29 September, 2020

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Celebrating 71 Years Of What?

By Vinod Moonesinghe

Vinod Moonesinghe

For once, I find myself agreeing with Sharmini Serasinghe. She entitles her open letter to minister Mangala Samaraweera (Colombo Telegraph, 27 January) “4th February 2019 – Celebrating 71 Years Of What?”, and I should tend to agree that there is nothing to celebrate.

In the first place, “Independence Day” is a misnomer. What Sri Lanka achieved on 4 February 1948 was not independence, but a slightly modified form of imperialist rule. Even in purely legal terms, Sri Lanka became a Dominion Realm, which meant we were subordinate to England. The King of England continued to be the King of Ceylon, and his daughter continued as Queen afterwards. Technically, they should have been King George IV and Queen Elizabeth I – because Lanka never had a George I and II or an Elizabeth I – but they kept their English numbers, because the de facto position was that they were our monarchs by virtue of being monarchs of England.

Sri Lanka’s final court of appeal remained the English monarch’s Privy Council, able to overturn the decisions of the Supreme Court. The most celebrated instance of this occurred after the only real coup d’etat to be attempted in this island, that of 1961, when Privy Council overturned the convictions of the participants. 

Sri Lanka also remained bound to Britain by various treaties and other, not overtly visible ties. Of course the most obvious, the British military bases on the island, ensured that it could be kept in line. Apart from the naval base (HMS Highflyer) at Trincomalee and RAF Negombo at Katunayake, British forces were scattered over Sri Lanka in various warlike installations. Perhaps the English used their power most blatantly when they continued to occupy their signals intelligence station on the Anderson Golf Links, but failed to inform the Government of Ceylon as to its real purpose.

The people of Sri Lanka saw the practical effects of the continued British military occupation, when the entire cabinet of Sri Lanka sought refuge from the masses during the 1953 Hartal – on the British destroyer HMS Newfoundland. This situation only changed in 1957, when the government of SWRD Bandaranaike forced the British to remove their bases – a process completed only in 1962, with the evacuation of Kotugoda, Welisara and Perkar.

Even more than the military occupation of Sri Lanka, the economic subjugation of the country continued long after 1948. Unlike the Portuguese and Dutch, the English did not come to Sri Lanka for cinnamon (the value of which had diminished) but due to the strategic position of the country vis-à-vis India. In order to pay for the colony’s upkeep, they decided to grow coffee here, and expropriated the common and forest land of the peasantry for the purpose. The very same government officials, from the Governor, military commander and Chief Justice down, responsible for expropriating the peasants’ land, sold it to themselves at 5 shillings per acre. Thus, from the very first, government interests intertwined themselves with planter interests, and the inseparability of the two came to be known as the “Plantation Raj”. 

The degree to which the colonial state subordinated itself to the interests of the British estate companies may be seen in the development of Colombo port. In the mid-19th century, Galle was the biggest port in the island, and the most important between Aden and Singapore. It lay close to the sea route and was a hub for shipping from Europe to India’s eastern seaboard, the Far East and Australia. Even the Admiralty wanted to develop Galle, due to its proximity to the sea route. However, the Colombo was far closer to the coffee plantations, so the government developed Colombo rather than Galle, although it cost more than twice as much.

The plantation system introduced to this country had little to do with modern capitalism, being a slightly more advanced version of the slave plantations of the West Indies, which were consciously copied by the planters. The indentured labourers brought over from India were debt peons, forever enslaved; whereas the plantations had very little capital input. At the same time, peasant agriculture became more backward under colonial rule, since the source of the farmers’ surplus for the market, the common and forest (hence chena) land, had been expropriated. Colonialism deepened the backwardness of the agricultural economy. This backwardness also persisted beyond 1948.

A covert form of colonial economic control persisted well past 1948. All government overseas purchases continued to be handled by the Crown Agents for the Colonies, a statutory corporation under the Colonial Office (later under the Ministry of International Development).

During the sale of expropriated land, locals, mainly from the strata from which the colonial state recruited its Native headmen, as well as traders and arrack rentiers, purchased about a third of crown grants – although in much smaller parcels than their British counterparts. Their interests thus intertwined themselves with the interests of the British planters, and the comprador elite’s identification with colonialism became entrenched. The servile nature of the elite was perhaps the strongest form of dependence which persisted past 1948.

