25 June, 2019

Blog

The Broken Palmyra Under The Broken Chair

By Keerthi Weerasooriya

Geneva is the headquarters of the United Nations in Europe from 1946; it was a very logical choice as buildings, facilities and the environment for the United Nations was available from the failed institution of the League of Nations (one of the earliest institutions that could not prevent war). The wide open large square in front of the Palais des Nations (Palace of Nations) is dominated by the monumental sculpture of a Broken Chair (a 12 metre high chair with one leg shattered) which was initially an advocacy tool for getting the countries to sign the Ottawa Treaty on Landmines. The treaty came into effect in 1999 and at present 162 nations have signed it (including Sri Lanka), but notable absentees are the United States, Russia and China; those who preach must also do? That does not appear to be so for landmines.

The large square in front of the Palais is a playground (when it is not otherwise occupied!) for families with little children prancing around trying to avoid the water jets or maybe even not avoiding them. It is often “otherwise occupied” as a platform for peaceful civil protests on varying causes. Last Friday (14th September) there was a large protest with the loudspeakers on the occupation of Tibet by China with the flag of Tibet, pictures of the Dalai llama, Tibetan Buddhist chants all amplified by big loudspeakers in an attempt to reach the United Nations buildings situated far in the well-maintained gardens. On the sides were stacked very neatly but not on display, the posters of “Tamil Genocide” with no security whatsoever.

The Demonstration which was …  ?

On Monday (17th) the demonstrations for the UN to take note of the “Tamil Genocide” began in full earnest at noon. Unlike previous demonstrations on this subject (which had pan-European participation), this appeared to be a “Swiss” affair with no buses from other European countries. It appeared to be an “internal” affair with the speeches in Tamil and an occasional speech in English. The usual posters of the Leader, and the Map of the Nation being advocated were waived but placards were also of a very useful size to shade those waving it from the fierce uncharacteristic September sun of Geneva. In some aspects it was a family affair with the ten year old daughter wearing the best party dress and the younger brother wearing an unfamiliar bow. The merchant side of the community was also taken note of – tasty rice packets and the standard propaganda paraphernalia. While the fiery speeches were going on in the raised platform, the crowd (which was about 2000) was having their own amiable conversations, greeting each other and breaking off to applaud and raise a cheer when the speaker made a very loud point. The Geneva City Police had assessed this to be a meeting with very little potential for disturbance and there was only one police van with seven policeman, some standing around in the sun and others dozing inside the van.

Many decades ago

Propaganda badges were being sold by lithesome young girls; when they asked me to purchase a badge, I politely mentioned I was Sinhalese and they quickly turned away with no engagement. These lasses reminded me of the batch mates from Jaffna that I used to flirt with in my university days a long long time ago. These same batch mates will be at a “batch reunion” in Sri Lanka, are now valued professionals in the countries they are resident. It was the general trend of a minority of the batch remaining in Sri Lanka and majority seeking pastures abroad that made them migrate – there would have been in equal proportions of the Sinhalese and Tamil.

Some ironies in the Posters

The posters that were put out had scenes from the war especially in the last few weeks – death and destruction played a prominent role. However there were ironic twists – in the background of two pictures was a Department Of Health ambulance with the state logo. In another picture there were soldiers guarding a group of women seated on the ground who all seemed reassured. Where in other civil conflicts did the government from the opposite side pay for the health services and treatment for combatants on the opposing side? In contrast there were multiple pictures of victims with bandages, broken limbs and, refugees superimposed on fireballs. There were the familiar pictures of “before” and “after” (with bullet wounds) of prominent personalities – it did remind me of the cruelties of war and also of that there were no before and after of the massacres in Anuradhapura.

One of the speeches was in English, making the standard demand of an international investigation. There was the routine applause and I managed to engage the speaker sometime later on a long conversation in a very civil manner amidst the fiery speeches that continued. It was clear to those surrounding us, that  it was Tamil and Sinhalese discussion (in English) but there were no comments or menacing gestures; friends of the speaker came, shook hands said a few word in Tamil and went away. 

