18 April, 2024

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Good Governance & Economic Development

By W.A. Wijewardena

Dr. W.A Wijewardena

Good Governance Imposed on Sri Lanka by IMF

One of the preconditions of IMF’s Extended Fund Facility to Sri Lanka has been the completion of a diagnostic study of governance mechanism, including the anti-corruption law enforcement, by a team fielded by the Fund and Sri Lanka government should take remedial measures to correct the situation if there are deficiencies in the governance structure. This is a policy action which Sri Lanka should have taken on its own rather than being imposed by an outside lender. The IMF’s diagnostic report is to be out by September 2023. As a preliminary to this, Sri Lanka should enact a new anti-corruption law incorporating the global best practices by June 2023. The government has drafted a law on an anti-corruption mechanism, but it has been declared by the Supreme Court as inconsistent with the Constitution. Hence, the law is to be amended in line with the recommendations of the Supreme Court. It is not clear whether the amended law will be acceptable to the Fund. However, what is important is that IMF considers the presence of a strong governance structure in Sri Lanka for it to provide continued assistance to the country. As I have presented in a previous article in this series, IMF is worried about the governance structure in the borrowing country after it has burned its fingers by lending to Russia where moneys so lent had been siphoned off by the governmental authorities due to weaknesses in the governance structure and the existence of a non-independent central bank. 

Good Governance is a must for Sustained Economic Development

The presence of good governance at both the public and private sectors in a country has been viewed as a positive contributor to sustained economic growth. At the private sector level, practising good governance principles will enable the stakeholders of a private venture to get the best out of their deals with such ventures. If a private venture does not practice good governance principles, it amounts to an unequal exchange and the stakeholders are destined to a substandard choice in their transactions with it. The economy-wide presence of such substandard choices will reduce the welfare of a nation, though it may have attained high economic growth for several years.

Without Good Governance, Governments Can Waste Scarce Resources 

As compared to private ventures, government organisations are in an advantageous position since they could use the sovereign power of the state to extract resources from society at will. Since economic development entails the use of scarce resources of a society to get the maximum out of the least, governmental organisations should practice good governance by observing both the spirit and the letter of the principles of good governance. It gives confidence to investors that the moneys they invest are safe from improper expropriation which is a necessary condition for a society to ensure sustained economic growth. Empirical studies have shown that countries which have established good governance regimes have been able to attain a faster economic growth and sustain it in the long run. Countries with poor governance have not only been laggards in the race but also failures to sustain high economic growth continuously. 

This paper will concentrate on good governance in governmental organisations and how it would contribute to development. The responsibility for introducing and practicing good governance principles in the government sector of a country exclusively devolves on its political leaders.

Governance Means How Political Leaders Relate Themselves to Citizens

Governance means how an individual, an organisation or a government would relate itself to its stakeholders in a responsible manner in delivering its promises to them. In politics, it relates to the way elected politicians would perform their duties toward citizens who have elected them to power. In ancient times, kings and rulers of countries are said to have performed these duties by observing Ten Royal Qualities consisting of the qualities of gifting, sacrifice, virtue, austerity, uprightness, softness, non-harmfulness, having non-ill will, forbearance, and non-conflict. These ancient ten principles are so comprehensive that if any political leader follows them today, then, there is no need for enforcing governance on them externally. But, as remarked by James Madison, the fourth President of USA, ‘if men were angels, no government would be necessary’ [2]. This quote could be extended to governance as well: ‘since political leaders are not angels, enforcement of governance from outside is necessary’.

Government: Avoid Harm and Extend Benefits

Actions taken by a government do not necessarily benefit all. Some in society are made better off by government action, while some others are made worse off. Hence, the practice of governance by political leaders is necessary to avoid harms and enhance the benefits to citizens. For instance, in the case of a government, trying to attain the highest growth, while damaging the environment by a nation is not considered a good governance practice. Similarly, in the case of a company, it is not good governance if it seeks to maximise profits, while displeasing employees or cheating customers.