The commitment of the elite to colonial economic forms has dragged back the economy. Even when the colonial governments, due to the exigencies of war, tried to promote a degree of industrialisation in the 1940s, the elite refused to dirty its collective hand. Indeed, following 1948, the post-colonial, colonialist regime dismantled the industries which the British had started; a pattern followed by the comprador elite ever since.

Yet another form of colonisation was through the Roman principle of divide et impera, or divide and rule, a strategy honed by the British empire from the Plantation of Ireland onwards. They undermined the steadfast loyalty of the people of Jaffna to the Kandyan Kingdom (mentioned by North in a minute to the English East India Company in 1800), by the use of (mainly American) missionaries to educate the Northern Tamil elite and grant them a privileged position, second only to that of the Dutch Burghers. They enhanced the economic and political status of a stratum of Muslim landowner/moneylenders (Hambaya meant “trader”) – which they supplemented using South Indian Chetties, who also handled the Opium trade – and held the impoverished peasantry in debt. They tried very hard to attract Chinese, Bharathas and other Indians to become small-scale land owners, but failed. They nearly substituted Chinese for Indian Tamils in the plantations.

The status of Ceylon as a politically dependent Commonwealth Realm remained unchanged until 1972, when Sri Lanka became a republic. The economic independence of Sri Lanka remains to be achieved and, although the 1956-77 period saw progress, but the following period saw the gains reversed. The country’s economy remains mercantile rather than industrial, agriculture remains backward. The legacy of the British-induced ethnic divisions remains. Estate nationalisation and the land reform saw the destruction of the Plantation Raj, but the post-1977 reaction introduced the Trading Raj in its stead. The subaltern, landowner and trade-based comprador class remains a rentier class, although no longer land-owning – the share and money markets have replaced agricultural land as their source of wealth.

As an aside, Serasinghe says “the British fled our shores for their dear lives,” implying that they were very happy to leave. Mainstream Sri Lankan “history” does suggest that the English left voluntarily. They did not. On the contrary, they only “left” because they had to. 

I believe it was Sir Oliver Ernest Goonetilleke who pointed out to them that if they did not confer Dominion status, there would be a revolution – and the spectre of the Left haunted them in a way unthinkable today. They had to leave because their position had been made untenable by events in India – such as the mutinies in the Sepoy Army – caused by agitation in which Sri Lankan leftists such as Philip Gunawardena and NM Perera had taken part. A wave of strikes and other protests greeted their return to the island. I have heard that on Wewessa estate the workers formed a “soviet”, although I cannot confirm this.

And, as detailed above, they never really “left”. Sri Lanka’s journey of the last 71 years has been a struggle to remove the effects of colonialism from our polity. The barrier to removing that colonial inheritance, the yoke of under-development, has been the very stratum of comprador rentiers to which Serasinghe belongs. Far from being “voiceless and faceless”, as Serasinghe contends, they hold the economic and social power of this country, and hold a substantial part of the political power. 

The true “voiceless and faceless” are the farmers and workers, who owe nothing to Serasinghe’s class for their wellbeing. And they will almost all agree that their situation is far better than it was before 1948. So perhaps we really do have reason to celebrate: the reduction in infant and maternal mortality; the increase in literacy (especially among the estate population); and access to potable water and electricity; roads, schools, hospitals.

And is it not ironic that Serasinghe calls President Sirisena a “traitor”, when she herself regrets the departure of the British colonialists, who left a ruined country in their wake?

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Latest comments

  • 17
    3

    The only 2 things Sri Lankans are good at – blaming others for their problems and selling each other out for a few Rupees!

    It’s absurd to blame the British for the current situation in the country – that’s 100% Sri Lankan.

    No mention of your wonderful Politicians who have turned the country into a Corrupt, Lawless, Bankrupt Failed State.

    These same Politicians have enriched themselves, their families and their cronies in the process.

    A culture of Impunity and Zero Accountability.

    What Sri Lankans need to do is take a long look in the mirror and see the real cause of their problems.

    • 12
      3

      UKCitizen

      Don’t you appreciate the fact that the proud sons of this island have turned the village women/girls into sought after slaves in Medieval Middle East Kingdoms?

      Don’t you appreciate the fact that how the majoritarian have turned this island into a Technologically advanced, Scientifically unmatched, ……………. independent sovereign state, ………….. envied by all countries, proud of having toilets, every politician proud of winning a war single handedly, every army man proud of winning the war single handedly, …
      Aren’t you aware of the fact that this island got rid of everything that is considered colonial, language, education, labour, culture, liberation of land, …………..

    • 1
      3

      Does the mirror at Halgolla still have enough mercury on the back? May be it needs a repaint job to show you how futile your venture of flooding CT with this pro imperialist bullshit really is.

