19 November, 2019

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Chandrika BBS Target For Championing Religious Freedom; Gnanasara Claims Jailani Sufi Prophet Was A Marijuana-Smoking Hunter

The hardline Sinhala Buddhist movement the Bodu Bala Sena has slammed former President Chandrika Kumaratunga in the most disparaging terms, for daring to espouse the cause of religious harmony in the country, after a year of vicious attacks against minority Muslim, Christian and Hindu communities in the island, spurred on by hate speech by BBS and like minded organisations.

Gnanasara

Gnanasara

BBS General Secretary Galagodaththe Gnanasara who recently met Burma’s hardline monk Wirathu, referred to the former Head of State as a “Moda Ammandi” (Foolish dame), a “hollow woman” and said her campaign against Buddhists in Sri Lanka was not unlike the title of a semi-pornographical Sinhalese movie.

“That was called Agey Wairaya, this is Chandrika’s Wairaya (Chandika’s revenge),” the monk charged at a press conference held yesterday.

Kumaratunga’s political foundation was based on an anti-Buddhist philosophy, he said.

“Chandrika couldn’t even save Kuragala from the Muslims even though the land belonged to her family,” Gnanasara said, referring to the sacred Sufi Shrine that was recently “reclaimed” by the Archeology Department of Sri Lanka with the support of the Defence Ministry and extremist Buddhist organisations who waged war against the Muslim pilgrimage site.

Launching a scathing attack on the Sufi prophet associated with the Kuragala shrine, Gnanasara said that the man was a foreign hunter who regularly supplied meat to the walawwa nearby and was in the habit of smoking marijuana.

“He would smoke ganja and sleep in the cave in Kuragala. One day he smoked ganja and fell out of the cave and died. People looked at that and said that this must be the easiest route to heaven – that’s how the place became the Jailani shrine,” the monk said of the Sufi prophet.

“In the end it was the BBS that waged an idealogical war and won Kuragala back for the Buddhists,” he charged.

The BBS said President Kumaratunga’s attempts to champion freedom of religion issues in Sri Lanka and said they were aimed at portraying Buddhists as violent and brutal people.

The moves were aimed at assisting the ongoing international conspiracy against Sri Lanka, BBS Executive Committee member Dilanthe Withanage said.

“Organisations like SAPRI should focus on studies and research on South Asia.

Why is she suddenly focused on religious issues in Sri Lanka?” Withanage questioned.

He said that in the Maldives, Buddhist statues are broken at museums and in Bangladesh, Buddhists were being killed.

“Why only target Sri Lanka?

“Chandrika who never spoke up when the LTTE attacked the Temple of the tooth is suddenly concerned about religious harmony,” Withanage charged.

Withanage said that the US Freedom of Religion Report last year had stated that religious tensions in Sri Lanka had reduced.

“SAPRI meanwhile is doing research that is aimed at damaging Buddhism and alienating Sinhala Buddhists globally,” Withanage said.

Related posts;

Full Court Report: BBS Leader Gnanasara Pleaded Guilty To Hit-And-Run And Drunk Driving

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Latest comments

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    Wonder why Fatma Fukshitma is silent on this one. Maybe (s)he is a secret admirer of the man.

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    His fabricated insult on a humbles well respected mystic saint ,someone loved by Sufi of all faiths is going to be a disgrace on the government.

    Sufis are also loved and respected eve by Israel as the most peaceful religious people promoting harmony all over the world.

    Wiruthu’s and BBs group first attacked the Sufi shrine in sri Lanka ,they became so puffed up with arrogance soon after winning the war they wanted to immediately show off their strength by oppressing the week.

    Soon karma will get them and al those with them ,it has to happen ,otherwise many Buddhist itself will be disappointed in their belief.

    What a disgrace to such a beautiful religion as Buddhism the way it is no interpreted by most of the Sri lankan and Burmese ,it has now become the most violent and in-tolerant faith in the world , other than The khameru (also Buddhists) and some African cults ,it is only the Burmese & Sinhalese Buddhist ho have been known to burn people alive ,dash babies and burn them alive, forget about being humans these people are not even fit to be considered animals OMG.