Who are the culprits?

I asked the speaker – Were demonstrations like this useful or would it have been more constructive to advocate for change within Sri Lanka itself? Clearly the diaspora would not return as they were comfortable in Switzerland but would continue to advocate to maintain their identity. I had no reply to the accusation of a Minister of the government being the leader of the group that burnt down the library in Jaffna – that was the murder of the soul of a community. However later on, no government could stand by when there was advocacy for disembowelment of the country and arms had to be met with arms. The accusation was that there was room for negotiation but that was not taken by the government – a very dubious on given the evidence that accumulated that Times of Peace were used to accumulating arms.  One aspect that we both agreed upon was that politicians from both sides (and that was not only UNP/SLFP but Sinhalese and Tamil) who were the root cause for short-term political gain and power. Would the majority Sinhalese population allow the minority to exist – what has been the role of the Buddhist clergy in advocating for peace? At least he agreed that the recent jail sentence on the most unBuddhistic individuals had been a step in the correct direction. However I could not think of a recent prominent call for National Peace from the Buddhist clergy.

But back to the question whether this type of demonstrations for a separate state are useful? The speaker mentioned that this is the staking out of a position to begin negotiations – a separate state would then be rolled down to a federated country with devolved responsibilities. Theoretically good, but we are despondent of the irresponsible activities of these devolved governing bodies right throughout the country. Where is the control of the provincial councils?

Transparency – not only for the North but for the whole of the country 

The plea was for the citizens in the North to be given a chance to have a normal life – the lands that were taken away are being given back but as forest land with no preparation. The government has a responsibility to at least clear it and return. Does it? If land had been taken over in the other parts of the country, would it have been cleared and returned? The Chief Minister of the Northern Provincial Council had asked for a special fund for development of the province; this had been denied but then I asked him whether such funds should be granted to all Chief Ministers of the Provincial Councils? How could it be ensured that the funds were being spent properly? An idea – why not have all the details of the expenditure on the Internet not only in the North but in all Provincial Councils? That would enable citizens to monitor the expenses.

The recent book – proceeds to War Widows on both sides

I then mentioned the recent book by Ajit Kanagasundaram; he was unfamiliar with it but when I mentioned that the proceeds will be to the War Widows on both sides there was no protests – those who had suffered need to be supported. Additionally when I asked him that when he talked about those who committed human rights abuses should be held accountable, I asked him whether that was from both sides or from the Army only. He had no objection to the abuses from both sides being investigated. A bit ironic as the posters writ large the Leader who should be at the front of the queue if the abuses on that side were to be investigated and with the fiery speeches still going on.

The very very beginning ..

I then brought up the beginning of the armed conflict which was the standardisation for the Advanced Level marks in the 1970s – this deprived a large educated section of the Tamil youth, the opportunity to advance in life. However the good results at the Advanced Level, they were a result of studying as well as good educational facilities. Those from the educationally disadvantaged areas  could study as hard but not achieve the same results. That there should be some “positive discrimination” for those in the educationally disadvantaged sectors is now a widely accepted principle, provided that it is implemented transparently and fairly. The students in Colombo, Gampaha and Jaffna had to scale the same high barrier to get into university irrespective of whether they were Tamil or Sinhalese. 

Oxford and Cambridge universities accept students with lower grades from the state schools (which have lesser facilities) and have a higher level for acceptance for students from the privileged Private Schools. When the final results are compared at the end of the undergraduate course, those from the state schools had proportionately done much better indicating that the “bar” should have been even lower for the students from the state schools. (Will the University Grants commission release this type of results for the Sri Lankan university system?). 

There was no meeting of minds with the speaker on this – he insisted that examination results and intelligence must be the one and only criterion. Thus the village students (this would have included the educationally disadvantaged areas of the Northern and Eastern province) would have continued to be at the end of the queue according to him. So was the struggle for all Tamil students or for those who were disadvantaged by standardisation?

