22 June, 2024

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Why Liberal Arts Education Is Important For Democracy?

By Saumya Liyanage

Prof. Saumya Liyanage

Dear academics and students of the Agricultural Sciences, University of Sabaragamuwa, thank you for inviting me to deliver this speech on this very special occasion of your educational journey.

Thank you, the Dean and the academic staff of the faculty of Agricultural Sciences, and also Maweesha, who has been enthusiastically communicating with me to bring me here until today. The high competencies in communication skills, attitudes, mindset, and socio-emotional skills she demonstrated during our conversations surely demonstrate the quality of your undergraduate products and the essence of your graduate profile. I would like to thank the academics who have designed the curriculum and other skill development programmes to produce such valuable citizens. On this special occasion, I am thinking of sharing some thoughts about a current crisis that we all face and struggle with. It’s about our education—education in the primary, secondary, and higher education sectors. But the problem that we all face in education is also related to the democracy that we have all maintained and nurtured as citizens of this country for decades. We have not thought that there is an intrinsic connection between the democracy that we sustain in this country and the nature of our education. But when democracy is in question in the contemporary political arena, our education system will also be questioned or vice versa. In recent years, our higher education system has been reinterpreted to produce profit-oriented degree programmes. A new term came into play in our higher education jargon. ‘Entrepreneurial graduate’ was such jargon which promoted job-oriented graduate. Accordingly, our degree programmes were restructured, and new degree programmes were introduced to produce profit-oriented employers. Of course, our curricula should be revised and updated with new tendencies and turns in the higher education sector to fulfil the new requirements of the new world order. But have we thought about what we have done so far? Have we thought about what kind of graduates we produce from our degree programmes? It’s time for us to think about our higher education and the democracy that we continue to sustain in this country. In this important book, Martha C. Nussbaum has clearly shown us the danger that we are heading towards. She exclaims:

Radical changes are occurring in what democratic societies teach the young, and these changes have not been well thought through. Thirsty for national profit, nations and their systems of education are heedlessly discarding skills that are needed to keep democracies alive. If this trend continues, nations all over the world will soon be producing generations of useful machines rather than complete citizens who can think for themselves, criticise tradition, and understand the significance of another person’s sufferings and achievements (Nussbaum 2010, p. 2).

What does she say? As clearly stated in this passage, she is warning us about what is happening in our education, particularly in the social sciences and humanities, and says how we are removing liberal arts education from our education system. Not only that, she further warns us that by doing this, we put our democracy in danger. But at the same time, she shows us what liberal arts education can do: criticising tradition’ and the value of ‘understanding other people’s sufferings and achievements.’ One may wonder, why is it important to criticise tradition? Of course, we should teach our younger generation to question the traditions that we have sustained through the practices of religions, politics, the sciences, the social sciences, the humanities, and so on. Only in this way can we achieve the progress of society by eradicating prejudices and embracing new traditions and norms. As I see it, our democracy is at stake and is already collapsing. So does the higher education. Over the last few years, we have faced numerous issues pertaining to global pandemics and economic crises, both at the global level and within the country. People started demonstrating on the streets, gathering at Galle Face Green to show their disagreements with the regime. However, after one year of aragalaya by the people of the country, our democracy is again weeping and beginning to collapse amidst all the tax cuts and the unbearable living costs. So, how do we survive as universities when the country and the key pillars of democracy are shaking and beginning to lose their credibility? How do we develop competent citizens if democracy is at stake? How do we cultivate graduates when all the value systems in the country are collapsing? At this moment, I would like to ask a serious question. Is there a connection between democracy and education? Is there a connection between democracy and democratic citizenship? Over the past few decades, we have encouraged the circulation of educational mythologies in our higher education system, which has provided us with new hopes for change. For decades in our secondary education, arts disciplines were marginalised and rejected. As a result of this, even some prominent schools in the cities do not offer arts subjects. When the options are limited and narrowed, then the parents are compelled to select what the school offers. The result would be a disaster in a few decades’ time. Most of the private schools and international schools have only science, math, and commerce disciplines. No options for those who are willing to do performing arts, language, history or philosophy. Our world has been enriched and developed through a vast array of disciplines, from human sciences to history, geography, language studies, social sciences, performing arts, agricultural sciences, and so on. We enjoy this life today because of such scholarship, which has given us a fruitful life. Darvin travelled many years around the world to understand human evolution, collecting specimens from various continents. Stephen Hawkin dedicated his life to understand time, black holes, and the universe. Shakespeare wrote plays extensively to explore the human agonies and atrocities. He explored how power works in society at large and how it is infiltrated into the self and transform our subjectivities at the smallest level. Sigmund Freud dedicated his whole life to understanding the inner world of human beings—our dreams, desires, and drives. Mandela fought against apartheid and spent half of his life-giving new meaning to politics, human rights, and equal opportunity. Yual Noah Harrari, the world-famous historian, extensively writes on the future of the human race. In his book Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, he argues:

