wanted to kill the Sufis, along with the Shia and other non-Wahhabis. Saudi Wahhabis and ISIS is precisely carrying out these Satan inspired Terrorist activities in modern times.

      The best evidence for this is the average GMAT scores of Saudi Wahhabi graduates compared to the rest of the World plotted against the Native IQs. The Sausage Wahhabis are at the bottom of the IQ group as well as at the bottom of the World!

      3. This group generally consists of those who do not want to show that Muslims are progressive and have intellect. They want to show that all Muslims are like the Wahhabi Fundamentalists, devoid of Intellect and reason. They are funded by Norway, Israel, the Christian Fundamentalist West and the Neocons who are promoters of Islamophobia.

      References: Reason Vs. Revelation

      Quick Post: L&V’s National IQs predict GMAT scores across 173 nations

      http://humanvarieties.org/2014/02/02/quick-post-lvs-national-iqs-predicts-gmat-scores-across-173-nations/

      The GMAT test is administered in English and is designed for programs that teach in English. But the required English skill level is much less than what students will need in the classroom. The exam requires just enough English to allow us to adequately and comprehensively assess Verbal reasoning, Quantitative reasoning and Integrated Reasoning skills….

      Average GMAT Score Wahhabi Saudi Arabia = 311
      Average GMAT Score Wahhabi Clone Taliban-Afganistan = 309
      Average GMAT Score Sunni Turkey = 550
      Average GMAT Score Shia Iran = 520
      Average GMAT Score Sunni Morocco = 509
      Average GMAT Score Sunni Indonesia = 508

      Average GMAT Score India = 577
      Average GMAT Score USA = 532
      Average GMAT Score Sri Lanka = 477

      Regression Plot: The regression plot for GMAT scores and L&V’s (2012) Estimated National IQs is shown below.

      http://humanvarieties.org/2014/02/02/quick-post-lvs-national-iqs-predicts-gmat-scores-across-173-nations/

    • 4
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      Izeth Hussain, Sir,

      Be at peace. I understand your resentment towards some of our Sinhalese. It wouldn’t have been easy dealing with the lot of them, as a Muslim diplomat. Your position as a diplomat is impressive. You have done much for the country. It’s a pity that any slights and slurs from a few Sinhalese might have embittered you.

      However, you must remain objective at all times, and understand their turbulent history after colonization. You have to be patient, and show them a better way. They are after all, 80% of Lankan’s population. Surely you must see the difference in your dealings with the diplomatic high-class circles of Sinhalese, from the average man on the street who is truly struggling.

      For every Sinhala man who uses racial pride to substantiate his miserable position (due to effects of colonization), are 10 other Sinhala men who, when he hears all the rhetoric, feels truly unworthy, and scratches his head in perplexity.

      • 3
        1

        Ramona TF – your comments about my allegedly excessive reactions to Sinhalese racism seem to be completely irrelevant to the issues under discussion. What have you in mind? I must clarify my position on Sinhalese racism.I was subjected to grotesque racist discrimination by the 1977 UNP Government. But I have acknowledged, and will keep on acknowledging,that the treatment I received from earlier SLFP Governments was out of the world in being fair and more than fair. See Leelananda’s comment. That showed the Sinhalese capacity to transcend racism.
        I am surprised that your focus is on Sinhalese racism and not on Tamil racism which has been disgracing CT columns over a long period. There was serious discussion usually at a high intellectual level of the first part of my article on Kishani J. Suddenly there was an extremely insulting comment. That was from a Tamil. It was followed by another insulting and even threatening comment. Also from a Tamil.The second part evoked a horrifying Islamophobic outburst from a Tamil, Saraswathi. It provoked fitting rejoinders, all from Sinhalese, none from Tamils like you as far as I could make out. Do you choose to ignore Tamil racism because you are yourself a crypto Tamil racist? I ask because I was horrified by the grotesque unfairness of one of your comments on the first part of my article. – IH

        • 0
          0

          Sir,

          My comment of your excessive reactions to Sinhala racism is very relevant to the issue at hand. I felt that certain Sinhalese must have done something to you to make you so bitter.

          That you mentioned that you were subjected to grotesque racism by the 1977 UNP government, further clarifies my comments. You have my sympathy. I find it hard to believe that you would succumb to an aversion of this kind, out of intrinsic desire.

          I only beg you to remember that that kind of racism only belongs to certain high-class circles, and is hardly the rhetoric of the common-man of the soil (although they can also be influenced- but generally the Sinhalese are a peaceful and nonracist community).

          In this set of articles, you are querying the authenticity of Sinhala culture in their songs. You also write on many other articles on CT, with enquiry towards the Sinhalese right towards land and heritage.

          My comment on you attempting to “authenticate” Arun Dias Bandaranyake’s article, is therefore hardly grotesque. It is a fact of what you write. I apologized for it, however.

          Many of us, in spite our many hassles and outright discrimination – both in Sri Lanka and in problems with Lankan communities out of Sri Lanka, – still prefer to lay allegiance to the Truth, as we know it. I see Sri Lanka being of Sinhala culture and heritage (with leeway for other cultures and heritages), as England and America are of English culture and heritage (with also leeway for other cultures and heritages). I see Sinhalese culture as very authentic to them, but that it is good to debate any points if there is any doubt.

          I have openly condemned on CT, both Tamil and Sinhalese racism (and also Muslim and Burgher racism). However, in this article, I show my support for you, by only talking about any Sinhalese racism that you might have undergone.