Governance Is All Over There

Governance is, therefore, a matter that is concerned with every area of human relationships, though in most cases, reference is made only to political governance or corporate governance. Within the system of political governance, there are sub-governance aspects concerning economic policy governance, monetary policy governance and so on. The proper observation of all these aspects of governance is necessary for a political cum economic system to function properly. This paper will look at these aspects in detail and argue that it is the responsibility of the political leadership to establish proper governance systems within a society.

Matters That Lead to Governance Issues

Issues relating to governance arise due to two connected reasons. The first is the division of labour which we have seen in modern economies. Accordingly, to do things better, people must depend on many others whom they engage as servants. For instance, since everyone is not competent to teach his or her own children, he or she must depend on a profession called teaching. Similarly, since each one of them cannot treat his or her own illnesses, once again he or she must depend on another profession called healthcare provision. Economists have branded those servants as agents and those who hire them as principals. That is at an individual level. At a company level, owners of a company hire managers to do the job and at the national level, citizens hand over the task of governing to elected politicians.

Man Is a Selfish Creature 

The second reason relates to the normal human nature. Man is by nature a selfish creature and, therefore, bent on satisfying his own self-interest over anything else. According to the evolutionary biologist, Richard Dawkins, who wrote the book, The Selfish Gene, the selfish nature is embodied in the very genetic constitution of species[3]. This was noted by Adam Smith in relation to economic relationships more than two centuries ago when he argued that one should expect his dinner not from the benevolence of brewers, bakers, or butchers, but from their regard to their own interest.

Agents Do Not Fulfil Principals’ Wishes

Thus, according to economists, the selfish servant or agent does not always act in the best of interest of the master or the principal for whom he works. Since the master has only two eyes and not ‘four eyes’, he cannot effectively control or see what the servant does. This has given rise to what is now known as the ‘Principal-Agent Problem’ in economics and it is this problem that has contributed to the governance issues in the society.

PAP is simply the existence of conflicting objectives between the principal and the agent whom he hires. The principal wants to gain the best for himself and that is why he pays the agent to do the job. But the agent, acting in his own interest may do things which are injurious to the principal. Thus, professionals whom an individual hires or the managers whom the shareholders engage or the politicians whom the citizens elect will not satisfy the needs of their respective principals but try to satisfy their own desires which are different from those of the principals. 

PAP had been known quite for some time and even measures to alleviate its harmful effects have been suggested. Kautilya, the Indian Economist in the 4th century BCE, wrote in his economic text, The Arthashastra, that just like a person with honey or poison on the tip of his tongue cannot resist tasting some of it, public servants too cannot resist misappropriating the funds entrusted to them. Worse, the king cannot see it just like he cannot say whether a fish in the water is drinking water or not. Kautilya prescribed both the carrot and the stick to minimise its occurrence. 

Politicians Maximize Their Wellbeing

In the modern era, William A Niskanen, formerly an official of the US Budget Management Office and later an economist attached to the University of California, Los Angeles, in a path breaking publication titled ‘Bureaucracy and Representative Government’[7] in 1971, talked about PAP between the community represented by the government and its civil servants represented by public bureaus. Drawing on the previous studies on the subject by economists like Ludwig von Mises and Gordon Tullock, Niskanen presented a new theory called ‘Economic Theory of Bureaucracy’ in which the community as the principal tries to maximise welfare of the members through public expenditure programmes and the civil servants as agents try to maximise their salaries and perks. Accordingly, government expenditure programmes tend to be overestimated and the community has to bear bigger and bigger burdens as taxpayers if tax rates are raised or as victims of inflation if new money is printed to fund such programmes. 

PAP is most prevalent in joint stock companies where owners and managers are two separate groups. The owners do operate with the support of the board of directors which has the responsibility for deciding on policy and exercising general oversight on the management. Managers, on the other hand, manage the company to attain its goals. If the Board is passive and cannot exercise its controlling functions effectively, it gives ample opportunities for managers to do everything in their way: rob from the principals, drive them to unwarranted risks, involve them in costly legal battles and make them lose reputation through displeasure of employees and customers. At the end of the day, managers can leave the place having soiled it, but the shareholders and board members who represent them must break their necks to clean it. 