      No way, Poo Tay!

  • 6
    3

    Bro, colonialism is long over but people like you are living on it. The truth of the matter is with or without the colonialism the Lankan situation would have been the same or even worse, because of people like you. So enough of giving excuses for the failure of our own politicians and people. You just have to look at the world map to realize how many countries which were under colonial rule (which were far more affected) have gone to flourish beyond expectations. Lanka is ranked in 89 th position in corruption list. Is it because of colonialism??????? This logic of yours, to me is like “you now being diagnosed with Diabetes blaming your great great grand father for drinking out of control”. Bro get over the DENIAL , only then the true recovery begins ( until then it is more of doctor visits and medicines) . Sharmini has been able to come out of it.

  • 5
    1

    Dude just read the article written by Vidhya Abahayagunawardena on the same topic, who seems much younger to you in the profile picture. Then read again my comment. I am curious which part of the world you are living right now????/

  • 1
    1

    Dude just read the article written by Vidhya Abahayagunawardena on the same topic, who seems much younger to you in the profile picture. Then read again my comment. I am curious which part of the world you are living right now???? Hope the answer is not UK ,Netherland or the Iberia region.

  • 2
    1

    Readers this is off the track but I just want to clarify my doubts.Before and during the 50 days coupe we saw articles penned by DJ daily, on some occasion more than one a day. But after their plans (we know DJ knew in advance because of his letter to Pissu Vasu) fizzled out DJ just went into hibernation. No more Neoliberal socialism/ communism crap from him. Is this my imagination or real. Most probably we may see him after the next regime change MS is talking about. This writer reminded me of DJ and hence the question. If this is all takes for one to be known as political scientist , then I may consider as an option after retirement.

    • 1
      3

      Sayanim Shit, Before prescribing treatment for others’ diabetes, get freedom from your mental allegiance to Zionist mafia and trying to change the world so that the fourth temple could be built.

      Tell those devil worshipers that god does not live in temples and god should enter hearts for people to go to heaven.

      You certainly have no place there!

  • 6
    4

    Vinod, I think you and that mad hatter from thimbirigasyaya suffer from a colonial hang-over. Here is a little comment from a CT reader to one of his: ” Due to the pathological upbringing some receive in post-colonial societies, they develop schizoid personalities with severe identity crisis”. This suits you too as we have noted how much you like to dress up like an “Englishman”. Your life apes everything that is the West. For you guys, it is only fashionable to talk about “voiceless and faceless” workers and farmers and of course the now dysfunctional and creepy leftist parties: Vasu, Dinesh et al. How many kms of railway lines have we built after the British left? And I know you hailed the traitorous October Coup as a victory and the Supreme Court decision as a Black Day for you.

    • 1
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      Alas, like all those other Colombots, you seem to allow your hatred for any opposition to colonialism to cloud your thinking. Anti-colonialists see nothing inherently wrong with the English, or their mode of dress. We do not “ape” the West, but we draw from all cultures. We do not forget that the revival of nationalism was aided by a Hawai’ian, the part that an Anglo-Australian played in our independence struggle, or the help given to Sri Lanka during the US oil embargo by the independent oil producers of Kansas.
      We do know how the “voiceless and faceless” masses live, unlike the Colombot elite.
      Why do you ask how many kilometres of railway line were built after the British left, and not how many steel mills or tyre factories were built BEFORE they did?
      If we suffer from a colonial hang-over, it is because the country suffers from the after-effects of the 450-year occupation and ravaging of this country by colonial powers. Why don’t you deal with the points we raise, without descending into personal abuse? Is it because you are unable to?

      • 0
        0

        Vinod, the article by Vidya Abhayagunawardena is definitely one of better quality and substance than yours and you must be humble enough to learn from it. My question about the railways is also an important one. I don’t think the british were here to build factories for us. They obviously had their own agenda. And that’s old hat. I stand by my comments. But if you really feel that I have abused you – then I am sorry for hurting your feelings. I did not mean to. But you got to get all of this anti-colonial stuff behind you and move on. That’s what most people on this forum are telling you. Thanks for taking the time to respond.