Unfortunately, the Sapiens regime on earth has so far produced little that we can be proud of. We have mastered our surroundings, increased food production, built cities, established empires, and created far-flung trade networks. But did we decrease the amount of suffering in the world? We are more powerful than ever before, but we have very little idea what to do with all that power. Is there anything more dangerous than dissatisfied and irresponsible gods who don’t know what they want?’ (Harari 2015, pp. 465–466).

With the new world order and the mythologies circulating in our pedagogy, we have begun to eradicate humanities and social sciences, arts, and performing arts studies from our curriculum. We encourage our children to study science and commerce, assuming that this may be the next era of global education. We assume that we need to develop graduates for the global market where they can showcase their English language competency and IT skills to serve the global liberal economies. We think that the next generation is the iGeneration, so we should revise our curriculum to fit our undergraduates into the global iGeneration. Hence, economic prosperity and the accumulation of wealth are the daily mantras of our politicians and policymakers. These hegemonic narratives have surely infiltrated our education system and are being infiltrated into our nervous system as well. Now these teachings are becoming our daily mantras of education, where we try to produce people for the market. As Noam Chomsky argues, this is indoctrination—indoctrination of higher education. My question is: what kind of world do we want our children to live in in the future? Don’t we need to produce Darwins who will understand the evolution of the human race and how humans are changing their metabolism according to the changes taking place in the environment in the next few centuries? Don’t we need more Jane Goodalls who will take care of our closest primates and protect their rights to live as co-sharers of this planet with human beings? Don’t we need more Mandelas who will fight against all the discriminations against humanity and liberate people from being marginalised and tortured because of their race and religion? Don’t we need Shakespeares who will write about human lives in the next millennia and teach us how they would struggle with power and politics with cyborgs? We need humanities and social sciences, arts and performance for all these things. It is not all about profit and economic prosperity. Therefore, the connection between education and democracy is visible and proven. What we try to do in our higher education is cater for the rapid demand for labour, which serves to sustain the liberal economic models in developed nations. There, we do not see Sigmund Freud, Nelson Mandela, Jane Goodall, Yuval Noah Harari, Shakespeare, or Einstein. We need people who can run the businesses for great nations. We produce people who cannot put ‘other people’s shoes on their feet’. In other words, we do not bother to produce students who can see the world through other people’s eyes. In this moment, once again, I remember what Prof. Martha C. Nussbaum argues:

Education for economic growth needs basic skills in literacy and numeracy. It also needs some people to have more advanced skills in computer science and technology. Equal access, however, is not terribly important; a nation can grow very nicely while the rural poor remain illiterate and without basic resources, as recent events in many Indian states show [….] The results of this growth have not trickled down to improve the health and well-being of the rural poor, and there is no reason to think that economic growth requires educating them adequately (Nussbaum 2010, pp. 19–20).

We vaguely assume that when the country is developing with economic prosperity, our education and life will be enriched accordingly. There is no such intrinsic connection between this so-called economic growth and human development. ‘Achievements in health and education, for example, are very poorly correlated with economic growth’(Ibid). Do you think that our policymakers and leaders do follow this line of economic growth? Do you think that for the last few decades, our regimes have taken decisions to develop our country in this direction? Have we achieved such economic growth that it is equivalent to all the people living in this country? I don’t think so. We have chosen to select government universities not because this is the best option we have but, as common people in this country, both students and academics have chosen our government universities because we have no other options. Our parents are not financially stable enough to send us overseas or to a private university. So again, how do we think about connecting our education to the democracy we experience? The economists and political leaders who are commissioned to develop countries through economic prosperity and surplus value tend to reject and remove the arts and humanities from our curriculum. Arts and humanities help people understand history, humankind, cultures, the environment, demography, and so on. The arts reveal human suffering, the courses of suffering, and injustices in society. The most important and unique factor of arts education is that it teaches us to think from another person’s point of view. If I say this in a simple manner, as an actor, this is what I do on stage and on screen. I try to live another person’s life through impersonation. Therefore, the arts and humanities encourage us to cultivate empathy and humanness. So, this so-called economic agenda does not need such people who would think from other people’s perspectives and empathise with others. What they need is to achieve targets and accumulate wealth. So, what we teach today and what democracy needs are two different things. American Philosopher John Dewey, in his ground-breaking book Democracy and Education, argues:

To say that education is a social function, securing direction and development in the immature through their participation in the life of the group to which they belong, is to say in effect that education will vary with the quality of life that prevails in a group (John Dewey 2001, p. 85).

