1 December, 2020

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A Culture Of Distortion: What The Eighties Bred

By Uditha Devapriya

Uditha Devapriya

Regi Siriwardena was probably the greatest English prose stylist this country bred, but over the years I’ve come to remember him less as a writer and poet than as an incisive yet flawed commentator.

Writing to the Lanka Guardian in March 1979, for instance, he argued that the Buddhist clergy in this country was devoid of the kind of radicalism which had been nurtured by the Protestant clergy in the 19th century and the Catholic clergy in the 20th. His essay, superficial at one level, was nevertheless convincing, so convincing that it compelled Professor Kumari Jayawardena to pen a four-part rejoinder

Jayawardena’s point was as cogent as Regi’s was reductionist: that throughout history, and not just that of the Buddhist clergy, revolts and rebellions led by the institutions of the status quo have congealed into reactionary movements, which explains the later retrogression of the Buddhist revival to its contemporary chauvinist character. While it’s difficult to take sides and understand which “reply” was historically accurate, I prefer Professor Jayawardena’s contention, because it was backed by research.

Now to my point.

Somewhere in the 1970s there was a paradigm shift in the social sciences, particularly in postcolonial societies. The late S. B. D. de Silva probably had this in mind when he wrote in 1982 that “[r]esearch in the social sciences in underdeveloped countries has, of late, metamorphosed into a variety of big business.” This is the point that Susantha Goonatilake brought out in his seminal work Recolonisation, which as one perceptive reader told me was more a compilation than a work of sociology; Goonatilake’s book indicts almost everyone, from the usual suspects like Charles and Sunila Abeysekara to Marxist stalwarts like Leslie Goonewardena to otherwise ideologically different individuals like Siriwardena and Jayawardena.

How did the social sciences transform into a variety of big business? Goonatilake addresses this question in his work, viewing civil society and good governance as concepts that were used as part of the Western development discourse to further the political control of the Global North over the Global South, stemming from the end of the Cold War and the belief that its end vindicated a market-led approach to not just the economy but civil society as well. Agencies in both the West and the East were heavily dependent, in this scheme of things, on the individual donor, though “the dependency of southern NGOs [was] much higher.” One result of this network of dependency was an “arms bazaar” which led to NGOs in general, regardless of the country of origin, “becoming the implementers of donor policies.”

It is in this context that the “paradigm shift” of the social sciences referred to before must be viewed. At a time when everyone and anyone supporting the moves for a new Constitution and the movement for devolution and the speedy implementation of the 13th Amendment are seen as NGO nadayo, it makes sense to revisit how and why this shift affected not just the politics but also the culture of this country.

In this regard, what Professor de Silva said in 1982 is pertinent:

Institutes and research agencies flourish in rich profusion, with virtually a business interest in staging seminars, symposia and workshops and in sponsoring publications. In contrast, concerned activity committed to exposing the real roots of social disarray is, remarkably, absent. Work and leisure are sharply demarcated, with work being restricted to the conventional workplace with its prescribed regimen of working hours. In a landscape that is intellectually sparse and monotonous, any contribution to, or contact with scientific effort becomes magnified. In such a wasteland collaboration including scrutiny and comments on work in progress is hard to get, especially when not directly related to one’s professional commitments.

Since I can comment with any sort of authority and interest on the arts, it’s interesting to note how this wave of institutes, research agencies, and sponsoring publications distorted, if not refracted or reflected in a crude way, the culture of this country and the history of that culture. And since Recolonisation takes on the academics and NGO intellectuals who made distortion a veritable “business interest”, I won’t quote specific examples, except to make one point: that not until the late seventies and early eighties did we witness an onset of pronouncements on cultural matters by critics which were, for the lack of a better way of putting it, wholly reductionist and inaccurate.

One legacy of the “privatisation” of the social sciences in the 70s and 80s was the demonization of that most vilified of all national figures, Anagarika Dharmapala. As I argued in this column a few months ago, scholars tend to separate the revivalist from the nationalist in the man to such an extent that every quote attributed to him has been taken apart, dissected, added to, and listed out as evidence of his racism, xenophobia, misogyny, classism, and stunted sexuality.

For instance when Siriwardena, in an article in the Lanka Guardian (“Anagarika Dharmapala: Marxist or Racist?”, August 1980), argued that the man’s references to the “people of the soil” excluded all but the Sinhalese Buddhists from his revivalist program, Professor Ralph Pieris in a more comprehensively researched essay (“The Enigma of Anagarika”, August 1980) contended that “in terms of unanalysed general categories such as ‘race’”, it was futile to analyse what the man said or wrote. 