Standardisation was not a permanent solution – there should have been a period of intensee resource allocation to those disadvantaged areas for a specific period of time and then all would have been equal before the Advanced Level examination. Again, the shortsighted aims of the politicians and rulers continue.

Is the diaspora being Civic Minded or was it the threat of a fine?

The conversation ended as the speaker had to go for another meeting at the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights. I wandered around looking at the posters, the rice packets being sold and the books which recorded the history from the other side; should I purchase these books to understand the conflict better or would that be contributing to a course that had no interest in a dispassionate independent narrative. In the end, I did not purchase the books. I then went back to my office wondering what has been learned and what would be useful for the future. I passed the square again at 7.30 p.m. (yes, it was still daylight) and it was neat, swept clean and ready for the next demonstration. Was it the diaspora being more civic minded than the standard Sri Lankan (both Sinhalese and Tamil) or the threat of a fine by the city of Geneva municipal authorities?!

So what can we do?

And so what can we do – can we depend on our politicians and rulers to heal the wounds and bring us together? Maybe some of them will try but despite the history that we saw in the past 30 years their short-sighted and enriching and serving themselves will continue. There is little hope at the high level of rulers, politicians and governance.

Is there a possibility of a bottom–up approach?

Sri Lanka has had the bottom-up approach which produced results – in 1956 the disenfranchised majority of Sinhalese claimed their place in society by using the electoral power. In 1970, the village youth through their insurrection brought about major changes such as land ownership, fair sharing of resources but this was not through an electoral revolution. It may have been self-preservation of the politicians who feared that they would not survive the second insurrection. In the 1990s in the South, that was not a social movement but a fight between the government and a dictatorial political party aiming to take power. That party learnt its lessons and now appears the only one that stands with policy and integrity. As for the civil conflict starting in the 1980s which went on for three decades – a movement that had some valid principles (and in a large measure very dictatorial ones too) collapsed in the end due to their inability to negotiate.

Do the voters get the rulers they deserve?

There has been little consideration of the qualifications of their representatives – it would be extremely interesting to have an independent website with educational qualifications of the “Representatives of the People”. In passing, every member of the British cabinet is a graduate of the University – would it not be asking too much to have our representatives an education that at least ended with a full complete secondary education – that is sat and passed a few subjects at the Advanced Level.

So, the highly educated voters of the country have betrayed the free education that they got – they have like the politicians voted with self-interest (what advantage can I get from the candidate?) and with no consideration of national long-term solutions. There is little engagement with the politicians and the rulers after the citizens have done their duty of electing them; there are no checks and balances during that time, but when it comes to the election, the whole lot is shoved out and a new set is rooted in. At least that was the pattern until 1977; did the “Master Manipulator” who broke the mould and manipulated the election as well as the politicians break this pattern and bring upon this country the decades of violence, waste and civility in politics and in life in general. And did this gave rise to the sense of Entitlement; the war has been won and therefore we as the organisers of the effort are entitled to everything that is in the country. Was not the war (carried out and suffered mainly by the village lads) to bring the country back from that nadir for all to benefit from the welfare, education and opportunities that the country and society will provide.

Do we see a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel with the curbing of untrammelled power and some of the checks and balances being brought back. If the price we pay perpetual chaos and three steps forward and two steps backwards? Perhaps so and maybe that is the price of democracy.

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Latest comments

  • 2
    9

    A tourist asked me for a brief of our ethnic problem, what it is all about. I told him majority of Tamil speaking people are living in Sinhala majority areas and the Sinhalese are demanding them to be relocated into North East where the remaining Tamils are settled. I also told him Jaffna is only 20 km away from their home country Tamilnadu where the other 70 million live.

    Soma

    • 6
      1

      Soma,
      Why do you keep parroting ” majority of Tamil speaking people are living in Sinhala majority areas “
      Don’t you know that your womenfolk are running away to Muslim majority areas in Dubai? Is it because they feel safer with the Arabs (and their big p***ks ) than with you?
      The Tamils live in Colombo for the same reason. Don’t pretend you dont know.

