17 December, 2017

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Pronunciation: Charlie Choplin

By Jagath Asoka

Dr. Jagath Asoka

Recently, I have read several articles—on Colombo Telegraph—related to mispronunciation. I have something to say about this subject. Here is a small dose of my opinion, even though I know that you are not eager to have me opine about this stentorian topic; even though I am not qualified to make pronouncements about pronunciation, I believe that self-deprecation is an admirable quality, and I am not embarrassed to share my experience; I invite you to share your own experience with us. 

Every day, I struggle with my accent and pronunciation: a double whammy. My son Rocco is the only person who can clearly understand me; with others, now and then, I have to repeat or paraphrase, especially over the phone. Probably that is why I prefer writing instead of talking to people, because if you chose to read what I have written, I do not have to pronounce, repeat, or paraphrase. There is another side to this double whammy; once I was a consultant for an American company that did business with a Chinese company: My job was to paraphrase and translate Chinese English into American English without making it obvious to our Chinese partners; this is the only time I ever felt proud of my oral language skills; I felt like I was the mediator, facilitating a conversation between a blind and a deaf person.

When it comes to pronunciation, there are people who do not give the subject a second thought. Their attitude is: Say it the way you want it; no one cares about your pronunciation; it is inarticulateness, not pronunciation that matters. Would you say to your own children, “There are no mistakes; don’t worry about diction, syntax, grammar, spelling, and pronunciation because they are useless and boring.” Here is my question to you: Do you easily swallow this nonsense, an invitation to disaster?

You can become a millionaire or President of the United States, even with your beastly mispronunciation, but still you may be ridiculed.

I do not know about you, but when I do not know how to pronounce a word, I usually consult a dictionary; however, here is the problem:  Most of the time, I think—but I am wrong most of the time—my pronunciation is not that beastly. Then there is another inherent problem: consult various leading American dictionaries to find out how to pronounce W, the only letter in the English alphabet that commands more than one syllable; you will find four variants, but it deserves only one pronunciation— clear and dignified: DUHB-ul-YOO (like double you). Now, you know how to pronounce “George W. Bush.”

When I was a kid—growing up in Sri Lanka—most people in my neighborhood spoke English. So, I was a listener, not a talker. In my neighborhood, if you were to mispronounce a word, that mispronunciation would become your first name, and you would be known by that name for the rest of your life in that circle. One of my friends inherited the sobriquet Charlie Choplin because he mispronounced Charlie Chaplin. Afterwards, facetiously, we used the pronunciation Charlie Choplin so often that when someone said “Charlie Chaplin,” we would laugh at them. Now, here is the rest of the story: It has been almost forty years since I initially left Sri Lanka. Those who ridiculed others were unaware of their own beastly mispronunciations; I learned some of these beastly mispronunciations from the Sri Lankan elite, and I am still struggling to unlearn them; here are some simple examples:

Even though Sri Lankans do not say “lice” instead of “rice,” yegg instead of egg, or pee instead of be, they say flim instead of film. Before we talk about pronunciation, let me ask you a simple question: how do you pronounce the word “pronunciation?” Is it pro-noun-ciation or pro-nun-ciation? Listen to the people around you: some say pro-noun-ciation instead of pro-nun-ciation. There is no pronoun in pronunciation.

Most Sri Lankans pronounce zoo in zoology, zoologist, and zoological. There is no zoo in zoology (Zoh-AHL-uh-jee), zoologist (Zoh-AHL-uh-jist), and zoological (ZOH-uh-LAHJ-i-kul).    

I can list so many other words where I am still trying to unlearn my Sri Lankan pronunciations, but I do not think that is apposite.

If you do not care about your diction and pronunciation, read the following two stories about mumpsimus and malapropism.

According to an apocryphal story, a poorly educated Catholic priest during a Latin mass wanted to say, “Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine (What we have received orally, Lord),” instead of sumpsimus (we have received), he said the non-word mumpsimus. He kept repeating his erroneous usage even after being made aware of.  Now, both sumpsimus and mumpsimus are real English words: mumpsimus, adherence to or persistence in an erroneous use of language, out of habit or obstinacy (opposed to sumpsimus, adherence to or persistence in using a strictly correct term).

In Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s 1775 play The Rivals, Mrs. Malaprop often mistakenly uses a word that sounds like another word but that has a very different meaning. Here is an example: “Sure, if I reprehend anything in this world it is the use of my oracular tongue, and a nice derangement of epitaphs! Here is the corrected version: “If I apprehend anything in this world, it is the use of my vernacular tongue, and a nice arrangement of epithets.”

Here is my naked truth: I am guilty of mispronunciation, malapropism, and mumpsimus.

I am certain that some of you would say, “We are not guilty.” I would say, “Yes, I agree. I am pretty sure that you have seen unicorns, too.”

All of us make beastly mistakes, but if you keep denying them, you will end up being Mrs. Mumpsimus Malaprop.

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Latest comments

  • 5
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    Mr Jagath Asoka,

    You have raised some very valid points. ————— Just to add my 2cents worth ………….

    But the important question that needs to be answered, …………… to whom does the language belong? Does it belong to the English? …………… Americans? Canadians? Australians? New Zealanders? …….. Each of these groups who speak English as their main language have their own pronunciations. …….. If the English language belong to the English, how about the different pronunciations/accents that are unique to different classes/regions ………… of England itself? It’s the same in the USA where the South has a very distinct accent. ……… I think we have to accept that pronunciation evolves with the passage of time and migration. Then, if someday Blacks overtake the White population in America, Hip-Hop will be considered the proper way to pronounce/speak English. ………………….

    ……….. Pronunciation is a moving target, never a bullseye.

    Lanka is well advanced in the process; SL English newsreaders speak with accents totally plucked out of thin air …….. never come across anywhere else in the world. All credit to them …………… innovate, innovate, innovate.

    • 2
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      Nimal F,
      “Lanka is well advanced in the process; SL English newsreaders speak with accents totally plucked out of thin air …….. never come across anywhere else in the world.”
      Ha ha, so you noticed?
      I think this accent comes from a point equidistant between LA, NY, and London. Go figure.

    • 3
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      as of you buddy,
      Just to be a Luddite libturd, you will never want to learn voice, speech and communication. Lankawe the Rilawoo take shade under a useless tree beg borrow, steal and get sexually aroused so they miss the point. .They stole the missionary schools opening a Pandora’s Box for citizens to drink tea like farmers hot croako seated on toadstools and cheer the croak-et team.
      in any given country there are set standards Its silent like sound of silence.- it’s like listening to the voice of an angel. It’s like listening to music for the abled and disabled.

      • 0
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        Hey Zorro buddy,

        I was just waiting for you to appear. How’s the world treating you?

        There was a major psychiatric hospital in Woodford ……….. Wiki tells me it’s now closed down. Hope you had no hand in it? A one man demolition job, eh? :))

        Anyway, if people come to you and ask you to try on a straightjacket for size …………… under any circumstances do not fall for it.

        Gotta do my Mother Theresa bit for humanity.

        Hope to see you tomorrow, hale and hearty on the “outside.”

        PS I came across a piece you can read to improve your pseudo-profundity graffiti; just can’t find it, now. Shall post when I do.

        Take care.

        • 0
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          “”I was just waiting for you to appear. How’s the world treating you?””🙉
          Never too bad- a rolling stone gathers no moss.
          Dictators(Rilawoo) free themselves, but they enslave the people. Charlie Chaplin

          “”There was a major psychiatric hospital in Woodford ……….. Wiki tells me it’s now closed down. Hope you had no hand in it? A one man demolition job, eh? :))””

          Even the lamas while meditating practice Voice, speech and communication
          😂Budai : The Laughing Buddha 😊

          “Anyway, if people come to you and ask you to try on a straightjacket for size …………… under any circumstances do not fall for it.”

          Thank goodness my pop always took me to our local `Savile Row` down cotta road then. I don’t bother anymore, it just flows.

          “PS I came across a piece you can read to improve your pseudo-profundity graffiti; ” Better you play Ludo or snakes and ladders as this guy is beyond your imagination.
          talk to later buddy.

          • 0
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            Hey Zorro buddy,

            “this guy is beyond your imagination.”

            Didn’t I know that! That’s why I take the time to talk to you and treat you with the utmost respect.

            What I like about you is that, on your best days, you are even beyond your own imagination.

            Aren’t you lucky, finally you have found a friend? Now, stay safe until we talk again.