Thus, the effective resolution of PAP is the solution to the governance issues in any place. 

Good Governance in Politics Improves Wellbeing of Citizens

The presence of good governance in politics as well as in economic policy making contributes to quality of life of people and sustainable economic growth. In a paper presented to the 5th Economic Panel Meeting at Harvard University in April 2002, under the title ‘Growth without Governance’[8] World Bank economists Daniel Kaufmann and Aart Kraay have argued that the quality of governance has a very strong positive impact on the per capita income across the countries. Using a set of Worldwide Governance Indicators or WGIs, a good governance template prepared by them for the World Bank, in 175 countries for the period 2001/2, the two economists have also found two other important relationships. The first is relating to the theme of their paper that good governance contributes immensely to a sustainable high growth in PCI in countries. The second is that the growth in PCI does not contribute to improve the quality of governance in the same tempo. Their finding was that growth in PCI has either a weak or a negative impact on the improvement of the quality of governance if good governance had been absent in society initially. In other words, good governance certainly leads to economic growth, but economic growth does not necessarily bring in quality governance in society.

In a Working Paper released by the Department of Economics and Finance of the Middle Tennessee State University in USA in December 2010, Bichaka Fayissa and Christian Nsiah[9] have found that in African countries the gaps in economic growth between the richer and the poorer countries have been mainly due to the differences in the quality of governance in the respective countries. For their empirical study covering 28 African countries, the two economists have used the same WGIs relating to the relevant countries between 1995 and 2005.

Good Governance Is a Prerequisite 

Thus, the consensus among economists is that good governance is a pre-requisite for sustaining economic growth and improving the quality of life of people. However, there are a few economists like Columbia University’s Jeffrey Sachs who believe that emphasis on good governance for sustaining economic growth has been a misguided policy drive. In an article written to the magazine Foreign Affairs in October[10], 2012 Sachs has countered the argument by Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson in their book ‘Why Nations Fail’ [11] that superior political institutions protect property rights and through such protections, incentivise the process of invention and the diffusion – distribution of such knowledge among prospective entrepreneurs – helping the countries to sustain economic growth. Sachs has argued that what is more important is diffusion and therefore, without getting involved in inventions, if a country can cause diffusion to happen, that country can ensure continued economic growth as has been shown by many authoritarian countries in East Asia. His reference was to countries like South Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore. Yet, in all these countries, people dissatisfied with the quality of life delivered by the authoritarian governments have agitated for democratic institutions which the authorities have delivered to them eventually. Thus, these countries were able to sustain economic growth. However, the other authoritarian countries were not so fortunate and had to go through bloody revolutions which have taken them back for many centuries.

[1] Available at: http://www.beyondthenet.net/misc/ten_royal_qualities.htm 

[2] Available at: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/jamesmadis105473.html (accessed on 10.1.2019)

[3] Dawkins, Richard, (2009), The Selfish Gene, Oxford University Press, Oxford.

[4] Smith, Adam, (2003) The Wealth of Nations, Bantam Classic, New York, p 23

[5] For details, see, https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/other/principal-agent-problem/ (accessed on 10.1.2019)

[6] Kautilya, (1992) The Arthashastra, (Translator: L N Rangarajan) Penguin Classics, p 281

[7] Niskanen Jr, William A (2007) Bureaucracy and Representative Government, Aldine Transaction

[8] Available at: http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTWBIGOVANTCOR/Resources/growthgov.pdf (accessed on 10.1.2019)

[9]  Available at: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/265723317_The_Impact_of_Governance_on_Economic_Growth_in_Africa (accessed on 10.1.2019)

[10] Available at: : http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/138016/jeffrey-d-sachs/government-geography-and-growth 

[11] Acemoglu, Daron and Robinson, James, (2012), Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity and Poverty, Barnes and Noble.