      • 3
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        ‘The Tamils live in Colombo for the same reason’

        You mean because they feel safer with the Sinhalese (and their big p***ks ) than with you?

        • 0
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          Paul,
          If you know how to read, you would have understood that the reason being referred to is economics, not big p***ks which of course the Arabs have but the Sinhalese don’t.

          • 0
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            I’m sorry Raman, I thought you knew how to write English, obviously I was wrong.

        • 2
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          Paul

          “You mean because they feel safer with the Sinhalese (and their big p***ks ) than with you?”

          Yes we witnessed it in 1956, 1977, 1983, ………………… and arrested for being Tamils in Colombo by the uniformed ransom Mafia a thriving trade, ethnically cleansed by the single handed Dr Go, …….

      • 1
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        Raman
        “Why do you keep parroting ” majority of Tamil speaking people are living in Sinhala majority areas “
        Just to keep reminding you that you can’t have the cake and eat it too.
        Soma

        • 4
          2

          Mad racist woman , what has Tamil rights have got to do with whether majority of the Tamil speaking people live in Sinhalese majority areas are not. Some of these so called Sinhalese majority areas were not even considered Sinhalese before independence. A very high percentage of people of Welsh and Scottish background do not live in Wales or Scotland , this does not mean the rights of the Welsh and Scottish have to be denied in their own lands. Only Sinhalese racists like you will come up with these sorts of brainless convoluted arguments to deny Tamil people their rights and steal more and more of their lands and make it Sinhalese majority lands until there is no Tamil majority area in the island at all. The was a plan hatched by the Mahaveli department in the 1980s , under the guise of Mahaveli development to settle hundreds of thousands of Sinhalese in Tamil areas and ultimately convert all these areas to Sinhalese majority by even redrawing boundaries of provinces , so that only Tamil majority area will be Jaffna , Killinochchi, northern Mullaitheevu in a vastly reduced northern province. It did not work out but they are again trying this game again. Now racist woman. The majority of Tamil speaking people may live in Sinhalese areas but not the majority of the indigenous Eelam Tamils from the north and east. 70% of them still live in the north and east and only 30% down south and 90% of them in the capital Colombo that was once historically Tamil just like its name. Many indigenous Tamils still live along the west coast. The ones who resisted the forcible Sinhalisation of the 1960s. This area now Sinhalese was Tamil and part of the Jaffna kingdom. Understood racist woman. 90% of the Tamil speaking people living in Sinhalese areas are the Indian origin estate Tamils and the Muslims who have always been there for centuries.

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            Siva S.S.
            “what has Tamil rights have got to do with whether majority of the Tamil speaking people live in Sinhalese majority areas are not.”
            I am trying to figure out a ‘political solution’ which benefits at least 90% of Tamil speaking people in the island. I am unable to come up with a conceptual solution without physical relocation of those in Sinhala majority areas into the envisaged Tamil Homeland. I am trying to convince the Sinhalese that let us agree for a separate homeland for all Tamil speaking people.

            Soma

          • 1
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            Siva S S
            Tamil desire to live in Sinhala majority areas makes me feel proud as a Sinhalese.

            Soma

            • 0
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              Soma,
              “Tamil desire to live in Sinhala majority areas makes me feel proud as a Sinhalese.”
              Yes, and you must be so very proud of your Sinhala womenfolk who prefer to live in Dubai among Muslims.
              Why not try the other line sometimes too, the one about Tamils wanting 2/3 of the coastline, eh?
              Keep parroting.

              • 1
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                Raman
                Tamil desire to live among the SInhalese reflects the inherent superiority of the Sinhala society over the caste ridden hell hole. Go and see for yourself the pathetic life of Tamils in upcountry tea estates. When arrangements were made for them to live among their kith and kin in an environment of their own language, religion and culture in the largest democracy and upcoming superpower they still preferred to live among the SInhalese. To this day they prefer that misarable existence to living in that atom bomb making, rocket sending IT power house. During the war the only ambition of a Tamil mother was to send her children down to a Sinhala area. I have found on this forum that nothing makes a Tamil more uncomfortable than my sugestion related to possible relocation into the envisaged Ealam.