Again, I request you to think about what is happening around you. What is happening with our education? Our responsibilities as academics, parents of this country, and creators of the democracy we experience today are to take responsibility for the next generation and tailor them to face the challenges of the new world in the future. If we sustain this democracy in such a way that economic prosperity becomes the norm of our educational philosophy, then these graduates will not be able to see the world through other people’s eyes. They won’t see the value of other species who share this world with us. They won’t see the value of our existence in this world. They won’t see the value of our environment, which has sustained our lives throughout the history of mankind. They won’t hear the sound of a crying child, the painful cry of a creature caught in a trap, or the chirping of a bird on a tree. They won’t hear the dripping of water in the rain. They won’t hear the inhalation and exhalation of the person sitting next to you.

References 

Dewey J. (2001). Democracy and Education. Pennsylvania State University. 

Harari, Y. N. (2018). Sapiens: a brief history of humankind. New York: Harper Perennial.

Nussbaum, M. C. (2010). Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

*Saumya Liyanage is Professor in Drama and Theatre and is currently working at the Dept. of Theatre, Ballet, and Modern Dance, Faculty of Dance and Drama, University of the Visual and Performing Arts, Colombo, Sri Lanka. saumya.l@vpa.ac.lk

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Latest comments

  • 0
    0

    very sensible and appropriate; obviously a thinking person.

  • 0
    0

    The Prof. in Drama is quite dramatic, when he emphasises, ‘But the problem that we all face in education is also related to the democracy that we have all maintained and nurtured as citizens of this country for decades’.
    Does our Democracy look anything like having been nurtured?!
    I accept that there is a connection – a big connection -, between the democracy that we sustain in this country and the nature of our education.
    Isn’t it the nature of our Education that has left us groping in the dark about Democracy.
    Independent Ceylon began wobbling from the very start.
    From there on, the learned Prof. went on the mend as evinced by, ‘However, after one year of aragalaya by the people of the country, our democracy is again weeping and beginning to collapse’.

    • 3
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      Perhaps, as the Prof says, some city schools and international schools don’t offer Arts subjects. But it is also a fact that many, if not the majority, of rural schools only offer Arts subjects. Since there are more rural schools than city schools, there is a preponderance of Arts students in the output of the campuses. This leads to other problems. These students know that they will never earn as much as, say, computer science students, and they vent their frustrations in ragging and violence. Parents who send their kids to international schools are simply doing the best for their children, in their opinion.
      We do need a certain number of Humanities students, but of better quality, and certainly not a majority.

  • 2
    0

    A necessary minimum of humanities and management course content is insisted upon by Institutions of Engineering.
    But that risks being delivered in the manner of tokenism.
    Engineers need some knowledge of economics, marketing etc. to be able to relate their designs to the realities of life. Interest in social sciences is always an asset. But can that be gained within the walls of a class room?
    Attitude to learning decides the usefulness of anything that one learns.

  • 0
    4

    Not only democracy, but for civilization as a whole. Take away the arts, and the maths and science will lose their significance.

    Art creates the base for STEM. Arts creates the base of commerce and finance. Lankan cultural art-form for example, creates the basis for tourism, hotel industry, restaurant services, entertainment service, apparel industry and so on, creating money generation and job creation. And it cannot be static, using the same age-old cultural concepts. It evolves and enhances with time or it will bore humans, rendering us stagnant.

    In Math and engineering, pure Math concept would serve no purpose if the artistic elements weren’t around to implement the equations into. Indeed, Math equations emerge out of Art…..a simpler and more concentrated representation of the complexity of Art and its abstract forms.

    We as a human and universal species can do without Math and Science. But we’d wither and cease to exist without Art.