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    buddhism is the most stupid religion without any logic ,fake 100% ,a myth fabricated by ashoka to cover his cruelties.It is also a very depressing cult ,it is buddhist monks who indulge in ganja to get over their depression and guilt of abusing little boys ,they are pedophiles

    with love to my beloved reverend
    Fathima Fukushima

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    Buddhism is the most negative & the most sick religion on the face of this earth.

    http://rationalist.org.uk/images/Buddha_statue,_Nha_Trang1.jpg Buddhism is the most negative & the most sick religion on the face of this earth ,believe me I use to be a strong practicing Buddhist ,I would not even eat an egg,, Buddhist are the most terrible hypocrites & their hearts are not soft at all but hard and cruel, am an atheist no and am extremely happy, and I have never met perverts who are more sick then The monks. Do not send your children to Buddhist Sunday schools alone,they will be abused for sure. By Dale DeBakcsy , Wednesday, 23rd January 2013 The dark side of Buddhism Buddhism is often seen as the acceptable face of religion, lacking a celestial dictator and full of Eastern wisdom. But Dale DeBakcsy, who worked for nine years in a Buddhist school, says it’s time to think again The great Buddha statue in Nha Trang, Vietnam by Petr Ruzicka Buddha statue On paper, Buddhism looks pretty good. It has a philosophical subtlety married to a stated devotion to tolerance that makes it stand out amongst the world religions as uniquely not awful. Even Friedrich Nietzsche, not known for pulling punches when it came to religious analysis, only said of Buddhism that it was “nihilistic”, but still “a hundred times more realistic than Christianity.” And we in the 21st century have largely followed his lead in sensing something a bit depressing about Buddhism, but nothing more sinister than that. But if we start looking a bit closer, at the ramifications of Buddhist belief in practice, there is a lurking darkness there, quietly stated and eloquently crafted, but every bit as profound as the Hellfires of Christianity or the rhetoric of jihad. For nine years, I worked as a science and maths teacher at a small private Buddhist school in the United States. And it was a wonderful job working with largely wonderful people. The administration, monks, and students knew that I was an atheist and had absolutely no problem with it as long as I didn’t actively proselytise (try and find a Catholic school that would hire a moderate agnostic, let alone a fully out-of-the-closet atheist). Our students were incredibly sensitive and community-conscious individuals, and are my dear friends to this day. However. I have no doubt that Buddhist religious belief, as it was practised at the school, did a great deal of harm. Nowhere was this more in evidence than in the ramifications of the belief in karma. At first glance, karma is a lovely idea which encourages people to be good even when nobody is watching for the sake of happiness in a future life. It’s a bit carrot-and-stickish, but so are a lot of the ways in which we get people to not routinely beat us up and take our stuff. Where it gets insidious is in the pall that it casts over our failures in this life. I remember one student who was having problems memorising material for tests. Distraught, she went to the monks who explained to her that she was having such trouble now because, in a past life, she was a murderous dictator who burned books, and so now, in this life, she is doomed to forever be learning challenged. Not, “Oh, let’s look at changing your study habits”, but rather, “Oh, well, that’s because you have the soul of a book-burning murderer.” To our ears, this sounds so over the top that it is almost amusing, but to a kid who earnestly believes that these monks have hidden knowledge of the karmic cycle, it is devastating. She was convinced that her soul was polluted and irretrievably flawed, and that nothing she could do would allow her to ever learn like the people around her. And this is the dark side of karma – instead of misfortunes in life being bad things that happen to you, they are manifestations of a deep and fundamental wrongness within you. Children have a hard enough time keeping up their self-esteem as it is without every botched homework being a sign of lurking inner evil. As crippling as the weight of one’s past lives can be, however, it is nothing compared to the horrors of the here and now. Buddhism’s inheritance from Hinduism is the notion of existence as a painful continuous failure to negate itself. The wheel of reincarnation rumbles ruthlessly over us all, forcing us to live again and again in this horrid world until we get it right and learn to not exist. I remember one of the higher monks at the school giving a speech in which she described coming back from a near-death experience as comparable to having to “return to a sewer where you do nothing but subsist on human excrement.” Life is suffering. It is something to be Finally Escaped. Now, there are legitimate philosophical reasons for holding to this view. Viewed from a certain perspective, the destruction of everything you’ve ever cared about is inevitable, and when it’s being experienced, the pain of loss does not seem recompensed by the joy of attachment that preceded it. And that yawning stretch of impermanence outside, so the argument goes, is mirrored by the fundamental non-existence of the self inside. Meditation, properly done, allows you to strip away, one by one, all of your merely personal traits and achieve insight into the basic nothingness, the attributeless primal nature, of your existence. Those are all interesting philosophical and psychological insights, and good can come of them. Being hyper-sensitive to suffering and injustice is a good gateway to being helpful to your fellow man and in general making the world a better place. However. There is something dreadfully tragic about believing yourself to have somehow failed your calling whenever joy manages to creep into your life. It is in our biology, in the fabric of us, to connect to other human beings, and anything which tries to insert shame and doubt into that instinct is bound to always twist us every so slightly. If the thought, “I am happy right now”, can never occur without an accompanying, “And I am just delaying my ultimate fulfillment in being so”, then what, essentially, has life become? I’ve seen it in action – people reaching out for connection, and then pulling back reflexively, forever caught in a life of half-gestures that can’t ever