          Because the issue of Tamil racism doesn’t come on, in this article, doesn’t mean that you should equivocate as such, as I have been commenting on Tamil racism in so many other articles on CT- some of them your articles.

          Being mixed blood – mostly Burgher, with Tamil and Sinhalese blood – racism is something detached from me, and I find it rather peculiar. But, hey, if you want to call me Tamil, that’s very welcome too.

          • 2
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            Ramona TF – you write about my being “so bitter”. That’s the impression given by people who fight against injustice. You won’t understand that. But sorry to disappoint you, Ramona dear, I am having a damn good time, and furthermore I get praised for it.See Leelananda etc.
            You write that I am “querying the authenticity of Sinhala culture in their songs”. It’s mind-boggling. How on earth did you come to that conclusion? I have noted the similarity between the two melodies, a similarity that is so obvious that only the intensely prejudiced can dispute it. Furthermore I have actually sided with you in declaring that it is quite plausible that Johnson sang or keyed a Sinhalese folk song to Mendelssohn.
            I have been warned by more than one person in these columns that I should ignore you because you are incapable of serious dialogue. I now heed their advice. – IH

            • 0
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              Izeth Hussain, Sir,

              When people attempt to give good interpretation through debate, you call them prejudiced. You jump back saying that you are sniped at. You then attempt to take away their credibility through race. Sir, those are classic cases of Abusive ad Hominem.

              There is much evidence to prove that your analysis of the origins of Danno Budunge is not very plausible. You also queried the authenticity of our National Anthem which is 100% from the Lankan soul.

              You only sided with me in declaring that it is quite plausible that Johnson sang or keyed a Sinhalese folk song to Mendelssohn, after you placed an ad hominem tactic on me with the race card. Using the race card on me, however, gives me a more effective hold on my arguments.

              I understand your need for fight injustice, but there are more worthy ways of doing so. You must carry on as you did in the past.

              • 0
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                However, what would good debate be without some robust abusive ad hominem…..(social and political correctness kills the inspiration)…….

        • 4
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          “grotesque racist discrimination by the 1977 UNP Government.”
          “treatment I received from earlier SLFP Governments was out of the world in being fair and more than fair.”

          The 1977 UNP regime hurt Tamils badly but for it to hurt IH, the reasons are perhaps in the second statement.

          For a person claiming diplomatic career experience, the politeness and diplomacy in IH’s writing is stunning.

          If one attacks IH he/she is a racist. Simple as that.
          I have come across more Sinhalese Saraswathis than Tamil.
          A Saraswathi qualifies as Tamil through ‘attacking’ IH.

          Frankly, Ramona, this is someone’s ‘ego trip’ in which you are only a prop.
          Do not waste time on trivia or feel obliged to explain yourself against every comment.

          • 2
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            SJ – on my diplomatic career, see Leelananda. He was an insider at the time of the Colombo Summit. He knows what he is talking about, you don’t. – IH

          • 1
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            I was not talking about your career, but about your manner of communication.

            • 1
              1

              SJ – I have never come across a Saraswathie who is a Sinhalese. I could be mistaken. There are of course Sinhalese racists. Like you perhaps. I could sometimes be mistaken about someone’s racism. It could sometimes be an extreme confusion of mind, as in the case of poor Ramona Therese, or it could be simply a deep love of injustice. Perhaps that applies to you. That will be shown by the way you react to the following clarification about my manner of communication.1/ I have never initiated attacks against anyone; only responded to them. 2/ I have always graduated my responses according to whether the attacks were insulting or not, and I have never delivered whackings except where the whackings were richly merited. 3/ I have never used gutter language in my responses. – IH

    • 9
      5

      There is much to believe both Leelananda and Izeth Hussain are one and the same. But that is trivia and no more than Laurel and Hardy.

      F.N. Stein

      • 2
        2

        No, Leelananda = Bandu de Silva

      • 9
        4

        F.N.Stein
        Laurel and Hardy? Doesn’t that fit Amarasiri and Izeth?

      • 5
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        FN Stein
        I should warn you that satire is lost on many people here, especially Tamil intellectuals.
        They take everything seriously with a kind of mathematical precision.

        Deane
        A & I are a little more Punch and Judy.

    • 11
      5

      Leelananda
      ..and what a contribution he has made to the advancement of his community….

      As regards to your recommendation of IH’s service in the foreign service, we take your word for it. However we note with concern, the fact that it lacks the accolade of ” five of the best”. I have heard the services of Jayantha Dhanapala, Ben Fonseka, Vernon Mendis and even the late genial Suvith Gautamadasa but Izeth Hussain was a run of the mill Ambassador! Still we accept your word for his excellence in his other field. However as for the quote above, being a Sri Lankan Muslim, I have never heard of IH making any notable contribution to the Muslim Community. In fact by his various articles it is common knowledge among the Muslim intelligentsia, he has been doing immense damage with his warped knowledge of Islam and some of the dangerous conclusions he draws in his final analysis. Actually in the contemporary scene, it is a universally accepted fact that the Muslim community lacks proper leadership. In these circumstances I would like to express my thanks to that gentleman, Mr. M.A. Sumanthiran, who with exceptional courage stood for the Muslims during the worst days of the megalomaniacal dictatorship of the previous regime.

      • 6
        9

        J. Deane – no one can take you seriously Deane boy. Are you Jamaat Deane or Jealous Deane? – IH

        • 10
          3

          Tell me Izzi boy whether they gave you lessons on backscratching and name calling during your orientation sessions prior to being posted in the foreign service?