            • 0
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              . A troubled nation is trouble and it pulls us down down into double trouble and a never ending trouble. talk to you soon too .
              I put the busy sign on- don’t knock only by appointment.;)

  • 3
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    I ‘d like to add that there will always be a mismatch going from one language to the other. When going from ‘Sinhala to English’ modern Sinhala lacks vowel sound variances of “or” such as in ‘Watt’ or ‘Electron’ as well as variances of “er” like ” in ‘Hertz’. Also modern Sinhala still lacks the consonant ‘Z’. But ‘Z’ can be simulated by pouncing consonants ‘da’ or ‘ta’ and ‘sa’ simultaneously. For example ‘Zinc’ and ‘Zirconium’ can be pronounced ‘dsinc/tsinc’ and ‘dsirconium/tsirconium’. Sinhala lacked a consonant ‘F’ for a long time but that was finally added. There are many issues when going from ‘Tamil to English’ too. It is quite common to have impedances when moving away from ones native tongue. Heck, when it comes pronouncing there so many accents within the English language either in England itself or outside like the US or Australia. When I say ‘Data’ (Dayta) in Australia they respond back saying, ‘You mean Data (Dartar) right?’

  • 4
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    Thanks. I love your writing. Long time no see Mr Jagath Asoka. Where had you been all the months ?

    We ve all been facing the same problem regardless of where we are on this planet right ? You have articulated it as no other – yes, I hate repeating them on the phone just because ours is accompanied with accsents. Accents being added to any language is there, be it in America, Germany or Srilanka is no differene. Late Mr Kadirgamar was one of the good orators but he too had his own accent in English. So was the case with late N Mandela. Latter s pronunciation was very unique to him.

  • 3
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    Often mispronunciation does not lead to a breakdown in communication within a group.
    However a word is pronounced, what matters in the end is effective communication.

    • 4
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      “”what matters in the end is effective communication.
      “”
      like` tattu` and lose the match without scoring.-

      `word` the first step to ignorance and `definition` the second step to ignorance…..

      • 3
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        The main function of language is effective communication.
        One can be correct in spelling, grammar, syntax and even choice of words and pronunciation, but can still be ineffective in communicating his/her thoughts.
        Another can err in one or more of the above respects, but still get the idea across.
        Which is more desirable?

        • 3
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          “”Which is more desirable?””
          sound of silence is the most effective way of seeing things and observing people walk by at a junction- see how funny they are then you realise your own folly.
          your aim like a corbyn is to bring down an exclusive urban elite and place your hat there as a future dictator Mr malabari.
          over 21- voice speech and communication conditioning- 40 hours 10 weeks and practiced for 6 months you are in a class of your own Very specialised executive voice for business, making your voice heard; several subsets like in the choir – it’s your choice and profession you plan to take. of course you need to be constantly reading and listening to what the other’s interest are to be one step ahead always- be prepared. most profs like you never read outside of your study because you were politically entangled- waffel waffel burp.

          • 0
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            Falihax
            I raised a question hardly realising that you are one that belongs to neither category.

            • 1
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              belonging?? your mom or pop do not own the island but pattapu.
              you are not the man to categorise because statistical averages is not equivalent to each and every frog.
              Who gave you the qualification of prof?? just beat it

  • 1
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    In the old days, we used to laugh at the Indians. That was a generation back when we did take some pride in speaking english. Now, the Indians, speak much better probably because many of them man call centres which serve UK and US customers. They are trained to adopt new accents and this has seeped into the populace. We have gone backwards in this area, largely because of our nationalistic visions, extolling the past and forgetting that English and other languages including Mandarin Chinese and Hindi are the passports to the future.

    That having been said, English is not standard. There are many accents in England and of course elsewhere. Quite apart from accents, the structure of sentences also vary. We translate patterns in Sinhala and Tamil, which coincidentally are uniform. The example is come, come and sit sit. Vango, Vango, vanthu irunko;; enda, ends, inthaganda, inthaganda. Why should we change these patterns?

    But, in the commercial field, uniformity is essential. Many of us, have one accent for our family and friends and a different one for foreigners. In the modern world, we have to learn to alter to the situation. But, English knowledge is a must.

    I know this for certain when I was an undergraduate. Those in the Sinhala and Tamil medium will miss their lectures because they were next to useless. But, they will not miss the English Intensive Course classes, which were the only good things going.