quite settle down to pure contemplation or gain a moment of genuine absolute enjoyment. The usual response that I’ve gotten to these concerns is, “You’re sacrificing truth and wisdom for the sake of feeling good. That’s just what you criticise Christianity for, isn’t it?” This would be a pretty damn good argument if I were convinced that the conclusions of Buddhist belief were as ironclad as their usually serene-unto-finality presentation makes them seem. There are two central claims here: that our own fundamental essence is non-existence, and that the nature of the outer world is impermanence. The idea of the void-essence of self is one arrived at through meditation, through exercises in reflection dictated by centuries of tradition. That’s enough to give us pause right there – it’s not really a process of self-discovery if you’re told the method, the steps, and the only acceptable conclusion before you’ve even begun. Here’s the fourteenth (and current) Dalai Lama on how to start a meditation: “First, look to your posture: arrange the legs in the most comfortable position; set the backbone as straight as an arrow. Place your hands in the position of meditative equipoise, four finger widths below the navel, with the left hand on the bottom, right hand on top, and your thumbs touching to form a triangle. This placement of the hands has connection with the place inside the body where inner heat is generated.” This is already an unpromising start – if you aren’t even allowed variation in the number of sub-navel finger widths for hand placement, how can we hope to be allowed to even slightly differ on the supposed object of inner contemplation? And the text bears this out. When speaking of meditating on the mind, the Dalai Lama manoeuvres his audience into a position where his conclusion seems inevitable: “Try to leave your mind vividly in a natural state… Where does it seem that your consciousness is? Is it with the eyes or where is it? Most likely you have a sense that it is associated with the eyes since we derive most of our awareness of the world through vision…. However, the existence of a separate mental consciousness can be ascertained; for example, when attention is diverted by sound, that which appears to the eye consciousness is not noticed… with persistent practice, consciousness may eventually be perceived or felt as an entity of mere luminosity or knowing, to which anything is capable of appearing… as long as the mind does not encounter the external circumstances of conceptuality, it will abide empty without anything appearing in it.” If this reminds you more than a little of Meno, where Socrates leads a slave boy into “rediscovering” the truths of geometry through a combination of leading questions and implied conclusions, you’re not alone. Notice the artful vagueness of the phrase “may eventually be perceived or felt as an entity of mere luminosity” – the subtle pressure that, if you don’t perceive consciousness that way at first, you must keep trying until something in you falls into line and you end up with the “right” answer to meditative practice. Or take into consideration the construction of the questions – how the second question immediately shuts down any actual consideration of the first, and how the answer to that second question leads to a single special case open to multiple interpretations which are again immediately declared to be explicable by only one single answer. As it turns out, you have as much freedom of inquiry as you had freedom in hand placement. In a curious twist unique to Buddhism, rigidity of method has infected the structure of belief, ossifying potential explanations of existence into dogmatic assertions mechanically arrived at. The impermanence of the outer world seems more solidly founded. Five billion years hence, I’m pretty sure that this novelty shot glass next to me is not going to exist in any sort of recognisable novelty shot glass form. Nothing in this room will functionally persist as long as you only admit my Use Perspective as the only relevant lens of observation. The matter and energy will both still exist, but they won’t exist in the configuration which I am accustomed to. And that, apparently, is supposed to fill me with a sense of existential dread. But it doesn’t – at all – and this is the weakness of the conclusions that Buddhism draws from an impermanence theory of the external world. It supposes that I cannot hold in my mind at the same time both an appreciation and attachment to an object or a person as they stand in front of me right now AND a recognition that my use of a particular configuration of matter and energy at the moment doesn’t determine how it will exist for all time. Buddhism’s approach to use-based impermanence attempts to force us into a false binarism where we must either be the slaves of attachment or the cold observers of transience, and that only one of these offers us a way out of suffering. Compelled by the forced logic of its myopic perspective on self-analysis that we saw above, it opts for the latter, and presents that choice as an inevitable philosophical conclusion. So, it’s not really a choice between Feeling Good and Truth. It’s a choice between being able to unambiguously enjoy companionship and a system of thought which uses an ossified methodology bordering on catechism to support a falsely binary approach to our relations with the outside world. At the end of the day, it’s still true that, in many respects, Buddhism maintains its moral edge over Christianity or Islam handily. That instinct for proselytising unto war which has made both of these religions such distinctly harmful forces in the story of mankind is nowhere present. But, the drive to infect individuals with an inability to appreciate life except through a filter of regret and shame is perhaps even more dangerous in Buddhism for being so very much more subtle. Squeezed between the implications of inherited evil instincts and a monolithic conception of what counts as a right answer to the question of one’s own personal existence, a young person entering a Buddhist community today is every bit as much under the theological gun as a student at a Catholic school, but because society has such a cheery picture of Buddhist practice, she has far fewer resources for resistance than her Catholic counterpart. And that allows sad things to happen. I would urge, then, that as fulfilling as it is to point out and work to correct the gross excesses of Christianity (and, let’s face it, fun too), we can’t let the darkness of Buddhist practice go by unremarked just because it works more subtly and its victims suffer more quietly.