  • 12
    1

    When were the Jaffna Tamils loyal to the Kandyan kingdom? A kingdom they were never part of. The north and most of Trincomallee district and the north west coast were part of the Jaffna kingdom and other parts of the east only from time to time came under the loose control of the Kandyan kingdom. Most of these kings of Kandy were of Tamil orign. Stop misrperesenting history. Blame every one else for the country now being a failure , the British , the Jaffna Tamils, The Muslims, the Burghers, The poor Indian origin estate Tamils but not the Sinhalese , whom you are trying to paint as victims but are the real cause for the county being failure , because of their mean racist fascist nature and their religious intolerance , all based on a comic book named Mahavamsa . You are prime example of this.

    • 3
      5

      Why don’t you go to the Sri Lanka National Archives and look up the colonial despatches, instead of displaying your ignorance?

      • 4
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        I know my history far better than you and need not look up at any archive racist. Oh by the way from your surname, I know you belong to one of theese recently Sinhalised South Indian imports , who were brought into the island by the Portuguese and Dutch to do menial work and have now taken up a Sinhalese identity and beat the anti Tamil drum. Please go and check the National Archives for this and you will get the information but then again you already know this.

        • 0
          0

          If you knew your history so well, you would have known that Governor North was my source.
          If I am one of those “recently Sinhalised South Indian imports…”, how does that affect my argument? Will you deny that Governor North wrote about the loyalty of the people of the North to the Kandyan Kingdom?

  • 3
    5

    Great write up.

    Serasinghe belongs to the strata which Vinod describes as “the strata from which the colonial state recruited its Native headmen” and “The servile nature of the elite was perhaps the strongest form of dependence which persisted past 1948.”

    I saw in social media this Chamini Serasinghe made a fool of herself talking about her castes, class, her father and ill effects of free education and scholarships which rid her strata (actually reduced) of political power. She is a remnant of colonial slaves. She calls her self proudly a Radala but she seems not to know the real radalas were actually destroyed by the British and those who got economic prosperity by offering their support to the British now call themselves Radala. CBK belongs to that and so does she.

  • 1
    7

    Sri Lanka’s issue is nothing but inability to manage the ill effects of colonial period. MR did manage successfully to an extent which is why the so called strata which depended on British hate MR. This explains the hate, Serasinghe has towards Rajapaksas. It is not about minority issues or problems of rule of law. The real issue is in modern SL, Rajapaksas dismantled the remaining colonial power structures.

    • 4
      0

      sachoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      “MR did manage successfully to an extent which is why the so called strata which depended on British hate MR. “.

      What were the ill effects of Colonial period?
      How exactly did MR manage it?
      What were the remaining ill effects of Colonial period after Dr Mahinda’s miracle touch , may be his Midas touch?

      • 1
        2

        The biggest ill effect is Tamil terrorism. The British created a Tamil polity in North.
        The educated youth of this country become servants of western imperialism. Sri Lanka never had an awakening like rest of the subcontinent. Sri Lankan politics is similar to African system where there are two extreme policies of servitude to the west and impractical nationalism

  • 6
    1

    Vinod Moonesinghe is broadly agreeing with Sharmini Serasinghe’s open letter to Minister Mangala Samaraweera in CT of 27 January titled “4th February 2019 – Celebrating 71 Years Of What?”.
    His disagreement is on details.
    For example, Vinod suggests that “Independence Day” is a misnomer. Something special did happen on 04 February 1948. The 14 April 2019 is another day but we celebrate it ‘Sinhala and Tamil New Year’.
    .
    The use-by date of blaming colonialism is well past. We must take responsibility for the prevailing culture of corruption/nepotism/impunity. We are powerless to bridle this and can only hope that the powerful ruling elites will reform.
    .
    We have not yet fallen over the Failed-State-Cliff. We can only hope that the ruling elites will not push us. Hope is our only hope.

    • 1
      0

      When I disagree with Serasinghe, I disagree on far more than just the details. I disagree as to how far we are independent. I am sorry if that was not clear from my article.
      I am not just blaming colonialism. I am blaming the comprador-rentier elite left over from the Colonial period. They have withstood every effort to modernise the country, and turned the clock back on many of the reforms carried out in the 1956-77 period. The stymied our efforts to industrialise. The current economic crisis the country faces is due to thier efforts at making a fast buck. Our agricultural sector remains backward, and our manufacturing sector is fundamentally just stitching together stuff imported from abroad.
      If you look at the case of South Korea or Taiwan, you will see that corruption/nepotism/impunity were no bar to modernisation and rapid industrialisation. But then, THEY carried out land reform and freed the peasant sector, and their states directed the industrialisation process.

  • 1
    10

    Vinod,

    Blame it all on the freaking Minorities. We have 3 minorities that are a curse on any nation.