To be continued. 

*The writer, a former Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Sri Lanka, can be reached at waw1949@gmail.com 

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Latest comments

  • 9
    1

    These are ideas taken from market fundamentalist literature of the West. There is no guarantee that they will do good for Sri Lanka. We have to find new principles of governance such as : (i) introduce a principle of equality in a plural society so as to restore meritocracy and not give priority to one race or religion. (ii) ensure secularism so as to eliminate the power of the “Maha” Sangha that propagates political Buddhism so inconsistent with what Gautama the Buddha preached, spewing hatred towards other communities; (iii) ensure that the welfare of the least poor sections of the people are maintained at levels that make life worth living; (iv) ensure education that enables employment in cutting edge fields of the sciences and eliminate subjects like Pali, Buddhist civilisation from the curriculum; (iv) enable the young to compete with other young in India and China, the two super-powers of the future; (v) recognise the plurality of our peoples, the variability of their occupations and adopt social and economic policies accordingly. There is no point showing ability to understand Western principles. We need policies relevant to the circumstances of our people.

    • 3
      3

      C
      “(iii) ensure that the welfare of the least poor sections of the people are maintained at levels that make life worth living”
      Is it not what governments have always been doing: ensuring the welfare of the least poor sections?

      • 0
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        Thanks SJ Mea culpa. “Most poor”

  • 1
    0

    I have to share what went thru my mind when I read, ‘a diagnostic study of governance mechanism, including the anti-corruption law enforcement, by a team fielded by the Fund’. (The Fund referred to here is IMF.)
    What happens to our boast of sovereignty?
    Don’t worry. Our supreme Supreme Court is up to the task.
    It has declared that the Draft submitted on anti-corruption mechanism is inconsistent with the Constitution.
    Our sovereignty survives!
    Can the people survive is a moot point!!

    • 1
      0

      Nathan,
      This too:”The government has drafted a law on an anti-corruption mechanism, but it has been declared by the Supreme Court as inconsistent with the Constitution. Hence, the law is to be amended in line with the recommendations of the Supreme Court. It is not clear whether the amended law will be acceptable to the Fund.”
      So, the IMF, not the SC, is the supreme authority on some areas of governance.
      I am not a great fan of sovereignty, since it is mostly people like Weerasekara and Weerawansa who talk about it, so I don’t know if this is good or bad.

      • 0
        0

        old codger
        It is good to feel good about Sovereignty. It is no good to a dead man!

    • 2
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      Nathan

      “What happens to our boast of What happens to our boast of sovereignty??”

      Sorry, what is What happens to our boast of sovereignty?

      • 2
        1

        Nathan

        “What happens to our boast of What happens to our boast of sovereignty??”

        Sorry what is sovereignty?

        • 0
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          Native Vedda,
          When you were growing up you would have known that sovereign is a measure of gold. My mother was wearing a 4 sovereign necklace!

          • 1
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            We used to pawn the necklace now and then!

  • 2
    0

    Sri Lanka will not progress until there is a fair and equitable legal system in place. People had a glimmer of hope with the new administration, but things are clearly going from bad to worse. Old wine in a new bottle.

  • 2
    0

    ” the consensus among economists is that good governance is a pre-requisite for sustaining economic growth and improving the quality of life of people.”
    Exactly, Good governance is an essential component for sustaining and improving the quality of people. RW and Sirisena came to power in the name of good governance but both failed on good governance and the country went back in the hands of those proven bad governance people. The result was bangruptcy and people again chased away again but now once again gone it the so called good governance leader who also failed economically and politically. But this time he joined again with bad governance group and happily the same bad governance methodology with his group of external sponsors.

  • 3
    2

    It feels good to talk about lofty ideals like good governance, but it is another matter to practice basic things that lead to good governance and prosperity.
    Following are excerpts from Transparency International:

    We found compelling evidence that discrimination – whether on the basis of race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or belief – enables and fuels corruption, creating a vicious cycle that deepens inequality.