                Soma

                • 0
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                  Somass,
                  “When arrangements were made for them to live among their kith and kin in an environment of their own language, religion and culture in the largest democracy and upcoming superpower”
                  How is it then that 150,000 of them prefer Indian refugee camps to your sacred Sinhala environment? Only baiyas like you would swallow that line.
                  “During the war the only ambition of a Tamil mother was to send her children down to a Sinhala area”
                  If you were being bombed into the stone age, I suppose you wouldn’t budge because the bombs were Sinhala and Buddhist ones.
                  But of course your wife/daughter would run to Dubai, bombs or no bombs.

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              somass

              “Tamil desire to live in Sinhala majority areas makes me feel proud as a Sinhalese.”

              Of course you are, since you have access to a large Tamil population to rob, kill, rape, maim, extort, … and a large number of properties to destroy, ………….
              You ought to be proud of yourself.

              • 1
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                NV
                Yet they still prefer to live among the Sinhalese. Difficult to understand. After the war I expected some movement of Tamils from Colombo to Jaffna. My Wellawatta friend confirms that not a single family has moved back so far. Recently Sumathithran was asked the question if he had any intention of shifting to Jaffna. He retorted ” Why should I?”. If that is the attitude of all Tamils say bye to your Ealam dream. Let me repeat you can’t have the cake and eat it too.

                Soma

        • 2
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          somass

          “Just to keep reminding you that you can’t have the cake and eat it too.”
          -.
          Is that why you went all the way to Jaffna and destroyed the magnificent library with rare books and ola manuscripts.
          You are indeed proud of yourself.

    • 3
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      Soma,

      Don’t be a liar you pussy! Who made this country the sole property of the Sinhalese? And can you tell me why thousands of Sinhalese migrate in search of green grass if you guys are that ‘patriotic’? As for tamils, they had a reason to do so; they had to escape the genocide by Sri Lankan armed forces. Also remember, the sinhala names ‘Dissanayake’, ‘Ratwatte’ and ‘Rajasinghe’ among others are derived from tamil names namely ‘Tissanayagam’, ‘Ravathai’ and ‘Rajasingham’. Can you tell me one tamil name derived from sinhala?

    • 1
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      soma

      It appears the Norwegian Nobel Committee is biased against Ceylonese/Sri lankans since 1901. The committee believes none of the inhabitant of this island is worthy of Nobel Prizes. Even this week the committee has awarded 5 white or yellow people Nobel Prizes for physics and medicine.

      You will have to do something about it.
      Can we not protest against Norwegians in front of their Embassy?
      Do they think the Lankies are so dumb they cannot make head or tail of Sciences?

      How do you and your fellow smart patriots tolerate this injustice?
      Justice Delayed Justice Denied, let’s start right here and right now, ……………..

      What does the super smart patriot Channa Jayasumana think about discrimination on the part of Norwegians? Will he do something about it?

      • 1
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        NV
        They were planning to award it to Sun God. You can still argue that he was not Sri Lankan.

        Soma

        • 0
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          somass

          “They were planning to award it to Sun God.”

          We know on one or two occasions the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to psychopaths, serial killers, war criminals, ………………………………… therefore VP and MR had the right qualifications or entitled for it. Well it not too late Norway Nobel Committee could still consider the surviving sun god for the peace prize.

          I was enquiring about Nobel Prizes for Science not peace nor literature. You have not responded to my concern. Try bit harder.

          By the way like many of those claiming to be Sinhala/Buddhists VP’s grandfather too came from Kerala. VP’s family might have been closely related to you. Why don’t you test your DNA?