Personally I feel that both statements were reductionist, but Professor Pieris’s idea of Dharmapala as a figure “bristling with contradictions” seems to me sounder, though over the years it has been Siriwardena’s image of the man as a propagator of the “Aryan racial myth” that has persisted. In that sense, laudable as his book is, Sarath Amunugama’s extensive treatment on Dharmapala fails to address the many things misattributed to him; it dwells at length on the man as the cultural revivalist, because of course that’s what every work that does not wish to dissect a controversial figure tends to go into: his or her contributions to culture, as opposed to society.

But then it wasn’t just the origins of the Sri Lankan people, the radicalism or the absence of it in the Buddhist clergy, and the racialism at the heart of Anagarika Dharmapala’s polemics which were distorted and then refracted during the 80s by social scientists in the pay of the dollar-pound NGO mafia. And it wasn’t just Regi Siriwardena or Kumari Jayawardena or Ralph Pieris who were/got enmeshed in the ideological disputes and distortions these social scientists propagated. There were other topics and there were other personalities.

What matters here is not what those topics or who those personalities were, but what the distortions they sustained have led us, as a country still reeling from colonialism, to at present. It has been something of a convenient truth to resort to that politicians have contributed to our fragmented polity. But then, we can ask, what is polity but society, and what is society but a mishmash of politicians and non-politicians: artists, scientists, businessmen, ideologues, sociologists?

In this sense, the distortions made by the social scientists during the NGO wave of the 80s have contributed as much to that fragmented polity as the politicians, if not more than them. So successful has this culture of distortion been, moreover, that those from outside who write on our culture, history, and arts cave in inadvertently to the many simplifications made by these scientists.

To give just one example, in 2009 a man called Robert Kaplan wrote a long article on Sri Lanka in The Atlantic. He titled it “Buddha’s Savage Peace” and argued, inter alia, that the 30 year civil conflict was one between Sinhalese Buddhists and Hindu Tamils, bringing down the war to a mere religious crisis.

This reduction of the conflict into one between Buddhists and Hindus simplified what was really a complex reality: the conflict between Buddhists and Tamil Christians, the caste disputes between Hindu and Christian Tamils, and the prevalence of chauvinism among Sinhalese Christians. The animus of the Sinhalese Buddhists against the Hindu Tamils is, though not certainly a myth, a convenient simplification, and although I’m not sure where Kaplan picked it up from, I am certain that it was a result of the culture of reductionism the privatisation of the social sciences had facilitated decades before. It’s not too late in this respect, I feel, to write another Recolonisation, and it’s not too late to call out on the people behind this wave of reductionism. Right now.

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Latest comments

  • 12
    6

    Uditha, you have become an aimless keyboard masturbator.

    • 9
      3

      This Young boy – an another condom supporter of Dayan Jayathilaka has not yet sensed it. It was not only 80ties, but RAJAPAKSHE rascals and their abusive politics took us to all ends by todday.
      :
      Today RASCALS rally round to support Rajapakshes even if their lovely ones would have been attacked or even raped on broad day light by Rajanos. :
      :
      People behaves as if they have no brains, I mean majority.
      :
      They have no brains to think twice, but to waging the tale to the tune of Rajapakshe racals.
      :
      Not many would raise the question, as to why THEIR TAX FUNDs be part of the HELICOPTER bills of BALLIGE putha Rajakashe.
      .
      The country and nation are taken to all abusive levels by the media, which MAJORLY work twisting it but in favour of RAJAKSHES.
      .
      Lanken CRISIS was made by LOCAL media MUADALIES for their selfish gains. Behind them Rajapashe black money men – and DRUG dealers as reliable sources report it.
      :
      Yet today those DRUG traffickers roam in the city behind RAJAKSHES, they feel if notorious Rajakshes are free, why not the big drug traffickers of NIMAL lanza nature be PUT IN jail.

      • 9
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        I didn’t read the piece; I don’t have the time nor the inclination …….. and I don’t know and care to know the various players mentioned.

        In the limited time we have on this earth we don’t have enough time to change the world …….. only barely enough time to change ourselves ……….. sooooooo to me intellectual honesty/sincerity – more simply, honesty of thought – is very important.