    • 2
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      “In the old days, we used to laugh at the Indians.”
      India to Ceylon as mapped by the anglo americans- 3.287 million km²- 65,610 km²
      You never met the boys from missionary schools what a pity you never travelled.
      How small the heavens are, a toad can tell;
      He’s seen them! – from the bottom of the well.

  • 0
    1

    It’s so refreshing to read Mr.Jagath Asoka after a long time ! Welcome home, Sir and Thank you kindly !

    As usual, you have embarked on writing about another interesting subject, about English accents.

    Pronunciations are always unique to each and every speaker, whether it’s English or even any other language. English language is spoken in many countries and it basically depends on their native mother tongue, the society they grew up, the colleges they learned and where they live/work at present.

    We laugh at the English accents of Australians, South Indians, Chinese, Blacks/Jamaicans/Carribian and Tamil accents of the estate Indians while the Estate Indians laugh at Jaffna Tamil accent and SL Muslims Tamil accents…It’s all just fun things we enjoy at the expense of other speakers. No big deal, though !

    So do all the Spanish speakers of Latin American countries. Same language with so many different country based accents. Most British think that they speak the best English with perfect accent and mock other speakers, while Americans mock British accents. It’s not easy to change the accents of English language, we are so used to speak from the beginning.

  • 0
    1

    Both men and women newsreaders in the BBC Global Service speak attractively – a form of English that may be acceptable to all English speaking countries. Of course, the men have traces of OxCam pronunciation – so what. Yes, India has moved ahead
    of Sri Lanka in the quality of English. Among the reasons may be they did not totally
    discard or devalue English – for cheap political reasons. The other is the large number of Indian students post-WW2 in the UK, USA, Canada, Australia and so on. In some of these countries Indians dominate the news-reading scene on TV and Radio – part of which advantage should, alas, have been ours except to diabolical narrow nationalism of 1956. Until recently Ceylonese/Sri Lankans had a strong presence in news-reading in the BBC.

    Kettikaran

    • 4
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      “”Of course, the men have traces of OxCam pronunciation – so what.??”
      Aren’t you wearing a sheepskin outside, while hiding a tiger’s heart inside?

      “have been ours except to diabolical narrow nationalism of 1956.”
      The practical effect took place only from 1970.
      As a silent observer I am aware that many of Colombo Chetties sold their soul and they could laugh at Northern person’s pronunciation and communication of the English language.
      standalone lingua, Now go fetch !

  • 2
    0

    Here is a comment I had made on July 20, 2017 21:18 under ‘So Who Are We Laughing At, Really?’, authored by MALINDA SENEVIRATNE, JULY 20, 2017.

    ‘A language gains status not by its users but by its usage. In Sri Lanka English is spoken as a status symbol. Those who know a little laugh at those who know nothing; Those who know a little more laugh at nearly all. Do not pay attention to the pronunciation. Give credit to enunciation and diction’.

    Now, let me comment further.

    Pronunciation is dictated not by the individual who speaks the language, but by the environment to which he belongs. A child of a non-native, born and living among British children in London, pronounces English the same way the local children do. Subtle differences are due to the influence of the environment at home.

    You may be able to spot the difference between a child from Colombo and a child from another town in SL. But, a foreigner sees no difference!

    What is essential is clarity in delivery and contextual vocabulary. I keep learning every day.

    If you are in Sri Lanka, keep listening to western channels. You’ll see a marked improvement in no time!

    • 1
      2

      “In Sri Lanka English is spoken as a status symbol” yes Royalist and Thomians English is “pater bugger machhan” and mater bugger machhan and that is it

      • 0
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        If you have something against Royalists and Thomians, let that not overtake your emotions. The English spoken in those two schools is par excellence. By the way, it is ‘machchang’ not ‘machchan’. That’s the language among chums. Any problem?

        • 0
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          having your read both your comments You are what I call puss pan (the stupid blues of lanka) or the kid is know as Henry Pooey when he visits mainland china.
          The educated of the world have a flat accent which is understood by all.

          FOB:Free on board Tome: the patchwork language, the patchwork faith, a patchwork culture.

          FOB: Free on board Royal: Governments servants pride that’s where the chit begins.