    • 1
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      Ramona

      Don’t quite agree with you. In my opinion, SL universities have many useless degree courses which turn out unemployable graduates, who, if ever employed in some capacity, usually in the govt. service, end up as lethargic & indifferent due to their own frustrations. Even in most developed countries, University education is not free but in poverty stricken SL it is, therefore, with the limited funding availableSL Universities should provide a curriculum that nurtures & develop minds to benefit the country economically . In fact, I would say, more funding should be available for schools than for Universities as only a small percentage end up at universities.
      On my first day at Uni, the head of dept. in his welcome speech, reminded us that we ‘read’ for our degree & encouraged us to read widely to broaden our minds. At uni, we learn to manage time, work with others in group studies & in the process, learn about ethics & integrity. Looking at some of the academics who prostitute themselves & even the majority members of the GMOA, I think the university education in SL is, literally, not fir for purpose. In fact, it is the entire education system in SL that needs reforming, not whether humanities, art & literature are important as mathematics & sciences.

      • 0
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        Please pardon a few typing & grammatical errors as my comments got posted accidently before I could correct them but I hope the message I am trying to convey is understood.

        • 0
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          Raj-UK,

          No, not really. This is because all successive GoSL’s have not had the brains to correctly incorporate the Arts students into commerce, industry, and science.

          Present lot only focus on building up Motherland into Dubai, Singapore, Malaysia, and South Korea, thus placing the money of the Hardworking-Suffering-Masses on foreign concreted contracts and objects, and collecting much commission through it.

          Intelligent Job Creation along the right path is the Key. That, together with continuous job-training and work-place restructuring is the way forwards. It will involve money,….a lot of it, but it will be money well spent. Certainly more productive and faster than the 2048 Ranilian drive.

          • 0
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            Ramona

            I think we are both in agreement that SL education system needs overhauling. If I am not mistaken, there are degree courses in Pali & other such subjects, which are not job oriented. I have a British friend who has a Masters in Archelogy & even spent time in SL for his research but found it impossible to find employment after his dept. at some Uni where he was a lecturer in Archelogy, closed down due to lack of funding & interest. He now works as caretaker at a historic site, which is very much a voluntary job. In fact, reading about SL’s own eminent archaeologists in recently discovered historic sites in the north, I was left wondering about the credibility of the Archelogy Dept. Such areas with limited employment potential should fund its own courses, not universities, & that should apply to ‘performing arts’ as well. University funding is limited in SL, therefore, should be utilised on more economics related subjects that would benefit the country.

            Considering that only a few end up at Uni, SL should have a better primary & secondary education. Today, an aspiring mechanic, bricklayer or IT technician, all need to have a basic understanding of physics, mathematics & even, modern materials, to get that job training you speak about. A university education is not a must but a good all round primary & secondary education is.

            Cont

            • 0
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              Cont.
              I am an Engineering graduate with a Masters in Business Administration. I enjoy music & movies but have no interest in musicals or the theatre, nor do I visit art galleries. I took a dislike to literature after having to study Sinhala ‘classics’, Shakespeare & English poetry at school but I enjoy reading. My daughter, on the other hand, likes painting & design with an interest in historic buildings. Accordingly, she became an architect but in her first couple of years at Uni., she was with civil engineering students before specialising in Architecture in her final years. My daughter & I have different interests but our University education was job oriented. SL universities have limited funding, therefore, should be best used to meet the needs of the country.

              • 0
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                Raj-UK,

                Not everyone can do the math or sciences. Those of math or science will revel in the artistic works of others, but the depth of creativity and originality will not be as profound as those with the greater artistic aptitude. Those with greater artistic talents will lose out on contributing their expertise and skills to society. They will still have their artistic potential, but it won’t be contributed in an organized and professional way to country functioning and development. If Sri Lanka loses out on this, we’d be merely incorporating artistic talents and cultures of other countries that give prominence to it, eg. India and America.

                Take e.g. the man in sarong who takes you around historical sites speaking high level Sinhalese with some clear English. His knowledge is through. The level of interest he creates for is amazing. The delve into the local language enhances the experience. However, he is not given the proper channels for bring a tour guide and functions as a private operator with pay dependent on being lucky with customers. Still the dedication is there, and very much appreciated.

                • 0
                  0

                  Pali language gives Sri Lanka its depth of religious persuasion and character, creating wholesome and interesting society….(no, most Pali readers are not racist misfits). And it is a huge foreign revenue earner for tourism.

                  Bricklaying and mechanical work do not need university training, but apprenticeship of which GoSl doesn’t give money for, instead placing it on higher subjects like engineering and sciences that rarely serve the country…..most graduates leaving the country….unless Sri Lanka uses limited monetary resources to force engineering and scientific jobs which will be a huge monetary drain for uncertain outcomes and monetary returns, except for the 2048 drive when we are supposed to look like concreted Dubai and Singapore replete with Robots. How much more productive it will be to use the natural inborn talents of the local man to build up our country and society.