  • 6
    3

    Dear Keerthi Weerasooriya,
    .
    What a wonderful article. I’ve been making only comments on the stories of others, but if I had the ability to write an article on my own, this is what I would have written!
    .
    There would have been other problems for me; I’ve never been outside Asia. You, obviously have had wider exposure, but then, it is not for such reasons that I admire your article. It is for the balance and fairness.
    .
    As an individual, you have done all that any of us could have expected. However, praise is also due to the Tamil speaker with whom you had this very long chat. It there are people like the two of you on both sides of the ethnic divide, perhaps there will be hope still for our country.
    .
    I hope some people like Amarasiri or Native Veddah draw attention to this article so that all Sri Lankans will read this.
    .
    Thanks, Keerthi.

  • 1
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    one solution is to abolish provincial councils and have like D.S.senanayakes first cabinet a national govt. at the centre which includes all ethnicities

  • 1
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    Eelam Tamils are united in our quest for eelam. Our leader Thalaivar will always remain our eternal leader. Thalaivar is the pride of every patriotic Eelam Tamils. We follow the teaching of Thalaivar.

    • 1
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      What do you mean ‘the teaching of Thalathel’? He could barely spell his own name and used ‘Dr’ Bala to translate for him.

    • 1
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      I am with you. When will the Tamils (Tamil speaking people irrespective of their religion or the date of arrival scattered across the country ) will be relocated into Ealam?

      Soma

    • 2
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      Eelam Tamil Action Asses committee

      “We follow the teaching of Thalaivar.”

      So he is your Tamil Eelam Buddha.
      What exactly did he teach?

  • 2
    2

    Keerthi Weerasooriya’s article is uneven but worse he attempts to make it appear to be even.
    One agrees with him that League of Nations was a huge failure. But UN is a bigger failure. So is the Crown jewel ‘Democracy’. Discussion will take us outside the permitted number of words.
    .
    Keerthi mocks the “Tamil Genocide” demonstration in Geneva. Genocide has got revalued again and again.
    For example the genocide of E.Pakistan by W.Pakistan was hardly ever mentioned – probably overshadowed by the birth of Bangladesh.
    For well over a decade UN has said that the Rohingyas were the most persecuted people but finally UN agrees that the term genocide is applicable. But no action. Why because Rohingyas are poor and worse they are Muslims.
    .
    Keerthi says that at Geneva, some girls tried to sell him badge (?). He could have said, “No” but instead ,”I am Sinhalese”.
    Keerthi withholds the whole truth maybe unwittingly.
    Keerthi emotively ~ “However later on, no government could stand by when there was advocacy for disembowelment of the country and arms had to be met with arms”.
    How did Keerthi forget But not the really real disembowelments during the pogroms, the regularity, length of time etc etc.?
    Keerthi goes on ~ “………I then brought up the beginning of the armed conflict which was the standardisation for the Advanced Level marks in the 1970s……”.
    Did the pogroms contribute at all Keerthi?
    Keerthi ends “….. three steps forward and two steps backwards?”
    Did you mean “……..two steps forwards and three steps backwards?”.
    .
    Keerthi “The Broken Palmyra” can only be replaced with a seedling – takes 40 years to reach toddy tapping age.
    There is room for lateral thoughts.

  • 1
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    Keerthi,

    Why do you want to look at the issues from Switzerlad,? Why not from the North East,but you are not an impartial observer,but as you yourself admitted-As a Sinhalese, not as a Sri Lankan.

    You are only seeking evidence for your false hypothesis!

    • 1
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      Sri krish
      Why don’t you ask that question your diaspora?

      Soma

      • 3
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        A welcome approach by Keerthi W to understand our complex ethnic problem – despite some callous and insensitive remarks indicative of an unacceptable and negative position suggesting the Sinhala side is flawless. Remember the first instance of known violence was when Sinhala rowdies were let loose – in the presence and behest of activist Buddhist priests present – on unarmed Tamil MP’s at Galle Face in the 1956’s. The much educated Oxonian SWRD was to himself mock the victims in a few hours from this savage attack, in no less a place than the precincts of Parliament, laughing at the wounds of these MPs as “honourable badges of courage” Was it divine justice that he was fated to die violently in 2years time by the same anti-Tamil forces he unleashed? Naturally, the riff raff took it from there countrywide for nearly 4 decades. That is until VP and his men responded in equal measure despite the 85:15% racial ratio. But, verily, that was not a Sinhala-Tamil war although every Tamil in the country from then was made to suffer – in various ways. The final crunch is to insist Tamils have no place in this country!!!