          Neither shines beyond school at international level in the sciences or technological world because of mediocre surroundings of the Rilawoo dictated island.
          On my first visit guide/translator at mainland (neither Beijing or Shanghai) over 2 decades ago was a Chinese kid of 9+ years who lived with her granddad most of the time as both parents (a stepfather) were working hard at Sinopec to maintain 3 kids- a perfect pronunciation with no hint of Chinese accent and toggled between both. She told me her teacher was a Romanian and she liked blogging and making friends overseas to join the Foreign Service one day by coming out first rank first at an exam. And she presently is!

          • 0
            0

            …. a perfect pronunciation with no hint of Chinese accent and toggled between both. She told me her teacher was a Romanian …

            Did she speak English like a Romanian ?

            • 0
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              demala is being jealous- that is one of the classic jt weaknesses.
              What an idiot it’s about training of vocal chords and maintaining them.
              In the UK they teach American accents for actors- NABS and GAA standard. It’s not necessary that the lecturer be american.

            • 0
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              Now that you are holed in the US If you had only asked as to what speech is in demand and pays well in the US and for Canada . than make distinctions!(sic)
              Clear Speech: If you seek greater clarity and confidence in how you communicate. Suitable if English is your first language and you speak with an international (Australian/American) accent or one that defines your heritage or region of the country. (check headhunters if you are qualified in any field)

      • 0
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        Royalist and Thomians English is “pater bugger machhan” and mater bugger machhan and that is it

        fashionable -nonconformist- of a new found glory.
        it depends on your home

      • 0
        0

        This Royal-St.Thomas/Trinity assumed superiority days is now
        history. Just as well. That was a frog in the well attitude. It was a
        subtle colonialist kind of conspiracy that kept the sons of the soil
        out. Look at what happened to Cricket – and now it is happening to
        Rugby. If the right teachers and financial resources are made available children from the more humbler schools throughout the country will excel in English – as did many students in the Central Schools of decades ago. I am not against the more elitist schools in Colombo/Kandy but a level playing field is the need of the day
        – in studies and Sports. Give this a try and I bet the students in
        the North-East will break records.

        Devanam Piyadasa

  • 1
    2

    Pronunciation is very local – as in “My Fair Lady”.
    British politicians have fun (not despairingly) of Julia Gillard’s accent – she immigrated to Australia from UK.
    The American pronunciation is not only different but so is spelling.
    Australians make fun of Chinese pronunciation – Two wongs do not make a white (Two wrongs do not make a right)!
    Indian pronunciation is of course different – remember Peter Sellers. But the last Bastian of English is India. Where else do they teach Shakespeare?

  • 0
    2

    a refreshing article in CT. My story about pronunciation goes back to when Sri Lanka got test status in Cricket. England were touring Sri Lanka. A famous journalist was sent to Sri Lanka to tour the country and write about the cricket and cricket fever in Sri Lanka. The journalist (I hold back the name) was talking to the ordinary folks. According to the journalist one guy in his sarong was cycling and saw the crowd gathering around this white man talking to people. The guy in sarong got off the bicycle in a scissor manner (I leave it to your imagination). He approached the journalist and said and I quote >>>>>”I look forward to seeing “Iron Bottom”” batting and bowling.>>>
    who is this Iron Bottom>>>? I leave it to the cricketing aficionados to guess.

    • 0
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      The English player is famous for his charity and Knighted for his charity work…he in fact did a charity walk in Sri Lanka and now a cricket commentator on Sky Sports….the one and only >>>>>Ian Botham>>>>>for Sri Lankans Iron Bottom

  • 0
    2

    apart from my cricketing illustration posted earlier and which is true; here is my take on pronunciation. There is an overlap between pronunciation and accent. Even in England the mother country of the English Language there is different dialect and accent and pronunciation. The cockney , the Brum , the gerodie, the Scottish the Irish, etc etc…>>>I work in the IT Consultancy industry. As you may all know India is dominating this industry. These days long Tamil and Indian names will roll out of the English tongue with ease….and the Indians contribute to the discussions and meeting in their weird pronunciation and accent and what more we have conference calls linking Europe, Americas and Asias and we all understand what each other is saying…..so there you go its a matter of “the situation forcing one to adopt and learn.

    • 1
      1

      Rajash

      There is a fine TN fellow named Subramaniam in a New York office
      where they design naval equipment.
      To avoid pronunciation hazards, his colleagues there call him Submarine. He takes it with a smile and the office functions well
      and in ethnic harmony.