                  • 2
                    0

                    Ntf and other readers,
                    .
                    Those who relied on National Free Education for their university degrees must repay the amount when they leave the country, whether he or she is a doctor, engineer, scientist or anyone else. There should not be any discussions on this. This should be made obligatory since it was the tax payers funded their education.

                    Lawmakers should have introduced law reforms against those who leave the country after finishing their degree programs. The lack of integrity of elected politicians to bring about proper legal reforms is to blame for the mess. They should not allow rely on their pension money because they have not fulfilled their promises to the nation. Lawmakers after getting elected what they have done is nothing but they filled their pockets. Mahinda RAJAPAKSHE is the best example of all criminal in that party. Basta.

                    In Germany, the government provides free education to students, but all funds they receive during their degree programs must be paid back to the government over the next 15 years. Strict law and order enforcement treats everyone equally so no one will be exempted from repayment. Germans pay taxes of 40% or more depending on your job category, whether you are a doctor, researcher, engineer or any other job holder, no one can deny that.

                    • 0
                      0

                      All those doctors currently leaving have probably completed their 15 years of service towards a comparatively more normal former government who collected taxes to educate them.
                      =
                      Ranil’s taxes are not to fund future doctor’s education too much (no,….. current doctors have to work till they are 90).

                      Ranil’s taxes are to fund the billionaire club in the cross-fingered hopes that the billionaires will magically create more billions out of the global economy so some drops can be dripped to the hard-working-worker-ant-class.

                  • 0
                    0

                    Ramona
                    ”Pali language gives Sri Lanka its depth of religious persuasion and character, creating wholesome and interesting society”

                    I don’t know anyone who speakins Pali, which, incidentally, is not related to SL, but I have heard a yob monk, I think from Kurunegala, quoting in Pali that Buddha had preached monks to ‘eat well & live well’. Is that the ”religious persuasion and character, creating wholesome and interesting society” you talk about? How would the knowledge of Pali create a ”huge foreign revenue earner for tourism”? I haven’t come across any Italian tourist guide speaking Latin. As for science graduates leaving the country, its another matter but they still contribute to SL economy by remitting money.

                • 0
                  0

                  Corrections:

                  The level of interest he creates is amazing [the man in sarong].

                  However, he is not given the proper channels for being* a tour guide, and functions as a private operator with pay dependent on being lucky with customers.

                • 0
                  0

                  Ramona
                  I have no idea what you are saying. I have only a passing interest in art, although, I appreciate beauty, & in my profession, mathematics is a core element but my daughter who has a creative interest, also needed mathematics & science included in her curriculum for a broader perspective. Therefore, I would say, in my understanding, it is the opposite of your statement that ‘Math equations emerge out of Art’, In fact, I totally disagree that we ”..can do without Math and Science. But we’d wither and cease to exist without Art”. Beauty alone is not enough in the absence of functionality.
                  Anyway, your point that ”….GoSL’s have not had the brains to correctly incorporate the Arts students into commerce, industry, and science” is my point as well, that our education system, particularly, higher education, should be job oriented & should be beneficial to the country if funded by the tax payer.
                  Cont.

                  • 0
                    0

                    Cont.
                    As for your example of a tour guide, it is up to the tourist board to educate, train & license tour guides. Last time I visited Sigiriya, there were touts masquerading as guides. Maybe your man in a sarong was one of them. I am sure you are aware that in most countries, tour guides are licensed & can only operate at a site they are registered with. Prior to registration, guides have to undergo a course in history relating to that subject. A higher education is not required for this purpose but, in a world technology is increasing exponentially, a person with some mathematics & science knowledge will have wider job prospects, which is why I say that a good ’rounded’ primary & secondary education is necessary & those who have the aptitude for science & numbers can pursue their interests further at University level.

            • 2
              0

              ” If I am not mistaken, there are degree courses in Pali & other such subjects,”
              Are there no such degree courses in the UK? See what I found:
              17 Universities in the UK offering Classical Languages (Latin & Greek) degrees and courses.
              [https://www.hotcoursesabroad.com/study/training-degrees/uk/classical-languages-latin-greek-courses/loc/210/cgory/fn.32-4/sin/ct/programs.html]
              *
              The problem is not what is on offer, but the lack of meaningful options.
              If we produced doctors and engineers instead of graduates in the humanities, we will have a problem of finding jobs for them.
              Doctors will queue in front of houses instead of patients queuing to see doctors.