    Look at education. Tamils and Muslims do not believe in going to school. While I do understand the former’s poverty levels is the primary cause of it, the latter only beleives in two things only. Allah hoo akbar and deception. So, education is not of paramount importance to them. The burghers, give them a bottle of arrack and they will not even take their child to school.

    Look at the current Cricket team. There isn’t a single Tamil, Muslim or a Burgher. Long time ago that Tea Plucker Muralitharan played but that was so long ago.
    There contribution is 0. But their bravado is infinite.

    Look at the Army. Who did the hardwork to get rid of the Terrorists? The Sinhalese. But who attempts to discredit them and devalue their hardwork?

    In contrary, other countries are blessed to have minorities that contribute so much. Take the Hispanics of America for example. They will work for less money, they will be subordinate, they will work fast. You ask an Amigo to shovel your driveway and you use the word “Rapido” and you can be rest assured that it will get done in no time.

    Look at the Indian Tamils and Indian Muslims of South Africa known as coolies. They will work in the fields all day. They will step onto the drainage when the White man passes by, they contribute so much to the Diamond industry and yet they don’t whine like our ones.

    Australia’s aborigines, New Zealand’s Maoris. Lovely people.

    • 6
      1

      @Retarded Shemale bugger, Tamils and Muslims don’t believe in going to school? Hahahahaha…………is that why you ended up in the Army? Because you had so much education, only the Army was able to hire you loser?

  • 3
    1

    Dear Vinod
    Thank you so much for bringing back some context to all thing fake nowdays……respect.
    Colonialism was replaced by regional ‘foreign state sponsored terrorism’……this breeding program will just pray on/absorb all with insatiable appetite/need to survive………that is all what has really happened in SL.
    The local misfits up North and South got elected in 1977 general election a ‘black July’ indeed for the Nation and taken her down this black hole……..the end of Nationhood facilitated by the gun trotting youths down South followed by up North which started in 1970……….the consequence of a youth misadventure/our children who can kill their own under the pretext of whatever? no Nation can survive this scenario???
    The Foreign Involvement will always be there and is for us to ensure it is there for the right reasons.
    We should have stopped identity politics/political parties in our Nation since 2009?????and then only we should revisit democracy after we put an end to this for good…….failure cause now we are reaping the benefit with ‘constitutional assembly’ and ‘constitutional coups’?????? a chicken and egg situation once more??
    We can not have Tamil Sinhala Muslim Christian Hindu Buddhists parties in our Nation will never allow us to celebrate a day that should bring us together……..we can always remember our journey for the right reasons……a day to remember all our children whom we failed through our own ignorance……..make this an environmental day…..invite all the Nations children and the UN to clean up the country of all the trash/waste with their community…………..make this a meaningful day of ownership of the environment will free us all from all ills/past.
    A real independence awaits us……….not through remembering our kings/
    https://www.ted.com/talks/tshering_tobgay_this_country_isn_t_just_carbon_neutral_it_s_carbon_negative?language=en

  • 1
    1

    Singapore, China, Malaysia and others have all followed the modern (western) modal and not feudal peasant plantations/farms. Under the feudal system the Sinhalese were the labouring class and the Muslims and some Tamils were the trading class. In any case the locals should not have betrayed their king and then elect descendants of those traitors to power. Do not be surprised by the destruction they created, they were elected on feudal tribal theory.

    The Sri Lankan owned plantations were nationalised 3 years before the European owned ones…!! The tea industry was ruined and run-downed by those who had not invested in them. It was the selective application of LSSP policy (with ulterior motives) by SLFP and the emerging elite against the established elite that laid the modern foundation of the (Sinhala) economic ruin. Dynastic and tribal politics meant that even the UNP did not return these cash-cows to their rightful owners (whose families had laid the foundations of the Sri Lankan political struggle). It was Leslie Goonawardena that played a significant part in the Quit India Movement, both NM and Phillip were deported with-in months of their entry to India.

    Actually, the farmers today are not better off than 1948, very few of their young desire to get back in the field/mud. Like most humans they also desire the modern/western facilities and dreams. There was no literacy for peasants in our feudal Indian colonial system, that came about after the European/British colonial system. As for infant-maternal care, it was the brainchild of a progressive native, whose Agricultural Association abolished the feudal grain tax. In our feudal society also, there were the voiceless, faceless as well as the topless.