      • 2
        8

        J.Deane

        Can you please take the GMAT Screening Exam and show that you are better, i.e., have better critical thinking, reasoning and analytical abilities, than the Satan-Iblis Following Saudi Wahhabis, even though you have been misled by the Saudi petrodollars? There seems to be a lot of confusing among the Iblis, Satan Following Wahhabies as to the meaning of Reverence and Worship.

        Have the Wahhabies heard about Al-Ghazali and Averroes? They were Islamic Theologians and philosophers. Probably not. They only know “Sheikh” Abdul Wahhab.

        You and your fellow Sri Lankan Wahhabies may be able to tell your Saudi Wahhabies, that even though we all are Iblis, Satan Following Wahhabi, because we are Sri Lankans, we are smarter than the Saudi Wahhabi, who hail from Najd, region of Arabia, the Horn of Satan.

        Quick Post: L&V’s National IQs predict GMAT scores across 173 nations
        Posted by Chuck

        http://humanvarieties.org/2014/02/02/quick-post-lvs-national-iqs-predicts-gmat-scores-across-173-nations/

        Regression Plot: The regression plot for GMAT scores and L&V’s (2012) Estimated National IQs is shown below.

        https://humanvarietiesdotorg.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/gmatregressionplot.png

        See where the Saudi Wahhabies are? At the Bottom! Why? Because they follow Iblis, Satan?

      • 2
        8

        J.Deane

        “Actually in the contemporary scene, it is a universally accepted fact that the Muslim community lacks proper leadership.”

        Do you know Why? Lack of Scientists, Philosophers and Thinkers Critical thinkers.

        All you have got is sheep, who just Follow the Ulama, Satan Iblis Following Wahhabi Ulama, courtesy of Saudi Petrodollars.

        Wha has the Iblis Satan Following Wahhabi done? Take the Muslims back to the stone age, and make them lose their intelligence.

        During the Islamic Golden age, there were no Wahhabies. Then the Ulama took over, and then it was decline.

        Stupidest Muslim Vs Neil Tyson – How ideology can ruin intellectual power. This is the 21st Century- Wahhabi.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyCxrL9-C84

        Published on Nov 10, 2014

        This is not a debate between some Muslim and Neil Tyson. But this video shows the thinking of some very well educated 21’st century Muslim (I don’t know he is ignorant, stupid or dishonest. But he is one for sure) and Neil Tyson speaking in a lecture about how Muslims intellectual power ruined by an ideology. You can watch the Full video of this Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s amazing lecture filled with fun and knowledge by clicking on the link below.

        Ken Miller on Human Evolution

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zi8FfMBYCkk

        Uploaded on Feb 14, 2007
        Dr. Ken Miller talks about the relationship between Homo sapiens and the other primates. He discusses a recent finding of the Human Genome Project which identifies the exact point of fusion of two primate chromosomes that resulted in human chromosome #2.

        • 9
          3

          Amarasiri, why don’t you do the same. It will be interesting to see the GMAT report of your’s and that of your mentor Izzi boy too! And when you receive the report consider going to one of the many institutions in Colombo that teach you comprehension and the art of being relevant when replying. When you graduate you might even consider a Masters course on how to do research on any of multitude of subjects you profess to know. Your Wikipedia research and cut and paste reporting has become too stale and boring and judging by the hits you receive, no one seems to be interested in the drivel you spew. One also notices your unabated loyalty to take up the cudgels on behalf of Izi boy whether the subject concerns you or not. Hence you might as well take the course on objective criticism as well! Cheers

          • 3
            8

            J.Deane

            1. “Amarasiri, why don’t you do the same. It will be interesting to see the GMAT report of your’s “

            It was reported to BOTH to Abu and you, J.Deane. in a simple algebraic form (Al-jabar, “union of broken parts”) before. Please refer to Amarasiri’s previous posts. Is your intellect so low that even a simple algebraic expression cannot be solved? Do Wahhabis and their clones believe that Stupidity is a Virtue?

            Algebra (from Arabic “al-jabr” meaning “reunion of broken parts”) is one of the broad parts of mathematics, together with number theory, geometry and analysis. In its most general form, algebra is the study of mathematical symbols and the rules for manipulating these symbols; it is a unifying thread of almost all of mathematics.

            Algebra was NOT invented by the Wahhabis, but by the Muslim and Islamic Scientists and Philosophers who could THINK.

            2. “One also notices your unabated loyalty to take up the cudgels on behalf of Izi boy whether the subject concerns you or not.”

            Why not address the issues being discussed and challenged upon? Why ad hominem’s. This is an argument or reaction directed against a person, Izeth, rather than the position they are maintaining. Your lack of Intellect? That is the Wahhabi Phenomenon. That is precisely what the Iblis, Satan , Devil wants Muslims to do. Follow Wahhabism and its clones, kill each other and become stupid, like the ISIS, a clone of Wahhabism is doing.

            As per Islamic Ideology, Iblis, Satan following Wahhabies and their clones will end up in Hell Fire. Satan will be fine, as he was made out of smokeless fire, but the Wahhabies and their clones will burn for ever.

            al-azhar cleric about wahabis/salafis

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAvWmZfGjTU

            Devil (Islam), What the Wahhabies and their Clones Follow.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil_(Islam)

            The primary characteristic of the Devil is hubris. His primary activity is to incite humans and jinn to commit evil through deception, which is referred to as “whispering into the hearts”. The Quran mentions that Satans are the assistants of those who disbelieve in God: “We have made the evil ones friends to those without faith.