    Dishonest officials know that they are less likely to be held to account when they prey on marginalized communities. In a cruel doubling down, this means people already dealing with structural racism, sexism, state-sponsored homophobia or other forms of discrimination are more likely to be on the receiving end of corrupt demands.

    Double harm when corruption meets discrimination.

    Sri Lanka must first attack the basic problem of discrimination against minority communities. Then only they can foster true competition among citizens. It is a must for a truly growing economy. By favoring the Sinhalese and Buddhists will only lead to the growth of corruption, not the economy. Merit based system is the building block for a strong economic system, let alone good governance.

    Skirting around the systemic and entrenched discrimination and merely taking about good governance will not go anywhere.

  • 2
    4

    Good governance need accountability, strict administrative standards with the good leadership and a team of good characters who are prepared to honest, trustworthy and proven record of free from corruption, free from crimes. For example, Bond Scam happened during Ranil Wickremasinhe as Prime minister and he was responsile to appointing the Governor for Central Bank. As a good leader you expect to him to resign from his power. Similarly, the Easter Bomb was happened when RW as Prime Minister and Srisena as President and they should have resigned from the power. Similarly, some of the opposition party members who were elected from one party is accountable to his people and his party but they simply move from one party to other and the government give them Ministerial posts. In this case, the MP who moved from one party to other no longer eligible represent people who elected he should resign and contest for election on the new party he moved. The Government part that buy the MP from other party is bribing the MP for MInisterial power. Unfortunately, it is sad that IMF giving funds to a government that is not accountable to any failures is dangerous.

  • 5
    0

    nimal fernando

    Did you hear the land grabbing “Director General of Archaeology Professor Anura Manatunga, has resigned from his position effective July 15 after refusing to follow the president’s directive for explorations of the historic Kurindi-Maha Viharaya in Mulaitivu- https://lankasara.com/news/the-director-general-of-archaeology-resigns-after-a-disagreement-with-the-president/

    When did Ranil find his b***s?

    • 4
      1

      Native,
      https://twitter.com/NewsWireLK/status/1668169308177043456
      I don’t think Ranil ever lost his b..ls as you put it. On his basic principles, he hasn’t budged an inch. This is not to say he was or is a great democrat. The bigoted archaeology boss got a public dressing down from a President who demonstrated a deep knowledge of the subject matter. These are the officials who stand in the way of national reconciliation. The man was trying to justify a monk who had grabbed 250 acres of private and government land, which, as RW pointed out, was more than all the monuments in Anuradhapura put together.
      To those on this forum who keep repeating the catch-phrase “Ranil Rajapaksa”, the true situation is closer to “Mahinda Wickremesinghe”

      • 2
        0

        old codger

        Thanks for the link which I have already seen a few hours ago.
        I have mentioned this joint venture among land grabbing saffronistas, armed forces, and functionaries from a number of state departments such as Archaeology, Mahaweli Board, Water authorities, forestry, ….

        The arrogant professor says he could not withdraw the order that he issued.
        Will the Sinhala/Buddhist racist establishment use this clip being anti Buddhjist and arrest Ranil for ……………. whatever trumped up charges?

        And will we see nimal fernando rejoicing at the gates of Presidential Palace?

        How does Dinesh tolerate such humiliation, meted out to his Sinhala/Buddhist (whatever that is) tools?

        The so called Protection Racket under Article 9 of the constitution is the biggest organised fraud (joint venture ) which has been taking place since 1972. PS
        Article 9 of the constitution states: “The Republic of Sri Lanka shall give to Buddhism the foremost place and accordingly it shall be the duty of the State to protect and foster the Buddha Sasana while assuring to all religions the rights granted by Articles 10 and 14(1)(e).”

