15 November, 2019

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The Story Of A Sri Lankan Man’s Lawn

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  • 14
    2

    Brilliant my dear Niranjan, there are many good bits all around us, just like in the Thevaram’s lawn of 2009, we just need to fertilize and water those good bits and slowly but surely weed out the rest, and wait 200 years, and, voila! we have a perfectly democratic, perfectly uncorrupt, perfectly whatever else, island. The additional moral is not to let those Roman emissaries walk all over us!

    • 5
      1

      It is good to see Niranjan’s loving and courageous wish to put growth of weeds under control… But continuation of different kinds of external heinous acts, like the very recent one of releasing wild pets (Leopards) in your loans, may create new types weeds you haven’t seen before.. … This never going to get easier mate…

  • 9
    2

    Great to see that Pol and Sivapuranam Thevaram are back to tease us in to working out the meanting of all this prognosis.
    .
    Well it’s not the lawns of the University Upnawth that concerns us now as the school where “late-developers” from all over the country had to go to catch up on their flirtations with Academe.
    .
    Rains today have also freshened the lawns in the school here; but a wait of 291 years, says you. That’s tough, man. But then, you guys never set us easy tasks, did you?

  • 1
    2

    PReparing nice Grass – LAwn is the british habit. but in North America tghis is outdated. Some people plant vegetables instead. The reason is maintaining the Grass – LAwn is very expensive and time consuming. Instead, if you grow vegetables you save something.

  • 3
    5

    Keep on drinking until your liver stops functioning and you end up with a liver transplant. End of story?

  • 15
    0

    Though the Jaffna University dons suffer from academic malfunction, life is far better for them. They don’t have to work part time in a pub or cut grass.

    • 4
      0

      When will Thevaram Sivapuranam contemplate what will happen to Bridgetown’s University Lawn if some of Jaffna’s University Dons happen to get themselves transplanted there?

  • 3
    3

    I agree with the thrust of your story. Jaffna university can get better and better in the years ahead.
    But people can still expose shenanigans.

    By the way, via the picture, you have now shown that “Bridgetown” is indeed Cambridge. But isn’t Cambridge more than 800 ( not just 300) years old?

    • 2
      0

      It still clings on to several of its archaic practices.

  • 8
    0

    Weeding in Sri Lankan Turfs are very troublesome . Specialy Tamil and Sinhala WEEDS

  • 2
    0

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  • 3
    0

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  • 5
    1

    Has Thevaram given much thought to the possibility that trying to imitate our former colonial masters (who still dominate the thinking of our elite) in nearly every important matter has been our problem.
    The de facto masters of our elitist minds continue to have a hearty laugh at our stupidity.

    • 1
      0

      https://www.facebook.com/146933645364857/videos/1915119471879590/UzpfSTEwMDAwNDIxODYzMjgzODoxMDQzNTU0MjU1Nzk1MTg2/
      Comments by Kambavarithi Jeyaraj- a man who dedicated his life for Thamil and Thamil culture, regarding some issues relevant to contemporary Jaffna.

    • 3
      2

      SJ, here are five cases in which imitating our former colonial masters is a good idea:
      .
      (a) Building public toilets: have you travelled by overnight bus to Jaffna and stopped at Murikandi? You can buy fresh coconuts and break them to get the blessings of God, but you cannot find a clean toilet to pee in. There is a five story building in a university department I know with two toilets marked staff-only. Neither has a working flush. Most public places and university departments in FCM’s place have functioning toilets.
      .
      (b) Internal combustion engines: these things make moving from one place to another convenient. We learnt that from our colonial masters. Should we stop using them and revert back to bullock carts?
      .
      (c) A tradition of research: curiosity driven inquiry and archiving knowledge developed by the pursuit of that inquiry. Should we go back to resident sishyas in guru’s house, doing his laundry and washing his feet?
      .
      (d) Orderly queues: In FCM’s, even if one person is waiting for a bus, that person will stand in an orderly queue of one. Have you seen the 103 but stop at Maradana?
      .
      (e) Universities: FCM’s seem to run universities where junior people can put forward ideas, discuss, debate and disagree with senior staff. Asking a question in those settings is not seen as challenging authority. Here is an incident at one of our faculties. A junior lecturer had just returned from postgraduate work, full of energy and new ideas. At the Faculty Board meeting he spoke up and disagreed with the chair. The response: “you are talking too much — remember just five years ago, I was your teacher!”
      .
      Let’s imitate. The stupidity you refer to is in not doing it well.