        • 6
          2

          “Actually in the contemporary scene, it is a universally accepted fact that the Muslim community lacks proper leadership.” Do you know Why? Lack of Scientists, Philosophers and Thinkers Critical thinkers.
          Lack of comprehension
          The writer refers to political leadership. Amarasiri as usual jumps the gun due to his lack of ability to comprehend.
          Non relevant reply
          Algebra (from Arabic “al-jabr” meaning “reunion of broken parts”) is one of the broad parts of mathematics, together with number theory, geometry and analysis. In its most general form, algebra is the study of mathematical symbols and the rules for manipulating these symbols; it is a unifying thread of almost all of mathematics.
          This has absolutely no relevance to ” the politics of Kishani Jayasinghe “
          Conclusion
          Amarasiri is well advised to read my reply again and get some scholastic help. Talking about ad hominem attacks, he seems to have forgotten the vituperative invectives he hurls against Sheik Muhammad and his Students. His soft peddling the ISIS (Daeesh), Al Qaeeda, Shabab and their clones makes one wonder on whose side he is in? Without analyzing their philosophy he is just connecting their mistaken ideology to Sheik Wahab. This is the same position of the Iranians, for whom Amarasiri is holding a brief. He should stop mis quoting the Quran. Why isn’t he quoting from the works of Sheik,Muhammad and Sheik Ibn Taymiyyah? The answer is obvious since he will be exposed and he will be forced to dump his library of cut and paste collections

          • 2
            4

            J.Deane

            “This is the same position of the Iranians, for whom Amarasiri is holding a brief. He should stop mis quoting the Quran. Why isn’t he quoting from the works of Sheik,Muhammad and Sheik Ibn Taymiyyah? “

            Amarasiri is an Egalitarian Rationalist Philosopher, who is applying the principles to Wahhabism and its clones. What comes in the final analysis is that,

            1. Ibn Taymiah was infected by Satan, Iblis

            2. Abdul Wahhab was infected by Iblis, as well and Abdul Wahhab Copied Inb Taymiah ideas.

            Both Ibmn Taymoah and abdul Wahhas Wahhabi Iblis Ideology will be discredited if one looks into Al-Ghazali and Averroes interpretation of Quran and Islamic Philosophy.

            The Wahhabi Ulema knows no Islamic Philosophy, They are just sheep.

            They guide the “Muslims”.

            No wonder the Muslims are backward if they follow these Iblises, instead of following God.

            Al-Ghazali , in fact claimed that the Sufis had it righter. The Wahhabis want to kill the Sufis and others. Only Satan, Iblis would and his followers would do that.

      • 0
        4

        J.Deane

        “..and what a contribution he has made to the advancement of his community….”

        ..and what a contribution he Wahhabies and their clones Taliban, ISIS made to the advancement of their communities….

        This is what sharia law looks like!! The religion of peace!! LOLZ!!

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAB4YJfz-NQ

        Published on Jan 9, 2015

        Watch two butches being punished because they sold meat that wasn’t prepared in the Islamic way!!
        Taken from the full documentary

        youtube.com/watch?v=faxPWdnX_Kc

        Shariah Law – Islamic Justice – Pure Evil.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qgLWcsbOD8k

    • 7
      6

      Leelananda – thanks very much. Very glad to see your view that it’s the quality of my writings that makes them unbearable to Sinhalese and Tamil racists. That certainly applies to the notorious racist Mahindapala. But I can’t think of any other Sinhalese to whom that applies. On the other hand the Tamils who have been driven to hysterical hatred and mad dog rage by my articles have been legion. The depth of Tamil racism is horrifying. It badly requires analysis.
      To the reader – He is Leelananda de Silva who handled the economic aspects of the Non-Aligned Summit.One of the major achievements of that Summit was to bring to the forefront the economic dimension of the Non-Aligned Movement. The credit for that achievement should go mainly to Leelananda. – IH

  • 1
    0

    I do not blame Ramona Therese for her thinking as she was brought up as a Roman catholic.They are a group that are restricted to free thought,hence her becoming a buddhist.In my day the Roman catholics conducted mass in Latin and had no music other than the priest chanting again in Latin The Bible reading was also restricted and for O/Levels never did the gospels.Fortunately I see now them adopting music and English in their service. I observed this in California and wonder if it is worldwide.The restrictive nature of the church has made many adherents move on to other bible thumping evangelist cults and sects to increase their fold.Srilanka has a long way to go from their primitive and tribal beliefs.Just imagine Mahendra Rajapakse indulges in sorcery and witchcraft what sort of leadership is that?

    • 3
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      I suppose the Portuguese were Hindu and the Spaniards and Latin Americans Jain.
      Some of the best modern Sinhala music was from Catholics.
      I wonder who composed music for Rekawa.

      Kindly avoid offensive personal remarks.
      It hurts people and that is not civilized behaviour.

    • 2
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      jay gunasekara,

      My mother was Anglican. Hence, I used to be taken to both Catholic and Anglican church services. I have been to both Catholic and Anglican schools.

      Vatican 2 in 1962 (my y.o.b.) modernized the Catholic church. Therefore we sang beautiful hymns both old and new, in the Catholic church, and also studied the bible. In the Catholic school I went to, we studied both the old and new testaments.