        Yes! As the late Sobita Thero realised, rather belatedly I must add, it is time to look at matters afresh – because a terrible injustice has been done to the Tamil Nation countrywide – as the Ven. Sobita admitted. The debate will be long, heated and not without pain. But it is necessary and will prove useful – hopefully sooner than later.

        Sri Lanka must live and prosper – to the benefit of all her people.
        She must not dis-integrate and die through the narrow toxic venom of communal and religious hate.

        Kettikaran

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          Kettikaran
          As long as the Tamils fight for EQUAL RIGHTS AS EQUAL CITIZENS IN EVERY RESPECT and against any open or hidden discrimination in one one country , one unitary political system similar to some minorities in Western countries and some socialist groups in developing countries I am with the Tamils. We are resisting the attempt to dismember the small island into ethnicity/ religion based small geographical units. No ethnic/ religious group can be allowed to have separate geographical units AND the right to live anywhere. I have repeated thousand times in this column that Tamils(Tamil speaking people) have to choose between separate geographical units OR the right to live anywhere, WHILE BEGGING THEM TO CHOOSE THE LATTER.

          Soma

          • 0
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            Dear Soma

            You know fully well the substance of the 1976 Vattukottai Resolution that specifically called for a Separate State – is no more. This was abandoned by the Tamil political leadership – in consultation with the Tamil Nation – at the behest of India and the international community to pave the way for a negotiated settlement. This was also done to enable GoSL to persuade Sinhala nationalists (the apolitical Buddhist clergy, the uniformed forces etc ) to come down to reason and pragmatism. But Sinhala extremists have, so far, held GoSL at ransom disenabling justice to the Tamil people. The issue has since been to win and lose elections between the two main parties in the Sinhala South. The NEP suffers as a result denied badly needed development and economic progress. Meanwhile, the South has received enormous funds in the past many decades. Look at what Kurunegala was 25 years and today. Compare it with the Jaffna-Vavuniya Districts. It was such obstinacy that ruled Sinhala politics with regard to parity on the language and residue of the Citizenship issues from 1947/48. On both issues (the Citizenship residue issue from 1964) the Buddhist priests and the Sinhala extreme mislead the Sinhala people their religion, people and nation are doomed if they gave in. Shame on all of us it required the arrival of a foreign army (by invitation, by the way) to settle the issue in 1987. You will agree Sinhala Buddhism, people and the Nation have more than survived since then. How long is the country – and, more particularly, the much suffering Tamil Nation going to wait for reason and justice? Let me also add that the army is not going to give in easily. They are enjoying the spoils of war although the war itself was over a decade ago.

            Kettikaran

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            somass
            the biggest bigot in this forum

            ” one unitary political system similar to some minorities in Western countries and some socialist groups in developing countries I am with the Tamils.”

            You love a unitary system don’t you?
            Hence you don’t have to share power, resources, wealth, stolen wealth from the state, needn’t to observe rule of law, free to rape, riot, steal from “others”, unlimited impunity, . …………… when caught invoke Sinhala/Buddhism as legal defense, ………………..

            “No ethnic/ religious group can be allowed to have separate geographical units AND the right to live anywhere.”

            The Sinhala/Buddhist fascists have lost their right to live among the ordinary people in 1956, hence you and your fellow fascists will be forced to relocate to your 10 square mile land of the Sinhala/Buddhist fascists somewhere deep in the South, where you will be free to do whatever you want to do, …………………………
            What my Elders generally learned over the past 70 years is that fascists are not socially equipped with necessary skills to live among people. Therefore we are compelled to isolate and dump you somewhere where you will be comfortable with your like minded morons.
            We are doing you a favour.