        It’s sad to see the young writer Uditha, at 24, has started going the way of the other Lankan “writers” Dayan, Malinda et al ……. using all the tools in a writer’s kitbag to project upon the world not the truth but the biased jaundiced view that resides in their minds they perhaps picked up from their childhood. …………. Many Lankans are ever incapable of changing their minds; child makes the adult.

        Sarath, Shyamon, ……….. and many other writers, although not perfect, try to base their writing – in the main – on the truth of the prevailing situation/situations ………. while many others give a distorted/calculated view for some personal advantage.

        The Lankan young look to our elders for heroes/exemplary-humans ………. and the tragedy is they can find only a handful; perhaps none.

        If an aspiring 15 year old writer looks up to Uditha what does he find? A biased writer ……….. The same way when Uditha looks up to Dayan, Milinda et al ……. he finds bull-shitters …….. and takes after them ……. it’s a vicious circle.

        I read a book when I was perhaps 12/13 (sure, the child made the man) ………. and since then luckily for me my hero has been not a real person but a character in a novel; Meursault.

        The afterword by the author,

      • 10
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        continued

        A long time ago, I summed up The Outsider in a sentence I realise is extremely paradoxical: `In our society any man who doesn’t cry at his mother’s funeral is liable to be condemned to death.’ I simply meant that the hero of the book is condemned because he doesn’t play the game. In this sense, he is an outsider to the society in which he lives, wandering on the fringe, on the outskirts of life, solitary and sensual. And for that reason, some readers have been tempted to regard him as a reject. But to get a more accurate picture of his character, or rather one which conforms more closely to his author’s intentions, you must ask yourself in what way Meursault doesn’t play the game. The answer is simple: he refuses to lie. Lying is not saying what isn’t true. It is also, in fact, especially saying more than is true and, in case of the human heart, saying more than one feels. We all do it, every day, to make life simpler. But, contrary to appearances, Meursault doesn’t want to make life simpler. He says what he is, he refuses to hide his feelings and society immediately feels threatened. For example, he is asked to say that he regrets his crime, in time-honoured fashion. He replies that he feels more annoyance about it than true regret. And it is this nuance that condemns him.

      • 9
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        continued

        So for me Meursault is not a reject, but a poor and naked man, in love with a sun which leaves no shadows. Far from lacking all sensibility, he is driven by a tenacious and therefore profound passion, the passion for an absolute and for truth. The truth is as yet a negative one, a truth born of living and feeling, but without which no triumph over the self or over the world will ever be possible.
        So one wouldn’t be far wrong in seeing The Outsider as the story of a man who, without any heroic pretensions, agrees to die for the truth. I also once said, and again paradoxically, that I tried to make my character represent the only Christ that we deserve. It will be understood, after these explanations, that I said it without any intention of blasphemy but simply with the somewhat ironic affection that an artist has a right to feel towards the characters he has created.
        —Albert Camus: Preface to the American University Edition of The Outsider, January 1955

    • 1
      1

      In Tamil ‘Anagarika Dharmapala’ is pronunced and called as ‘ ANAAGARIIKA dharmapala’ mean ‘ UNCIVILIZED dharmapala”’ He was BuduRacist and FACIST sinkeleaya

      • 3
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        ceylonee

        How about his Tamil predecessor Arumuga Navalar, a savaite exclusionist casteist? Don’t you think he was also should be considered Anagarikam?

  • 14
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    This is guy is as bad as Dr Dayan Jayatillke…..lots of name dropping, convoluted sentences … meaningless comparisons…meaningless quotes… unstructured flow….and flawed arguments

  • 10
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    Head aches with embarrassment!

    Stop this foolary, some one.

  • 11
    2

    CT
    Thank you for publishing this boy wonder’s long typing.
    The boy wonder has provided us with opportunity to learn and enrich our vocabulary.

    However he types:
    “To give just one example, in 2009 a man called Robert Kaplan wrote a long article on Sri Lanka in The Atlantic. He titled it “Buddha’s Savage Peace” and argued, inter alia, that the 30 year civil conflict was one between Sinhalese Buddhists and Hindu Tamils, bringing down the war to a mere religious crisis.”