      • 1
        0

        Did you know that in Tamilakam the Toilets are maintained and kept clean by a particular caste? All the Periya Dorei went to Colombo and then to UK, USA etc., leaving the lower castes to fight a war, and now there are not enough people to clean the toilets, or carry away the night soil.
        So, we just have enough of the toilet caste people to keep the two Staff Toilets clean.

        In Murikandi you can go behind the Kandi and do the job.

      • 1
        0

        Sorry, I was travelling and could not respond promptly.
        My comments concerned values mainly.
        Opposing colonial values is not endorsing feudal values. In fact, colonialism coexisted well with feudalism, and the transfer of power was to loyalists with semi-feudal backgrounds.
        *
        Our tragedy is that we inherited a system from the Colonial rulers, but have not adapted it to our needs.
        The country is operating on a neo-colonial agenda.
        There are others who have done far better than us by not imitating. Let us learn from them, not imitate them either.
        Opposing colonial values is not endorsing fe=udal values.

        • 0
          0

          SJ: “comments concerned values”
          Examples please.
          .
          “we inherited a system from the Colonial rulers, but have not adapted it”
          In fact the exact opposite is true. Here are two examples: (a) we inherited representative democracy (FPTP), we built on it and designed an even fairer system (PR), but then we (JRJ) adapted it to suit our local taste (or values) by demanding every member of his party signed an undated letter of resignation! (b) we inherited a university system from the colonial masters. we established governance structures within the universities following their model; but in practice, we adapted them to suite our taste (or values) by injecting into them a strongly hierarchical setting which encouraged mediocrity. In such hierarchical setting there is no space for critical thought or new ideas. The sickening anecdote I quote about the dean and the recent returnee is an example of this.
          .
          “There are others who have done far better than us by not imitating.”
          Example please?

          • 1
            0

            S.T.
            What we choose to imitate is a matter of values, much of which have been conditioned by a long colonial rule followed by seven decades of neo-colonial domination.
            *
            Sorry to say that representative democracy as known in the West is not democracy at all in the Third World context. (It is not democracy even in the biggest Western ‘democracy’.)
            The PR system was designed by JRJ, not because it was fair but in order to prevent another government that succeeds his will be denied a steamroller majority that could undo his work.
            We developed an unsustainable elitist university system that was not meant to address our issues. Elitism was there under colonial rule. It exists even in the most liberal academic institutions of the West. A university cannot avoid reflecting the society that it belongs to.
            If at all, my university experience over a long time was one where I got away with a lot as a student and as a junior academic. Most of my colleagues have been open to correction and even criticism by others.
            If there is much critical thought in the West, how do you explain the intellectuals there being taken for a ride by the mainstream media, far more than they did in late-mid 20th Century?
            *
            The Soviet Union and China had to improvise and they did very well.
            Several small countries did well amid imperialist bullying.
            *
            The ailment of some of our intelligentsia is that they suffer the serious illusion that science and scientific thinking are European inventions.

            • 0
              0

              SJ:
              It would help to hear examples of “our values” and “our issues that could not be addressed by the inherited university system”.
              .
              USSR and China are not good examples of those that did well to compare against Sri Lanka, simply because of their size. Europe might have copied scientific thinking from the Arabs, but in the present time, we Sri Lankans have much to learn from Europe (and the West). The Chinese government sends large numbers of students to study in Europe and offer huge incentives to expatriate Chinese academics in European and US universities to return to work in China. They are very explicit about learning the culture (and training the next generation in such culture) than just return and do some work (teach to fish than just give a fish).

  • 4
    2

    Julampitiye Amaraya: Why you forgot to name another “WEED” to that list viz. the MUSLIMS?

  • 4
    4

    Lovely work of fiction…That Sikh drinking 3 beers has been written about an Irishman and so many others in other places. Plagiarism must be admitted for you to make a work of fiction like this by borrowing other people’s work.