              • 0
                0

                SJ
                Universities in UK now function as a business. Foreign students bring in huge revenue but the courses on offer depend on demand. Oxford, for example, offers mainly arts, history & literature oriented studies & elite UK public schools very much guarantee a place in Oxford as the demand is less for such courses but an Oxford Degree guarantees a job in media, politics or the civil service. However, entry to Oxford is very much reserved for the ‘upper class’. Boris J, Cameron & most Tory politicians are Oxford graduates who read history or literature but it is the ‘experience’ that counts more than the academic content. Teaching is one to one with a personal tutor & all meals must be had in the dining hall, dressed ‘appropriately. It is the ‘social etiquette’, public speaking coaching & the perceived ‘leadership’ qualities gained in the process that are considered necessary in high positions & is expected from Oxford graduates, guaranteeing the seat on the Board of Directors or a high position in the civil service. For many wealthy parents, particularly, foreigners, it is the prestige of a British Degree that matters & are willing to pay high fees. For those not so privileged, it is a competitive job market to get a foot hold on the career ladder.

      • 1
        0

        Raj,
        The solution might be to have “major” and “minor” degrees as in some countries. Say IT with Mandarin, or Physics with Sociology.

        • 2
          0

          They call it bridge courses today: I think the time went by, and only majors were based on those majors. I got to know the engineering student in some countries in Africa, have to learn general biology and logics too before they complete their basic degress.
          :
          Nowadays Basic degrees are expanded as follows in european universities.

          Biology – Human Biology, Animal Biology, Marine Biology, Botany, Forest Biology etc
          Chemistry – General Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Clinical Chemistry, Biopharmacology, Food chemistry and toxicology
          Physics – General Physics, Biophysics, Radiation Physics, Astrophysics.
          Engineering – Biomedical Engineering, Medical Engineering and General Electrical, Mechanical and Civil Engineering
          Informatics – Bioinformatics, Medical Informatics etc.
          :
          There is physics but also biophysics, radiation physics, medical physics as majors etc.
          They call the category “NUMERUS CLAUSUS” and every uni offer all these subjects
          .

          • 0
            0

            Typo – NOT every Uni offer all these subjects.

        • 0
          0

          oc
          Not so loud.
          They may do it.

  • 1
    0

    It is a great and interesting article that should attract people of all
    walks of life and put their maximum efforts to find a meaningful
    way out . For my part , I spent a couple of hours doing some web
    search and found some interesting solutions from Australia and
    UK . Let us look at what Australia is doing to handle the situation .

    There are double and combined degrees already on offer . The
    Australian National University claims that their new flexible
    degrees improve graduate employability in a way that ” suits your
    head and heart ” . Students complete any two degrees in 4 years
    from arts , social sciences , business or science . The University of
    Sydney offers a similar option with a 4 year Bachelor of Science
    And Arts . And on top of that it also offers a new degree designed
    to promote transdisciplinarity . The three year Bachelor of Liberal
    Arts and Science . The idea behind seem to be ” After all , while
    few would doubt the value of disciplined thinking , isn’t our goal
    also to prepare students for life long learning in an undisciplined
    world ” ?

    Unfortunately the trouble we are having with our education is ,
    like in everything else , Greedy , Crooked , Evil and Jealous
    politics and Boot Licking Public and Private Sector that are a
    hindrance to real development . Nothing , virtually nothing is
    being done with prosperity of the county in mind and how do
    you then expect results other than Failure that leads to
    Bankruptcy ? Can such a country make real changes that cost
    more funding than fund cuts ? Before anything else , the
    County Needs Real People Who Want a Life and Not People Who
    Want Outsiders To Give A Life to them On A Silver Tray . Not
    People , Rats .

    • 3
      0

      The cleverest thing that Australian universities do is selling degrees to unsuspecting Asians.

  • 0
    0

    Our accountants started to add MBA to their CIMA and ACCA about 25 years
    back as job competition was getting tough . Like engineering and medical of
    today , it was accountancy and business management about 50 years back .
    The difference between now and then was , this was not a Race and the
    majority of them were urban based , unlike today . The min issue today is ,
    whether fit or unfit , all are after becoming an IDOL , GODLY or MONEY
    SPINNER . Already about 25 years back , in developed countries , something
    called shared – jobs came into being . Nothing , Nobody , Nowhere is ,
    guaranteed a full time permanent . Everything everywhere started to change
    as far as jobs are concerned . Some are doing about three different kinds of
    jobs a day to stay employed . We are not doing anything in the right direction
    and that is our curse .

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