      Pandaranayagam

      • 1
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        Will we ever dare to do that to a Suddha’s name and get away with it?

        • 0
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          yes, because they have a sense of humour and would not mind if you pronounced it in your language.

          • 1
            1

            We laugh at ourselves for our inability to pronounce English ‘properly ‘.
            Much of their humor is laughing at others.
            They can be patronising too and quite a few of us like being patronised

            • 0
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              “”We laugh at ourselves for our inability to pronounce English ‘properly ‘.”
              I laugh openly laugh at the english people for when they pronounce a proper noun eg Mahatma Gandhi (BBC)- You should learn to converse in several languages to be able to do that- i am not a linguist.
              “”Much of their humor is laughing at others.””
              Pity you live in a small world. One can easily laugh at the abstract.

              “”They can be patronising too and quite a few of us like being patronised”
              then the shameless fool is only spilling the beans on first take. You need to first spend some time on what you can’t do then non fools you.
              Go find your parachute maker. It’s like the Neanderthal seeking over here.

              • 0
                0

                Falihax
                I raised a question hardly realising that you are one that belongs to neither category.

              • 0
                0

                Donald Quak
                I raised a question hardly realising that you are another that belongs to neither category.

                • 0
                  0

                  Senile Jackall,
                  My language flows like when rivers meet because I always thought in english unlike you village demala of the north.

                  • 0
                    0

                    Are you serious?
                    Try thinking for a start.

                    • 0
                      0

                      seriously slime flies!

                    • 0
                      5

                      Try harder D. With luck, you may produce a seemingly intelligent comment.

                    • 3
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                      S_everely J_aundiced,🤤

                      You’re so intelligent when you gape, what a mouth! and what breath!
                      standalone inside traders, conmen of the world, suicide bombers like isis,….pungent to the core!!
                      Encore!! 🤑🤑

      • 0
        3

        well I have a friend Thiruganasambanthamoorthy working for HSBC Bank. His English colleagues call him Thiru Etc

        • 1
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          Should be most flattering!

          • 4
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            flattering??
            Its anglo-american culture. & in Rajash colleagues case an IT `nick`

            bootless village rat that nibbles at a cat’s tail invites a battering.

    • 4
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      I can promise you that the Chinese are getting back at the Indians firstly by not supplying the hardware and forcing the politicking Indians that they too are fluent at and have an edge over the Indians because of their unreserved humour.

  • 3
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    …..’When I was a kid—growing up in Sri Lanka—most people in my neighborhood spoke English.’……??????? Really! Dr Asoka, where was that sort of neighbourhood?

    In the Ceylon/Sri Lanka that I grew up in, in the Western Province, outside of Colombo, the majority in our neighbourhood spoke Sinhalese. We learnt our English from our outstanding English teachers, reading umpteen books borrowed from the British Council and USIS library and listening to the excellent Radio Ceylon, and BBC World Service broadcasts. Yes, we did laugh at our mistakes but the elders in our community frowned on the ridiculing of those who made mistakes. Yes, there were the less fortunate who learnt their English at the ‘man-woke-onthara-bijja’ English ‘class’, but we tried to understand them rather than laugh at, or ridicule, them. We did have a community that spoke English as a mother tongue – the Burghers – but they evaporated to foreign climes catalysed by the overnight promotion of the Sinhala-Only act by a proper Banda.

    Dr Asoka, something you highlight here – our local practice of laughing and ridiculing those who made mistakes – is the biggest downer to the confidence of our children and young people as it stifles and demotivates. The sooner we can wean ourselves off it, the better.

    • 6
      0

      Really! Dr Asoka, where was that sort of neighbourhood?
      An exclusive urban elite!
      He is a guy who moved to flower road Colombo 7 due to his pops hard work and not the Negombo fishing village enclave that you are accustomed to.
      “The sooner we can wean ourselves off it, the better.””-
      English tolerance makes spoilt kids with confidence.
      Look at the brighter side of it too under competition those that are laughed at lock themselves up for a semester and come out shining – I have observed this with Indians and foreign students and others in their penultimate and final semesters. Unlike SL politics is taboo (at technical colleges of high level- some tamils from jaffna tried it and were restricted) and the going is tough competition. While UK is going to the dogs, with politicians making speeches at schools and grooming kids into the confidence of waffle waffle burp.

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