    Definitely Kaplan was wrong. The war has gone on for more than 100 years, it was essentially a war between Sinhala/Buddhist mutants against rest of the people, 1915, 1958, 1971, 1977, 1983, 1987/1991, … …… Anagarika Homeless Dharmapala’s children and grandchildren started it but continued to this day, through various facets of this island’s history, … conflict is essentially among the Sinhala/Buddhist mutants themselves, however it continued to spill over to other major sections of the innocent people, … The Sinhalese were up in arms twice, Tamils tried over 30 years, …. Homeless Dharmapala’s desire to transform this country into a saffron fascist state …. has taken a toll, …. among all people, great deal of life, … .

    The serious war/conflict is between one set of Sinhala/Buddhist mutants and another set of Sinhala/Buddhist mutants. It will continue through, Sinha Le, token Gestures or cosmetic changes towards Buddhism (declaration of ‘Thripitakaya’ as a national heritage of Sri Lanka), giving Buddhism (Sinhala/Buddhism the foremost place in the constitution) …………… In that process many Sinhala/Buddhist mutants have become rich and powerful.

    somass, Dayan, Windbag Weerawansa, Udhaya, ………… are trying their best to be part of the Mutant fascist homeland.

    Kaplan was/is wrong.

    • 3
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      Native Veddha; I think the problem goes back to Vihara Maha Devi. Embarrassed with her no so good looking husband, who saved her from an embarrassment, she set her child – nay brainwashed the child – against the Tamils as represented by Elara.The brainwashed son met the mother’s demand and either stabbed, throttled or poisoned Elara.
      This had been stylized by the Buddhist monks through ages and we now have this Tamil phobia.

  • 7
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    The contradictions highlighted by you in the final paragraphs are very true. Even though we identify with various ethno-religious labels at the core we all have a shared culture. Any Sinhalese Buddhist is also a hindu and most hindus worship the Buddha as well. We all, along with muslims, go and worship Virgin Mary at various shrines.
    Most outsiders who do not have a good idea of our culture try to categorize us in order to understand the differences, but end up confusing themselves and their compatriots.
    The other point you made about the commercialization and exploitation of the NGOs by wealthy countries is accurate. Read the January-February issue of the American magazine “Foreign Affairs”, and you will find some articles with great insight as to how the NGO/civil society crowd in poor countries were used as tools in the COld War and beyond, as well as to buttress the world order established by the US after WWII. The latter is often called “Pax Americana” (echoing the pax romana). The US was largely successful in its efforts to control the world, and keep capitalism thriving by using diplomatic and covert military pressure to get poor countries and europeans in check, by incentivicing cooperation as opposed to confrontation.
    But now after the collapse of the US hegemony (brought about by China and an increasingly strident post-soviet Russia), the rules of the game are changing. It is a dangerous time, since there are multiple bullies in the play ground (as opposed to only one).
    A third point: the strategy of using “civil society” groups – funded mainly by western governments – had bred several generations of fake “do-gooders” in poor countries. They are primarily from the elite classes, which have very little in common with the majority of people living in these countries. A good example is out own Radhika Coomaraswamy.

  • 6
    1

    All religious priests/Monks/Cardinals/ Bishops need a Council (like the SL Medical Council) to take disciplinary actions when they do/say things that are unworthy of them

    • 3
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      Naman; How right you are. There will lie our salvation as a nation.

  • 2
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    A good, valuable piece Uditha, but I think you’ve been unfair by Regi Siriwardena. He responded to Prof Kumari J’s four part essay by observing that she had missed or evaded his main point. He went on to describe her as ” erudite but not analytical”.

    His point was not that the Buddhist clergy had not joined or been at the head of revolts and progressive causes, which was the point that Kumari had proved. It was that unlike — repeatedly–in the Christian case, these interventions had not led to the reinterpretation of the doctrine itself in radical terms (examples ranging from Martin Luther, through Munzer, the Levellers and Diggers, up to Liberation Theology).

    So, from Regi’s point of view, Kumari had set up a straw man and flogged it.

    Now this does not mean Regi was right and Kumari wrong, but we must not misunderstand, still less distort, Regi’s case.

    • 6
      1

      And what about you DJ, you have been unfair by Rajapakshe mantra . but hope you will sense it let alone this year.

  • 1
    9

    Great Article Uditha. Keep writing.

    As for Robert Kaplan, the lesser said about his the better it is. A former member of the Israeli military that shoots at innocent Palestinians on a daily basis and a supporter of the illegal occupation of Iraq, when did this scoundrel become an expert on Sri Lankan matters.

    Sri Lanka is OUR country and we can persecute whoever we the majoritarians like. It’s none of his business.