        • 0
          0

          Native,
          “Will the Sinhala/Buddhist racist establishment use this clip being anti Buddhjist and arrest Ranil for ……………. whatever trumped up charges?”
          Indeed he is pushing his luck, but he knows just how far he can push. He’s already got rid of that Viyathmaga governor of the EP, and 3 others. Even that idiot monk in Mihintale had to cry on TV.

          • 0
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            Native,
            A lot of racist politicians have spoken about this incident.
            I wonder why the JVP has said nothing? I would ask the JVP promoters on this forum to explain why.

    • 3
      1

      “When did Ranil find his b***s?”

      Native,

      One swallow does not a summer make.

      Hitler too patted kids heads …… he too had a few redeeming qualities. ……… or made an effort to show …….. for public consumption. :))

      • 2
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        nimal fernando

        “Hitler too patted kids heads …… he too had a few redeeming qualities. ……… or made an effort to show …….. for public consumption. :))”

        Redeeming qualities such as adhering to “strict vegetarianism” and an animal lover who shared his meals with mice. Gota too a strict vegetarian and an animal lover.

  • 3
    0

    Until and unless the Police and the Judiciary act according to the Laws of the Land and also in an impartial manner then we will see good governance and economic development. When the present AG withdraws the bribery and corruption cases filed by the previous AG (against MPs), who is now the Chief Justice clearly shows that either the CJ does not know his law, and if so how can he be the CJ or the present AG is taking illegal actions and the CJ is ignoring it. In both cases both are wrong.

  • 3
    1

    UNP LEADERS WHO SET JAFFNA ON FIRE IN 1981 – Nandana Weerarathne

    “Why is it important for the present and future generations to know what happened in Jaffna from the end of May to June 8th, 1981? That is the question we asked ourselves prior to writing this book. The concealment of these atrocities from history is a significant issue.” more from this link
    https://www.facebook.com/nandana.weerarathne/posts/pfbid08QN1fiT48fkKoAgxZiccnC232iTLrHxd48DetMFn2rxX2wvaRaFJoaAQVLyubA25l

  • 3
    0

    Both “Good Governance” and “Democracy” have been made to “CRASH LAND” in Sri Lanka under two administrations of “Rajapakses” and “Ranil Wickramasinghe”. It is needless to specify what happened to “Good Governance” and “Development” under both these “Regimes”, because all details are in records. Has any of these “Leaders” learned any lessons from their own experiences? Not at all.
    Let us see what happened after Ranil W was “Chosen” (by a vote of 134 Pohottuwa – “Rajapakses) to be the “Executive President”. (1) The country’s total “Debt” situation increased by May 2023 from USD 84.70 billion to USD 91.56 billion – an increase of USD 6.84. (2) The “Poverty” rate has increased to “32%” (as per the latest survey). (3) Most alarming of the “Survey” is “6%” of the families (in poverty levels) do not send their children to schools. (4) Health sector has fallen into alarming disarray, without medical requirements both in medicines and personnel.
    How Ranil W has commenced in interfering with the “Last Hope” of our Democracy, i.e. interference with the “Judiciary”. (1) He recently “Invited” the Judges of the Supreme Court and Appeal Courts to a “Dinner Party” held in Nuwara Eliya. To say the least, that is very “Unprecedented” at a time when several court cases are being heard in these two courts where the “President” and other Governing administration officials are cited as “Respondents”. (2)

  • 3
    0

    II: All of the above briefly stated facts need to be assessed very carefully to fathom “WHERE” Ranil W is “HEADING” and “WHAT” he is doing to this country.

    In my opinion (1) Ranil W is “Exploiting” the country’s economic, political, and social situations to establish himself as a “DICTATOR” taking a few “Lessons” from his uncle JRJ. (2) The country and the people would be “Entrapped” in a “Himalayan” type “DEBT TRAP” that which NO OTHER could disentangle who will be at the “MERCY” of “Foreign Hawks” who have by then purchased our “National Assets”.