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    CHRIST IS LORD
    ================

    Buddhism the most depressing religion in the world
    ——————————————————————

    The reason there are so many suicides among the sinhalese buddhists, which is also noted as the highest in Asia, comes as no surprise at all. Most sinhalese buddhist suffer from schizophrenia, the same mental illness Siddartha suffered from. Siddartha was a very depressed freak who was forcefully kept in the palace until one day he took off and nearly comminted sucide. He never went into any meditation or never ever attained any enlightment. All that is a myth. He was so depressed that he was starving himself to death in the jungle when he was found by a hunter who provided him with fruits and rescued him and took him back to the palace, he later commited sucide.

    It was Ashoka, the evil ,ruthless king, who fabricated buddhism and created the mythical person Buddha .

    Ashoka, too, went in to a deep depression when he suddenly started thinking alone about all the atrocities he did to his people. Some of the ruthless, sick and sadistic things he used to do to his people are beyond discussion, so he fabricated a fake religion called buddhism and used Siddartha as his fabricated person and then he converted from Hindusim to buddhism to “wash away” all his sins.

    Buddhism is a total failure. Its followers are the biggest hypocrites in the world. While boasting of peace, non-violence, free from all sins, they actually live a life right oppesite the teaching of Ashoka The ruthless.

    Fake Buddhism denies all good things in life for its followers, the followers end up very depressed and they end up as Psycopaths. They end up abusing alcohol, drugs and then usually go on a rampage in mass killing , rape etc. You will always find this prevalent in Buddhist-majority countries.

    They usally blame their depressed actions on the devil and then they engage in having witchcraft and devil dance practiced by witch doctors. The witch doctors give the pateints heavy doses of portions mixed with marijuana and opium and other intoxicants which sends the patetients into a frenzy of shaking and dancing .

    Buddhism encourages homosexuality among their priesthood and the young novist priests are actually a gift from poor families for the senior monk to release his carnal desires and it is not considered a sin or wrong.
    Buddhism is the most sick cult in the world
    Finally the often spoken-of tooth relic of the buddha is fake. Buddhists are the biggest fakes on the face of the earth.
    And even after all this, the Buddists who I meet have the nerve to call my religion fake and abusive. You call our Priests pedophiles while your monks molest children everyday. Jesus Christ’s preachings make more sense than this nonsense that you follow.

    Note:

    Ashoka’s Hell was, according to legend, an elaborate torture chamber disguised as a beautiful and attractive palace full of amenities such as exclusive baths and decorated with flowers, fruit trees and ornaments. It was built by King Ashoka (304–232 BCE) in Patliputra (modern Patna, India), the capital city of the Maurya Empire. The legend of the torture palace is detailed in the Ashokavadana, the text that describes King Ashoka’s life through both legendary and historical accounts.