      Buddhism is somewhat innate in me, hence my conversion (although I am not such a good Buddhist, and tend to fall back on Jesus and the saints, at times,….and Christmas hymns and the novena prayers…It’s the existence of God, I question, but Jesus and the saints are more plausible as they were actual people…maybe in my next life, I will be a true Buddhist).

      But as per you: you must get away from your personalized nirvana trajectory, and include your middle-path technique with the whole society of Buddhists instead of deserting them and leaving them in abject despair.

      • 0
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        ramona

        “It’s the existence of God, I question,”

        why do you question something that is abundantly clear when you just look around you,if you have a brain in your head.have you got to flit from religion to religion just to find out.It is not the existence of god that we should question,but how to reach out to god and communicate with god.

        anyway when you say the following”maybe in my next life, I will be a true Buddhist).” you contradict yourself.If god did not exist, when you die you just become a part of the earth.Who is going to give you another birth?

        • 0
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          shankar,

          God is merely an automatic function of the universe. My clinging to existential aggregates, causes me to unfortunately spring back to life again. Must start removing the aggregates so as to reach Nirvana (Buddha’s word).

          Jesus and all the saints had so much love for humanity, that they unfortunately/fortunately are in a perpetual state to keep helping mankind. (but one day, they might decide to move out of it).

          • 0
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            But if one feels they have felt/feel the divine presence of God, then that is their calling. Maybe God is Nirvana personified by humans, so as to be understood in a simpler form. Who knows what’s in all that Dark Matter in the universe. Since we don’t know much, it’s better to be sincere to oneself, and follow the Middle-Path prescribed by the Buddha.

            • 1
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              ramona

              trying to reach out to god and at the same time following Lord Bhuddha’s teachings is not mutually exclusive paths to follow.ex i try to do both.

              all roads lead to rome they say.what does it matter which road we follow as long as we reach rome,you and i,hand in hand,weary and tired,happy at last to know that we have got fitter and healthier by the journey and also reached the destination we always craved for.

              • 0
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                hmmm…no Shankar, there is some exclusivity. Lord Buddha’s path makes one more self-reliant. When one strays from the Middle-Path, one is more aware of it. God’s orbitz, on the other hand, puts one entirely at the mercy of God. One is less aware of one’s wrong-doings, and more reliant on Divine Forgiveness. In Buddhism, Deliverance comes from within the Self.

                • 1
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                  ramona
                  “One is less aware of one’s wrong-doings, and more reliant on Divine Forgiveness.”

                  forgiveness is only in christianity.In hinduism it is karma,and so there is awareness of one’s wrongdoings. in bhuddhism there is awareness of ones wrongdoings,but yet you saw the behaviour of sinhala bhuddhists because they don’t believe in karma and hence the consequences to them of their actions.So you see if you cherry pick what you believe in out of all the religions,then they are not mutually exclusive,but if you try to follow the religions word for word as written in religious books then as you rightly pointed out in some areas practising two relegions could become difficult and mutually exclusive.If you adopt my cherry picking method you can not only practice two religions,but four in fact.

                  i try to practice the following(note the word try,because it is so hard to practice what one preaches to others)these are some examples of my cherry picks from all the religions.

                  1.hinduism.i try my level best between waking up in the morning and going to sleep at night,not to give pain to some other living creature.If i can also help someone needy for help i try to do it.

                  2.bhuddhism try my best to follow lord bhuddha’s teaching to purify mind and attain a higher level as a human being.

                  3.christianity.believe in not taking revenge on someone who has done me harm and try my best to forget it and move on.however unable to forgive.also believe in being careful not to open the door and let in Lucifer,the powerful angel that will make us his agent for evil deeds.

                  4.islam. believe in the ramadan fasting,but still not embarked on it,because if we feel acute hunger pangs only we will know how others are suffering without food in this world.Hope to start trying this year from 18th june to 17th july. wish me success.This is one of the 5 pillars of islam and after i try this i will look into the other 4.

                  so,ramona is there anything here that is mutually exclusive.will i be lying if i say i am trying to practice all religions.

                  as i said earlier all roads lead to rome(the kingdom of god)and you and i hand in hand will take our weary tired limbs to this final destination.However remember jesus told the rich man who asked him for eternal life that it is difficult to admit a rich person to the kingdom of god,so he should give all his wealth away to the poor and follow him.The rich man’s face fell and he said he cannot and so he did not get eternal life.So you and i have to get rid of all our assets as we walk along towards eternal life.

                  • 0
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                    Great Shankar, but I wasn’t speaking of the practical applications of each religion- I wasn’t cherry picking, but speaking about their pure philosophies.

                    It’s like the song Danno Budunge – If one can separate the Pure Tune of Danno Budunge from what one desires it to be, one will remove delusion. One will realize it is purely a Lankan song.

                    Hinduism- reliance on gods (although some reliance on self is included). And the god input also puts them on a better karmic journey.

                    Islam – Divine Forgiveness from God only contingent on strict adherence to the path.

                    Christians – saints and angles assistance + Divine Forgiveness from God…..adherence to the path not too strict.

                    Buddhism – entirely through the self that one gains realization + advice from Buddhist teachers

                    And the pure philosophies spill out onto the practical applications.

                    Therefore, it is seen that it is in the best interests of all other religions to give honor and include the Buddhist path into their religions.