    This is the scoundrel who continuously harps that imperialism is good for humanity. This is the kind of Jew that Hitler the great would have been blamed for failing to eradicate.

    • 8
      0

      Retarded ……………. Shameless women sniffing Perera

      “A former member of the Israeli military that shoots at innocent Palestinians on a daily basis”

      So there isn’t much difference between Israeli armed forces and Sri Lankan ones, is there?

      ” and a supporter of the illegal occupation of Iraq, when did this scoundrel become an expert on Sri Lankan matters.”

      If war monger war crime denier and public racist could claim being an expert on backstop, pivot, rebalancing, cuban cigar, ….. and other millions of things why not Kaplan?

      “Sri Lanka is OUR country and we can persecute whoever we the majoritarians like.”

      True, bein the majoritarian you have more stupid people than res of the “OTHERS” put together. By the which one is your country? South India perhaps, or Bangladesh.

      “This is the kind of Jew that Hitler the great would have been blamed for failing to eradicate.”

      Apologise and withdraw the above otherwise you are going to be in trouble. You are free to remain a stupid however there is limit to how stupid you want to be. If you can’t decide the limit for yourself someone else will decide it for you.

      • 1
        8

        To threaten a former Army veteran, a Father of 2 and a Grand Father of 5, a successful Fund Manager and a distinguished citizen of both Canada and Sri Lanka, who does this monkey thinks he is?

        I wish, I certainly wish this monkey could make this demand to my face, in person.

        • 7
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          Native Vedda

          “I wish, I certainly wish this monkey could make this demand to my face, in person.”

          If you want to meet a monkey urgently go visit the parliament in Kotte or Dehiwala Zoo or look in the mirror.

          If you want to meet a human being please make an appointment.

  • 0
    0

    I googled Rober Kaplan and was directed to Dr Robert Kaplan and his Balance Score Card….may be Google is good at using AI and machine learning.

  • 5
    0

    Uditha Putha’s convoluted Route to Kaplan….

    Regi Siriwardena —>Kumari Jayawardena—>The late S. B. D. de Silva—->Susantha Goonatilake———->Charles and Sunila Abeysekara—–>Anagarika Dharmapala—->Professor Ralph Pieris —>Sarath Amunugama’s—> Robert Kaplan

  • 6
    0

    This “Buddhist Clergy” syndrome appeared most significantly, in “Politics” in 1956 with the formation of “Pancha Maha Bala Vegaya” with “Sanga”, “Veda”, “Guru”, “Govi”, “Kamkarau”. The most “PROMINENT” and “FORCEFUL” figure in that “Bala Vegaya” was the Buddhist Clergy , Rev. Buddharakkhita of Kelaniya Raja Maha Vehare. In the FINAL stage of “Performance” of this “Bala Vegaya”, this “Buddhist Clergy” Rev.Buddharakkitha , planned and “Killed” the very head of it – Late Mr. S.W.R.D. Bandaranaike. Why, he did it? The answer not “spoken” or “heard” is:- This “Clergy” asked for the blessings of the Leader (SWRDB) to “Operate” a Shipping Co. which at that time was a “Thriving Business”. But SWRDB flatly refused and NATIONALIZED the whole business and handed it over to a Govt. Corporation formed for the purpose named “Shipping Corporation”. That was enough “INSULT” to Rev.Buddharakkitha and from there onwards “SWRDB’S” future was sealed. This I narrated to show how this “Buddhist Clergy” “Syndrome” works in Politics in this country. Since then (from 1958) to date “Buddhist Clergy” has become a “Sharpened Tool” to capture power. Now we SEE even the “Muslim Clergy” very surreptitiously roped into the mellifluous melodic performances of the Crooked Politicians and their parties. The “Religion” and “Clergy” have been “Made” and become a “Blessed Tool” to capture power. It will continue until the PEOPLE get AWAKENED. When? Sorry NO CLUE to answer that.

    • 4
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      Douglas

      “But SWRDB flatly refused and NATIONALIZED the whole business and handed it over to a Govt. Corporation formed for the purpose named “Shipping Corporation”.

      The ports were nationalised in 1958 and brought under Port Authority, the present Sri Lanka Ports Authority (SLPA) was formed in the late 1970s took over the earlier Port Authority.

      The Ceylon Shipping Corporation Ltd was founded in 1969. There is no evidence of ship owning Sri Lanka state authority.