  • 8
    6

    PLAGIARISM : the practice of taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as one’s own.

    Not only did you practice it with the “Sikh and 3 Peronis” but it is widely prevalent in Academia in a lot of countries including Motheerrr Yindia Hindustan and Siri Langaa and amongst your Eelam bois in Jaffna Uni too. Why Peronis? Is it it to show you know your Italian beers? if you are in London in a Pub you will probably be gulping a Guiness or Stella Artois. Cheerio Plagiarist.

    • 5
      0

      Ancient Tamil saying: Man plucking hair from egg shell, miss out on omelette!

      • 0
        0

        TT,
        Did ancient Tamils make omelettes?

        • 0
          0

          Yes, they did — from the time stones existed and sand didn’t!

        • 0
          0

          Ha Ha!

        • 0
          0

          TT
          Thanks for that.
          The line cited by you goes further to say that Tamils appeared with a sword at the time.
          Sad that there was no mention of a fork or a frying pan.

  • 5
    6

    What a load of Bologne. You never address a Sinhalese man with his ancestral name. Most Sinhalese nowadays even omit their ancestral names from their full name.

    In this case, the part “Polgahawela Aarachchige” is his ancestral name (different from his surname). Surnames came to SL from the suddhas. In the good old days Sinhalese never used surnames. Always the ancestral name would indicate who and where they are from followed by the given name.

    The given name is what you address a Sinhalese with. In this case, if you addressed him as “Pol” he would have immediately corrected you. But the bottom line is, this is a Fake story. You have also made your Sinhalese “friend” appear as the misfit in your friends circle. Providing his full name you have portrayed him for the whole world to see. What a good friend you are.

    • 5
      2

      Retarded.Shamalee
      Mass Graves unearthed in mannar.
      5 children included.

      • 0
        0

        Condom, the crimes of the Tigers are found everywhere.

  • 3
    0

    Niranjan:
    Justone Singh addressed you “Machaan”. Is this word used in Punjab? Proves the theory that Sinhalese and Tamil had origin in India.

  • 4
    0

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  • 3
    0

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  • 0
    3

    Sivapuranam and Thevaram are two highly venerated books of hindus / Saivaites, as how Christians and Muslims venerate Bible and Quaran respectively. Niranjan denigrates Hindus by having these assumed names instead of giving some other names to his drinking partner. He should stop hurting others including other religious followers, a basic behaviour his teachers or parents would have taught him when he was a child.

    • 1
      0

      I think any religious book does not need veneration instead these bòoks/hymns need to investigated for their authencity, for their relavance in the current political, social and moral conflicts.
      Blind following may lead to serious repecursions. In addition, I always fondly look for these stories to reflect on our society’s ills.
      I thank Prof Mahesan for providing the link for Kambavaarithi’s speech.

  • 3
    0

    Why are people going ballistic about a fictitious but pertinent story? I hope the tourist facilities in Jaffna are improved. I went to Casuarina beach(beautiful beach with Casuarina trees lining the beach). Roads leading to it were all done by the MR regime. So this was in 2010 I think. But there were no developed toilet facilities. There was one dilapidated squatting toilet with a plastic bucket. While squatting pans are good, it should have been improved. And if they are to attract emigrant/expatriate well of Tamil people to return and enjoy life, they need to have real toilets. Now I am told there are superb hotels coming up but this was a tiny observation. Being fat arse, i almost fell into it even though I was so used to using squatting pans in India before I moved to Scarborough and became westernized and sophisticated like white man; so many great things about western culture we can all learn. Cleaning up your own garbage. not leaving trash. Singalams, Mussalamans and Dhamilas are all unclean and their hygiene standards at roadside cafes etc are non-existent. They also need to start using deodorant. I learnt a lot in Canada.

  • 1
    0

    My objection is not to learning from anyone. It is about aping the West and applying solutions to one set of problems to those belonging to another category.
    *
    The trouble with some of the training that we are offered in fishing is that it is in ocean fishery to help us to fish in coastal (or even inland) waters.
    If the purpose is for one to escape from this well to another that is far away, perhaps, there is a point in imitating the West.
    What matters about learning and research is contextual relevance.
    Our problem is that we are a neocolony, and neocolonialism has no answers.

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