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                      ramona

                      “Therefore, it is seen that it is in the best interests of all other religions to give honor and include the Buddhist path into their religions.”

                      exactly. that is why i try to follow it too. extremely important for every human being. My only regret is starting so late.I always had the interest but never the opportunity to learn it.I remember in i think in 1990’s,i visited colombo and the smoke was billowing from fort with the central bank bombings.That is why i remember as the 1990’s when i went to all the bookshops and tried to find a good book on bhuddhism.There were a lot written by so many i got fed up because glancing through them i felt all the authors were writing different things.I then went to some place in fort near the old parliament too and looked at some books,but was not satisfied.I think the problem is that there should be only one book written like the koran or bible,with the original pali transations of the Lord Bhuddha without all this confusing jargon from everybody.

                      anyway unsuccessful as i was in my quest for knowledge and with all the problems involved with bringing up two kids i left it aside and forgot about it.It was only after the kids were settled that i managed to find the time to get back at my interest in what the Lord Bhuddha found out to enlighten him.This time it was much easier to research through the internet and weed out the wheat from the chaff and better late than never.If i was successful in my quest in the 1990’s it would have helped me a lot and in hindsight i would have lived my life differently and not made so many silly and sometimes grave mistakes.

                      i maybe wrong here,but the more i read about bhuddhism it sounds more like a philosophy than a religion.There seems to be hardly a word about god.I was under the impression that a religion should revolve around god
                      otherwise it can’t be a religion.So it is somewhat confusing in that regard for me.I wonder how it became a religion,instead of a way of life to make you step by step attain a higher level as a human being?

                      therefore just as you say bhuddhism should be included in all other religions,i think bhuddhists also should include some other religion with bhuddhism to get the maximum benefits.i am a devotee of kali and when i go to srilanka i go to the mayura temple which is next to the former wellawatta spinning and weaving mills.The temple is built around a bo tree because i think they found something hindu like growing from it or something like that,i’am not sure.When i burn the ghee lamp to kali most of the people doing the same are also sinhala bhuddhists.

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                      Shankar,

                      You’ve been through a lot of soul searching, haven’t you. Glad are spending much time searching for the meaning of things. Guess that Dark Matter and those gravitational waves makes one even more suspicious that there are different worlds around us. Glad you have this time to contemplate all of existential mysteries through religion, after a hectic family life, and especially, after life in war-time Sri Lanka.

                      For me, I have been staunchly Catholic, and quite unwavering…..attempted to rationalize each part of the doctrine for a long time (actually it is possible to rationalize…e.g. the Holy Spirit – with all the Unseen around, why can’t there be a font of Divine Grace out there to purify and help us ).

                      Trouble is, with such Theistic religions, it’s a hit or miss at prayers being answered- and I have made very legitimate and simple prayers. It’s good to have gods, angels, saints, and of course the Almighty, but they are just illusions/delusions to help us along the way……maybe they are truly there, but I want to move beyond them (they give me no peace).

                      Didn’t study much about Buddhism from books….texts are boring. They are intricate, and one has to go step-by-step in analysis to get their true worth. There’s also the Buddhist Dhammapada which is like the Bible and Koran, and it also needs a lot of patient reading and explanation. But have listened to a lot of the dhamma from the Buddhist priests. When I heard it, it enfolded me with much peace and equanimity. Also there are the meditations where one becomes self-aware (sometimes it provokes one’s worse nature to start acting up, but with regular practice, one settles down, I have heard).

                      Buddhism is a religion, I think, because even if there is no god/s, there is still the after-life in rebirths. Philosophy is purely about rationalizing existence and showing a correct path- but nothing about what happens after we die.

                      Yes, many Buddhists also go to other religions to get that extra mystical experience. But Sri Lankan Theravada Buddhism keeps Buddhists on the correct path. If there was no purity of Buddhism with the Theravada path, Buddhism would easily fall back into Hinduism (after all Buddhism is purified Hinduism).

                      I mean, instead of praying to external beings, where the possibility of a miracle is too few and far between, better to rely on the self that we truly know, and work our way with our own initiative I say. Otherwise one is constantly in anticipation-they say they are not, and they let e.g. God’s will be done…but still there is that anticipatory quality- they call it hope…it lacks idealism).

                      In all the other religions, one accumulates all kinds of aggregates (even if good). When ones dies, one takes that heightened/lowered set of aggregates to another spiritual level- heaven or hell. Or in Hinduism’s case, reborn to better/worser castes, or better/worser realms, both seen and unseen.

                      But in Buddhism, one is supposed to gradually removes aggregates in a neutral and equanimous fashion, and quietly fade away to a realm beyond time and space and anything else we know (I think it is to extinguish to nothingness, but I am not too sure, …and that’s quite all right for me to go to nothingness- now that is truly profound!).

                      Other religions can enhance theirs with Buddhist doctrines. But Buddhism cannot include other religions, because it’s too pure and cannot be tampered with. Once you put God, gods, angels and saints into it, it is Mahayana Buddhism which is almost like Hinduism (and Mahayana Buddhism only exists because the Theravada blue-print is there to prop it up).

  • 4
    4

    I am amazed!

    Several of my friends (Gaffoor, Mansoor, Rahuman et al) tell me that singing and dancing is haram and should not be undertaken by any decent Muslim.

    I said…”bbbut what about Ishan Bahar”

    They all said…He’s barbath not strictly Muslim.

    What a change to read Izeth Hussain on this renaissance.

    When did you convert, Thamby?