      However the dispute between the saffron clad businessman and S W R D Banda existed for real.
      Please fact check with your bakery uncle.

  • 4
    0

    For a supposed to be 24 yrs old Uditha displays precocious brilliance and excellent prose. As the years pass and with exposure to mature writing of historians, analysts, comments and so on, the lad will find his intellectual balance and morality. I have had the chance to read him in CT and other Lankan journals and am relieved there still remain good potential of the educated in Sri Lanka writing in English. He writes well, presents his points cogently. I believe he cannot be accused of narrow nationalism or racism – an environment that has devoured many of our talented young in the Sinhala side of the present generation.
    It is in such minds that a future multi-racial and multi-religious liberal Lankan society may hopefully evolve.

    Don’t be too hard on the NGOs, Uditha. Some of the, more prominent ones are doing a good and useful job in the search of our unity. Of course, there may be a few bad ones too. I hope you have the courage to censure the egregious elements in the
    influential Buddhist clerical side. For it is they who have the power to make or break
    governments in this unfortunately divided land in the past few decades. I hope you will forgive me when I say this is verily not their task. The intrusion of the Buddhist clergy into our political landscape only produces the wrong kind of leaders – a surfeit of which has ruined this country, divided it to levels so grotesque.

    R. Varathan

    • 1
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      R. Varathan
      “It is in such minds that a future multi-racial and multi-religious liberal Lankan society may hopefully evolve.”

      Agreed Varathan. The Sinhala and Tamil Educated Sri Lankans, cannot dig themselves out of the Hole that Bandaranaike’s ‘Sinhala Only and Tamil Also’ Policy, dropped them in!
      Why is that? Because They have no access to the New Ideas Originating in the Rest of the World. They are confined to Sinhala and Tamil Language Newspapers and Other Local Media!
      Foreign Language Media such as the Internet, are a closed Book, and Our Sinhala and Tamil Educated Politicians take Full Advantage of this Fact, to gull the Sri Lankan Voters!
      Even Sinhala Buddhism has come under Their Spell!

  • 4
    0

    Native Vedda: Thanks and you are correct. What I really meant was the “Business” in the Port, that Rev. Mapitigama Buddharakkitha wanted to “Monopolize” by setting up a “Company” of his “OWN”. That is how the “Port (Cargo) Corporation” came into being in 1958, thus Nationalizing the Colombo Port.

    • 3
      0

      Douglas

      Fine
      Have a good day.

  • 5
    0

    It needs intelligence and less ego to realize how limited you are . Not everyone who has something to say . Better not write at all. Reggi Siriwardena superficial ?

    • 0
      0

      KOLLA: HE is writing how the protestants tried to Frame Buddhists. Bhikkus know far more than that

  • 5
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    Reggie S, was never a bard but a leftist political activist who ( to his credit) pioneered the the Civil Rights Movement of Sri Lanka, a non-governmental organization for human rights in the early 1970s.

    Whilst I salute him as a former College-mate of STC, yet he need not be risen to the levels of esteem as highlighted by U Devapriy, since there were many Thomians of that Era that deserve better recognition.

    Whist lavishing in English words that are seldom used in a journalistic document, I need to better focus on the the point that some English words mean far beyond the official Oxford / Cambridge or McMillan dictionaries.

  • 9
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    The author reminds me of Aesop’s cat which was made into a princess by a fairy.
    The princess when she saw a mouse in her bedroom ran after the mouse.
    Some pretenses are hard to maintain.

  • 2
    0

    Native Veddha; I think the problem goes back to Vihara Maha Devi. Embarrassed with her no so good looking husband, who saved her from an embarrassment, she set her child – nay brainwashed the child – against the Tamils as represented by Elara.The brainwashed son met the mother’s demand and either stabbed, throttled or poisoned Elara.
    This had been stylized by the Buddhist monks through ages and we now have this Tamil phobia.

  • 2
    0

    Uditha, the only interesting thing about this piece is its caption : the whole article is a load of convoluted rubbish and shit which has nothing to do with the title. Stop writing this crap you thick skinned upstart! Read the readers comments and learn.
    Jayalath

    • 3
      0

      Jayalath

      We should not stop anyone writing especially the youth.
      Give him some time.

      “The infinite monkey theorem:
      The infinite monkey theorem states that a monkey hitting keys at random on a typewriter keyboard for an infinite amount of time will almost surely type any given text, such as the complete works of William Shakespeare.”

      If monkey could Uditha definitely could.

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