            • 1
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              Native, why don’t you prepare a conceptual proposal of a ‘political solution’ for discussion which encompasses at least 90% of Tamils. All proposals presented so far
              including Vaduckodai cover less than 50%. I am baffled as to how those Tamils in Sinhala majority areas are going to be benefited in a federal structure – in fact they will be worse off. Of course
              you will have to start with the TNA definition of TAMIL NATION – that is the toughest part. For your information my definition of “TAMIL NATION” is “ALL TAMIL SPEAKING PEOPLE IRRESPECTIVE OF THEIR RELIGION, CASTE OR THE DATE OF ARRIVAL SCATTERED ACROSS THE ISLAND”
              Does that help?

              Soma

              • 1
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                somass

                The only proposal I have been working on is the 10 Square mile MUTANT HOMELAND GHETTO for the Sinhala/Buddhists fascist noisy minority.
                You will have to share it with Champika, Champa, Wimal Sangili, Dayan, Ganapathipilla, Nalin De Silva, Mervyn Silva, saffron clad thugs, all your single handed war criminals, Champa, Snenal, Shenali Waduge, Channa Masala, Sirisena, …………………………. …. MR, Dr Go the National Hangman, ……………….. crooks, ……………

                Please bear with us, it is taking lot more time than expected.

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            SomAss
            In the first place why were the Tamils deprived of their EQUAL RIGHTS?
            You say “We are resisting the attempts to dismember the small island into ethnicity/religion based small geographical units”.
            So why not restore the EQUAL RIGHTS the Tamils and other minorities were deprieved of, so that they will not fight and can live safe as equals everywhere in SL for the small island to remain intact as a whole.
            That can only be done when a new Constitution is consensual devised and the Presidential system of governance abolished.
            Simple isn’t it?

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          Yes, Kettikaran I’ve heard this story many times.
          .
          We guys has bullied you many times; then, suddenly, we got a thundering slap shock in return. Thereafter , you’ve been able to hold your head high; we’ve been suffering from shock.
          .
          True in many senses; but only you will know how much you have lost of your culture, your tranquil meditations.
          .
          thanks for the kind thoughts, Kettikaran.

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            Dear Sinhala_Man

            If I read you well, sarcasm is not part of your Stock in Trade. That being so I fear you fail to make your point in these your comments. My impression so far is you are a good, decent man trying to understand matters in perspective in this vexed ethnic imbroglio. I have written nothing here to bring offence to you.
            I remain puzzled.

            Kettikaran

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              Dear Kettikaran,
              .
              Now I’m puzzled. You have not offended me in any way.
              .
              I can be sarcastic; but I think it dangerous, since it can be misunderstood.

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              Dear Kettikaran,
              .
              I hope that you see no problem. What I was saying is that, in a sense, we deserved what we got. Only the threat posed by Prabhakaran made us realise our mistake.
              .
              Much better for all of us to be living in peace with one another. Nobody trying to teach letters to others.

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    Sinhalese zealots often repeat the lie that there are more Tamils in the south than north + east. This falsehood is repeated in Goebellsian style hoping the gullible will swallow it in due course. The population of Ceylon Tamils according to 2012 census is as follows:

    North – 987,692 (43.50%)
    East – 609,584 (26.84%)
    Total – 1,597,276 (70.33%)
    7 Provinces – 673,648 (29.66%)
    TOTAL – 2,270,924 (100%)
    The Tamils made a fatal mistake in not demanding Tamil sovereignty they lost to foreign invaders on the battlefield in 1619. On the contrary Kingdom of Kotte was gifted to the Portuguese by King Don Dharmapala in 1597 and the Kandyan Kingdom ceded to the British in 1815 by Kandyan Chiefs in 1815.

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      Thanga
      In respect of a ‘political solution ‘, my definition of “TAMILS” is “ALL TAMIL SPEAKING PEOPLE IRRESPECTIVE OF THEIR RELIGION, CASTE OR THE DATE OF ARRIVAL SCATTERED ACROSS THE ISLAND”
      What is your definition?
      What categories are included /excluded when TNA uses the term “Tamil Nation”?

      Soma

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