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    THE WHOLE LOT OF COW DUN OF BUDDHISM
    ——————————————-

    Pura Vida
    Life in full circle
    by Judith Lipton, M.D. and David Barash, Ph.D.
    Buddhist Bull
    Buddhism, too, has its own nonsensical mythology.
    Published on December 17, 2013 by David P. Barash, Ph.D. in Pura Vida
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    Something there is in human nature – or at least, in the nature and/or inclinations of some humans—that predisposes toward nonsensical beliefs. Not surprisingly, Buddhism and Buddhists are not exceptions. Thus, even though the Buddha made it clear that he was not a god, and should not be worshiped as one, many of his subsequent followers have done so, and continue doing so, to their discredit … or at least, to the discomfiture of those, like myself, who cherish a scientific world-view.

    In my recent book, Buddhist Biology, I revel in the parallels and convergences between Buddhism and biology. But in order to do so with a clear conscience, I think it behooves us to confront and disassociate ourselves from the silliness that is sometimes associated with Buddhism, and which is no more “scientific” than Jewish insistence on the reality of Moses having been given the Ten Commandments inscribed in stone by God, Christian belief in Jesus’s virgin birth, or the Islamic contention that Mohammed took dictation from Allah via the angel Gabriel.
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    It may appear that I am making fun of what I irreverently call “Buddhist bullshit,” and in fact, that is what I am doing! My goal, however, is not to be sarcastic or critical for its own sake, but to distinguish genuinely useful and powerful conceptual approaches – of which Buddhism has much to offer—from fundamentalist fairy-tales, which abide in Buddhist religiosity just as they do in other forms of stultified religious dogma. Here, therefore, is a brief and admittedly incomplete catalog of nonsensical Buddhism, weedy mythological overgrowth that I reject (and which I encourage all Buddhist sympathizers and wannabes to treat similarly):

    Certain practitioners maintain that by virtue of their meditative skill, they can remember their existence in prior incarnations, or that they can envision their forthcoming experience after their (next) death. Others claim that by ritualistically chanting the name of a particular version of the Buddha, they can achieve literal immortality, freedom from pain, cures for life-threatening disease, and so forth.

    High on the list of absurd Buddhism are the phenomena of iddhi, supernatural events that are supposed to be generated by extremely skillful and committed meditation. They appear often in Buddhist texts, and I don’t believe a word of them. Among the more widespread iddhi is the phenomenon whereby enlightened meditators are ostensibly capable of creating illusory duplicates of themselves or of other things. There seems little doubt that such events—the creation of illusory manomaya—are themselves examples of manomaya.

    In addition, higher meditators are claimed to possess various supernatural abilities, such as becoming invisible on demand, walking through walls, on water, through the air, being able to hear people and other beings very far away, to mind-read, to recall their past lives, and/or possessing “divine eyes” that permit them to see the arising and passing away of karma. We are told, as well, that when the Buddha was born, celestial maidens proceeded to scatter flowers from the sky and nine dragons spouted water to bathe the body of the newborn prince. Monks who die while abiding in a specially blessed meditative state translated as “pure light” are said to remain “uncorrupted,” i.e., free from rot.

    By the same token, immediately after he was born—via his mother’s thigh, mind you!—the Buddha ostensibly stood up, took seven steps and announced that this was the last time he would be reborn. And when, eighty years later, he died, lying on his side between two Sal trees, they immediately and miraculously burst into bloom, although this was out of season. Yet, the Buddha made it clear that he had no evidence for the existence of a personal soul (atman) nor for its more generalized, cosmic counterpart, Brahman.

    Traditional Buddhist cosmology is far removed from anything approaching scientific validity, holding that the world is flat, with a giant mountain—known as Meru—at its center, and similarly, that insects are born from droplets of water. The Dalai lama (a self-proclaimed admirer of western science) has recently admitted that he no longer believes that Mount Meru is the center of the world; I don’t know about the beliefs of other leading Buddhists in this regard.

    The traditional Buddhist cosmology is, however, very specific, and more than a little weird, with the world composed of thirty-one levels. The lowest is a kind of hell, followed in turn by animals, ghosts, titans, humans, five different tiers of lesser gods, fifteen of higher gods, after which one encounters, in turn, “infinite space,” “infinite consciousness,” “nothingness,” and finally “neither perception nor non-perception.” Of these, the lowest eleven encapsulate the sphere of sense-desires, the next fifteen constitute the “sphere of pure form,” and the final four, the sphere of formlessness.”