    I consider this “BEHAVIOR” of Ranil W in “Over Acting” mode as the “Executive President” to be “PSYCHOPATHIC” especially after his “Punishing and Degrading Defeat” at the last Parliamentary Election. This man is a “DANGER” and the sooner he is “DISARMED” the better for the country and the people.

    • 0
      0

      Simon,
      “In my opinion (1) Ranil W is “Exploiting” the country’s economic, political, and social situations to establish himself as a “DICTATOR” taking a few “Lessons” from his uncle JRJ. “
      A gentle reminder. When you use quotation marks like that in English, you are implying that what is inside is not what it is supposed to be, maybe even the opposite. Ask Sinhala Man.

      • 1
        0

        OC: Thank you.

  • 4
    0

    Nandana Weerarathne, my heartfelt ‘Thank you’.
    Anpu, Appreciate.

  • 5
    1

    Readers
    I think the worst thing a president could do to a country is to use religious or ethnic sentiments to divide the masses. It destroys countries from within.
    Trump used this tactic in the US and Rajapaksas used it to the hilt in SRI Lanka. Not to mention this tactic was the weapon used by Britain to subdue the locals during British rule.
    Of course the British would not have given a hoot as they were invaders and the welfare of their subjects was not their priority, actually the opposite was their mission.
    A president who is not using divide and rule tactics must be respected regardless of weather we like him or not.
    A united country is the basic necessity for its development. Cheap politicians don’t care about nation building, they are only concerned about their personal milage just as the British did with their colonies.
    RW maybe guilty of some degree of autocracy but he is not definitely not playing us against each other as the Rajapaksa scum did.
    Think about it.

  • 1
    0

    In my comment Part I, (2) was missing. This is what I stated. I referred to the recent appointments made by Ranil W to the Supreme Court. Out of the FOUR appointed, TWO are the most controversial, in that, he has appointed Tikiri Jayathilaka from the Parliamentary Secretariat and Naiani Nirmala, a “Junior” Lawyer from the AG’s Department overlooking many of the “Seniors” serving. The Judiciary Services Association vehemently objected to these “Two” appointments as that undermines the promotional prospects of those in the Judiciary Services and tends to erode the confidence in the Judiciary. This is a “REPETITION” of what “Rajapakses” did when in power.

    This “Interference” with the Judiciary as briefly stated by me has eroded the least “Ray of Hope” that the people have in the “Democracy”. Shouldn’t this “CULTURE” be DONE AWAY with and CHANGE the “SYSTEMS”?

  • 5
    0

    Economic and philosophical analysis of the governments and governance in Sri Lanka are a waste of time. The IMF requirements of anti-corruption could easily have been met if the ruling class had an interest. They do not have an interest because they are corrupt to the core. What use is a new law or new constitution or new whatever, if the people who are responsible are themselves as corrupt as can be? In Sinhala there is a saying ” Watath niyarath goyam ka nam karter pawasami ey amaaruwer” What is required urgently is a people’s legitimate and completely legal uprising that reclaims the country from the clutches of a vermin parasitic scumbag political class that has been destroying the country.

    • 1
      0

      L.P.
      You have stated the truth.
      Our are corrupt and self serving.
      First and foremost they are the same bunch of idiots we have been recycling over and over in various forms and capacities.
      If you go back in history you will find that, their beginning was their fore fathers special connections with the colonial masters.
      In other words when the British gave us independence they placed their henchmen in charge.
      Since then, the same set and their relatives have been in charge.
      Essentially they are continuing with the colonial attitude when dealing with SRI Lankan citizens.

    • 2
      0

      I agree with Mr Pethiyagoda. We had laws on bribery and a bribery commission entrenched in the constitution. It did not stop bribery. The dirty politician always stacks such institutions with his own cronies so as to avoid scrutiny. The money gained is used to buy votes. So, the problem continues. It is easy to recover the stolen wealth. All that is required is to invoke procedures available virtually free of charge provided by foreign governments like the US and institutions like the World Bank. Why does the government not do it. Because, the guys in control are involved.

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