    • 1
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      Spring Koha,
      There is plenty of interesting (and sexy) Pakistani music on you-tube. You might think they have converted to Buddhism.

      • 1
        1

        You may be right Old Codger…

        I hear those Pakistani boys are very partial to the ‘lotus position’.

        Aman! Aman! Aman!

  • 2
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    Dear Old Codger,

    Please don’t introduce Spring Koha to any such gyrations…not at his age when he is just half a step away from his maker! Besides, if that lilting music proves too much of a Viagra who knows what the old chap would do with his tool, now obviously out of use , rusty and filled with alcohol for decades!

    • 0
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      N de S,
      I think we are all at that age where only a charge of “assault with a blunt instrument” will stick.

      • 1
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        Old Codger, Neville,

        ‘…..now obviously out of use , rusty and filled with alcohol for decades!….’

        Vehemently. NO!

        The secret of longevity is to keep all working parts in order. I do that thro’ clean living and regular maintenance. Well oiled tools always gave good service; in or out of the workshop.

        Never mind Esto Perpetua, my own motto is ‘venite, et simul’ which translates as ‘come and go at the same time’. What a wonderful aspiration.

  • 7
    1

    Therese, I did not intend to belittle you or insult you, my apologies.The moment any one degrades or insults a minority by calling them thambi I just naturally spring into action.I am a minority in the western world and know something I never knew when I was in Srilanka what minorities go through in SL. As for for Buddhists in SL there is no Nirvana or heaven for Christians.If you want to know my backgrond, I was born To a anglican family(thank goodness for that)and was FAscinated by Abraham. V Kovoor the rationalist of the day and subsequently of the Philosophy of Existentialism of J Paul Satre.

    • 2
      4

      Well, that history explains the idiocy that seems to be driving your stupid comments.

      Hope your faith wil help you get a brain in your next birth at least.

      • 3
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        Banasekera,

        If not being an Anglican makes you write comments like this, I wish the whole population were Anglicans.

    • 3
      0

      Hey….thanks jay gunasekara

  • 9
    2

    IH concludes his comments with an observation about “sexual repression which was probably behind much of the hatred directed against the gorgeously structured KJ”

    Oh, come on! Surely, this is drawing a very long bow. Is IH trying to act out his own fantasies here?. You don’t have to look for obscure Freudian explanations for what has happened. In the popular mind, Danno Budunge is regarded as a sacred song, sung in the manner in which it has traditionally been rendered. And that is not how KJ sang it. And a lot of people did not like it sung that way. It is as simple as that.

    That does not however justify the extreme and unfair criticism that KJ has had to endure.

    • 9
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      Know A”ll

      Succinctly stated. A glorified “much ado about nothing!”

      • 4
        8

        As always Jealous Deane, your reply is brilliant. As a fitting reward for being so brilliant, I suggest you re=read Leelananda – IH

        • 3
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          Izeth Hussain

          “As always Jealous Deane, your reply is brilliant. As a fitting reward for being so brilliant, I suggest you re=read Leelananda – IH”

          In case you are not aware, the Wahhabies and their clones have a comprehension, critical thinking and analytical problem. Given is support for the above assertion from the Saudi Wahhabis.

          Regression Plot: The regression plot for GMAT scores and L&V’s (2012) Estimated National IQs is shown below.
          [Edited out]

          • 6
            3

            Of course we are used to the delusive conclusions of Amarasiri. Every sentence written in reply to his, elicits a response attaching a Wahabi, which in turn is connected to a GMAT score, which necessitates a regression plot and establishing L&V’s (2012), which is connected to a flat earth, which has some connection to the quantum theory with a horde of YouTube references and the linkage goes on ad infinitum. Amarasiri, it is time you went for your routine check up.! Don’t forget to take hard copies of one of your replies but tell your physician how many times you have repeated the same nonsense in the last 24 hours.

            • 2
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              J.Deane

              It is very difficult to get ideas across to people who lack common sense and critical thinking and analytical skills. The reason for IQ tests, GMAT etc. is t sort them out. On a Global scale when these tests were done, the Saudi Wahhabi graduates came at the bottom, for their Native Intelligence Scale. This did not happen to Sunni Turks and Shia Iranians or Sunni <Moroccans or Sunni Indonesians, or Christians.

              Only Saudi Wahhabis and Qutari Wahhabis, the two countries funding and supporting the Iblis ISIS, scored lower. Is stupidity a virtue for the Wahhabies and theit clones?

              You have been misled by Ibn Taymiah and Abdul Wahhab..

              Read what one of the Great Theologians, and Confused Philosopher, Al-Ghazali had to say, about the above two stupids, like the Wahhabis, who came after him, but can infer from his writings, in Incoherence of the Philosophers.

              "The harm inflicted on religion by those who defend it in a way not proper to it is greater than the harm caused by those who attack it in the way proper to it. As it has been said, : " A rational foe is better than and ignorant friend"."

              We are talking about Wahhanies, Salafies and their clones, ISIS, damage done to Islam and Muslims. Al Ghazali was prescient here about the Wahhabies and their clones, centuries before theit appearance. Now combine that with the Hadith of Najd, and use common sense.

              Abū Ḥāmid Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad al-Ghazālī (/ɡæˈzɑːli/c. 1058 – 18 December 1111), shortened as Al-Ghazali and known as Algazelus or Algazel to the Western medieval world, was a Muslim theologian, jurist, philosopher, and mystic of Persian descent.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al-Ghazali

              Dimitri Gutas and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy consider the period between the 11th and 14th centuries to be the "Golden Age" of Arabic and Islamic philosophy, initiated by Ghazali's successful integration of logic into the Islamic seminary Madrasah curriculum.