  • 4
    0

    Shameless Perera,
    Seems a cure for your mental illness has been long overdue. Even though cannabis is legal in Canada for medicinal use, that seems to have no effect in treating you. Your prefix suits you. Rtd. = Retarded, Lt.= Lunatic. Didn’t my comrades give you an open invitation to one of our offices or politburo’s close to you because we definitely have the guaranteed treatment for your illness although on foreign soil. The issue with this post-treatment is that the “Lt.” becomes that of the “Late” as in the case of the dearly departed. Do you want me to arrange that treatment for you?

  • 3
    2

    Now that we don’t see Dr. Dayan Jayathilake around here anymore, and while he enjoys the snowy pastures I must bring up Gramsci myself. The cultural hegemony that colonials used to keep the peasantry in line was transferred and carried on by the servile locals aka ancestors of SS, and until the local population is able to shake off the sticky mess of that hegemony, they cannot take wings and sore to the heights. Most of the Sri Lankan populace are still burdened by insecurity and lack of confidence, that is what needs to be addressed first and foremost.

  • 3
    2

    The land reform bills that are being brought for land banks and releasing deeds of hitherto crown lands will build another plantation raj, whether it is DOW, Bayer or Dudely Sirisenan is immaterial, Vinod, dude these land act amendments need to be stopped.

  • 2
    1

    Celebrating 71 Years Of What?

    Yellow robe!

  • 1
    1

    Celebrating 71 years of leading the shit hole list. Sayanim???? Vinod (what you guys are smoking now a days, Is that a colonial /zionist left over shit or your own home made). As per suggestion I went to national archives to find most of the artifacts including a sword is missing( stolen by Lankans, What ever displayed are fake and disinformation propaganda. Is that true buddy????)

  • 2
    0

    With what ever little common sense if there is any left, We the Srilankans must hoist Black Flags in mourning the handing over of sovereignty to a bunch of congenital looters, liars, plunderers, thieves, cheats etc., etc., for destroying this affluent country, then it was as, the world affectionately referred to it as The Pearl of the East to become the Tear Drop of India as is referred now.

  • 1
    2

    Vinod Moonesinghe,

    How to get rid of the Comprado Elite is the question. We know what Pol Pot and Hitler did. But we Lankans are more humane of course ( although it worked on reverse with the poor people of the country by the very same elite during the insurgencies…..only this time it was accredited because it was Western/Colonial).

    It requires a certain technique, sans selling ourselves to India and other places. JVP has the right idea. Unfortunately they are with Ranil to sell to India. In other words, their communist aspirations needs to latch on to a wider circle to be implementable ; the Elite Priviledge safeguarded.
    As the Lankan elite won’t let up, it’s the S. Indian masses we will have to hold hands with.

    Minus JVP, is there another party that will tax the elite, and only the elite, and not sell Sri Lanka to India? ( although a bit of India, China, and USA is fine)

    Taxing the elite is a good thing because we are not a major industrialized place that requires the elite to prop up our global dollar. It might have some consequences, but it will calm down far sooner than other major places. The time is right. Grab it!

    • 1
      0

      ramona grandma therese fernando

      “How to get rid of the Comprado Elite is the question. We know what Pol Pot and Hitler did. But we Lankans are more humane of course “

      I take it that Lankans didn’t kill their fellow Lankans, torture them, rape them, maim them, ………………….

      • 0
        1

        Ah my old friend NV,….read again: ……although it worked on reverse with the poor people of the country by the very same elite during the insurgencies (the Pol-Potting)…..only this time it was accredited because it was Western/Colonial.

        • 1
          0

          RTF, Do you change your nightie while you are assuming all different persona as NV, CHIV and many others, or do you gain inspiration by sniffing NV’s cracker nuts?

          Curious to know.

          • 1
            1

            Puswatte Arachchi,

            Let me appease your curiosity: No, I am not like you.
            _
            Typical obscenity by one who doesn’t have the intellect to contribute anything meaningful towards his/her very own motherland.

            • 2
              0

              ramona grandma therese fernando

              “Typical obscenity by one who doesn’t have the intellect to contribute anything meaningful towards his/her very own motherland.”

              Thanks for your Self-criticism.

  • 1
    0

    What freedom? Over 5% of our population are living overseas. Judging by the queues at embassies for visas if western countries open their doors 90% of the patriots will runaway only original settlers Veddas will remain.Those who leave Srilanka mostly will become third class citizen in the west do menial jobs like pumping petrol cleaning roads hospitals washroom and security etc subjugating all freedoms enjoyed in Srilanka and display bogus patriotism when they make request at the time of dying that their bodies be disposed in the motherland treating our country of birth as a cemetery.

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