              The Revival of Religious Sciences

              Another of al-Ghazali's major works is Ihya' Ulum al-Din or Ihya'u Ulumiddin (The Revival of Religious Sciences). It covers almost all fields of Islamic sciences: fiqh (Islamic jurisprudence), kalam (theology) and sufism. It contains four major sections: Acts of worship (Rub' al-'ibadat), Norms of Daily Life (Rub' al-'adatat), The ways to Perdition (Rub' al-muhlikat) and The Ways to Salvation (Rub' al-munjiyat).

              The Ihya became the most frequently recited Islamic text after the Qur'an and the hadith. Its great achievement was to bring orthodox Sunni theology and Sufi mysticism together in a useful, comprehensive guide to every aspect of Muslim life and death.The book was well received by Islamic scholars such as Nawawi who stated that: "Were the books of Islam all to be lost, excepting only the Ihya', it would suffice to replace them all." Ghazali then wrote a brief version of this book in Persian under The Alchemy of Happiness (Kimiya-yi sa'ādat).

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              J.Deane

              Do the Wahhabies and their clones, believe that Stupidity is a Virtue?

              Just Listen to what Noam Chomsky “On Western Terrorism” Interview.

              He is taking about Niggers, as per British Terminology, Third World People, who funded and initiated Abdul Wahhab to create trouble for the Ottoman Empire and the Wahhabi Saudis.

              Would you give up your Satan Iblis Wahhabism?

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPRvssOZiKA

              Published on Sep 18, 2013

              Noam Chomsky, professor of linguistics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the author of many books including, with Andre Vltchek, On Western Terrorism: From Hiroshima to Drone Warfare, talks about his new book, his body of work and his take on recent events, plus listener calls.

            • 1
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              J.Deane / Izeth Hussein

              Amarasiri still does not have a solution to bring the die Hard Wahhabis and their Clones back to the straight path and civilization.

              How can one make Muslims Think, instead of following the Ulema Blindly and getting low GMAT Scores?

              They, Wahhabis, seem not to understand. They keep following Iblis, Satan. Is Stupidity a virtue for them?

              Can the Following 5 Islamic Philosophers Every Muslim Must Read Help these Wahhabies who are misled by Satan,Iblis?

              5 Islamic Philosophers Every Muslim Must Read

              One of the Greatest is: Ibn Rushd (1126-1198 AD)

              Ibn Rushd, known in the West as Averroes, has probably had a bigger impact on Western religion and philosophy than on Islamic thought. Some Muslim historians have described the modern enlightened West as the imagination of Averroes. Ibn Rushd was a remarkable thinker. He was a judge, expert in Islamic law (Maliki), a physician and a philosopher.

              In his Fasl al-Maqal (The Decisive Treatise) he makes the case for philosophy and for the compatibility of science and religion, faith and reason. His Tahafat al-Tahafat (Incoherence of Incoherence) is a systematic rebuttal to Al-Ghazzali’s Tahat al-Falasifah (Incoherence of Philosophy) and a strong defense of Aristotelian philosophy. Together the two classics by Ibn Rushd and Al-Ghazzali are a highlight of Islamic philosophical heritage. Muslims must read these philosophers; some of their arguments are still germane.

              Islamic intellectual culture suffers from a philosophy deficit. While there are a few philosophical thinkers in the Muslim World today none of them enjoys the rock star status that many pedestrian preachers and YouTube stalwarts enjoy. What this tells us is that people are beginning to value knowledge but are unable to distinguish between preaching and thinking.

              What we need today are critical thinkers who force Muslims to think and not feel-good narratives that create comfort bubbles and inhibit thought. It is only through reading and engaging in philosophical discourses will the intellectual level of the Muslim community rise. Towards that end I want to recommend five Muslim philosophers that all Muslims must read. The purpose of this introduction is to generate enough curiosity so that people can start reading them.

              One does not need to be a student or teacher of philosophy to read the works of these great philosophers. The complexity and sophistication of their work is an indication of the quality of intellectual life that prevailed in what is often referred to as the golden age of Islam. All educated Muslims should familiarize themselves with their work just to be intellectually plugged into their own heritage. One does not have to read them in the original, great if you can. Reading at least secondary sources of their works can go a long way in helping one grasp the broad intellectual contours of Islamic civilization.

              http://www.huffingtonpost.com/muqtedar-khan/5-islamic-philosophers-every-muslim-must-read_b_6912014.html

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      [Edited out]

  • 3
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    Typo:
    Sorry should read ” much ado about nothing”

  • 2
    2

    Banasekara I wonder what sort of intelect or education you have,maybe the paper kind.please do not worry about my next life but do the poojas and take more sil and bana for yourself nincompoop.

  • 1
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    Just listen to this…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ds_CMOa3J8…I hear this kind of stuff from all around me in this nut house all the time…nothing asian about this mad squealing…nothing Buddhist or spiritual about it either…Mendelssohnian..???…I doubt it…sounds like some drunks after the arrack has been guzzled and the kassipu brought out…so this is what the fuss is about eh!!! this is the great sinhala buddhist cultural heritage eh?…great! Have fun. There is a version here too…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ds_CMOa3J8&list=RD_Ds_CMOa3J8#t=0

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