    Historian of religion David McMahan describes what he calls “Buddhist modernism” as departing from traditional, originalist Buddhism in several respects, one of the most important for our purposes being “demythologization” in which traditional deities and practices are de-emphasized—most often, ignored altogether. For example, so-called “hungry ghosts” (pretas) are traditionally thought to have arisen because of the greedy karma accumulated via their past lives; they are pictured as having skinny, pencil-thin necks, bloated bellies and incessant, unsatisfied hunger. In traditional Buddhist practice, food is ceremonially offered to them so as to buy off their good will, thereby preventing them from doing harm.

    These days, especially in the West, hungry ghosts are mostly considered (when they are considered at all!) to be unconscious manifestations of one’s own dissatisfactions and neediness; that is, they have largely been reinterpreted as psychological entities rather than “genuine” ones. This is another aspect of Buddhist modernism: Reinterpreting what had been taken literally as reflecting, instead, psychological but not physical truths.

    Similarly, according to the Tibetan Book of the Dead (Bar Do Thos Grol), deceased people are said to pass through three distinct stages (bar dos) between their demise and their next reincarnation. Among Tibetan Buddhists, these intermediate stages are populated by various Buddha images, some peaceful and serene, others threatening and wrathful. For Buddhist modernists—notably Carl Jung and his followers, but including non-Jungians as well – these encounters reflect various deep-seated psychological “archetypes,” i.e., our own internal psychic forces, rather than “real” entities. Traditional Buddhists would disagree.

    As McMahan writes, “For traditional Himalayan Buddhists, the world is alive not only with awakened beings but also countless ghosts, spirits, demons and protector deities. These beings are prayed to and propitiated in daily rituals and cyclical festivals, and they figure into one’s everyday life in very concrete ways.”

    A final example of nonsensical Buddhist Bullshit is doubtless considered the most necessary and fundamental, utterly essential and incontrovertible … at least to Buddhist True Believers: the doctrine of reincarnation (more accurately translated as “rebirth”) and its close colleague, karma. This topic deserves a post of its own, not only because it is so important to most Buddhists, but also because – as we shall see – once divested of its abracadabra absurdity and modified by a hefty dose of biological reality, it actually offers some of most intriguing , scientifically valid correspondence between Buddhism and biology.

    David P. Barash is an evolutionary biologist, long-time aspiring Buddhist and professor of psychology at the University of Washington, whose most recent book is “Buddhist Biology: Ancient Eastern Wisdom Meets Modern Western Science, just published by Oxford University Press.

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    Buddhism superstition cause of many evils

    The call of the devils & Buddhist superstition
    http://youtu.be/vApINoz2D90

    Buddhism must be banned for the sake of humanity

    The reasons behind Buddhist violence & sadism could be connected to mental illness justified by a fake sick religion that encourages superstition rather than accept reality and seek medical help.

    Don’t mess with the brain

    A loved one is acting out of character……sleepless nights, disrupted routine, regular bursts of irritability and frequent signs of a personality change. What should family members do?

    Contact an astrologer to see how planet changes have affected him or her. Hold a thovil ceremony to ward off ill-effects

    Always seek medical help if there are indications of possible mental illness says Dr. Raveen Hanwella, Consultant Psychiatrist of the National Hospital.

    Tradition and astrology are fine for the Sinhala New Year, according to him, but when it comes to health, either mental or physical, one must get “scientific treatment” as opposed to “unscientific treatment”. “One must not mess with an important organ like the brain which is very complex but at the same time very delicate. If serious conditions of mental illness are not treated medically and early, there can be permanent residual damage to the brain,” he cautions.

    Non-medical personnel could easily miss the diagnosis because the need also is to look out for or pick up whether somebody requires medical help. “Some medical illnesses such as diabetes, kidney or liver disease can cause changes in the brain while certain drugs and also substances such as cannabis can lead to severe mental illness. Alcohol can precipitate mental illness as well,” said Dr. Hanwella.

    The other causes could be social circumstances, stresses in life, break-up of relationships or even a loss. The reaction to such external events could also lead to mental illness including post-traumatic stress syndrome.

  • 2
    0

    Buddhism superstition cause of many evils

    The call of the devils & Buddhist superstition
    http://youtu.be/vApINoz2D90

    Buddhism must be banned for the sake of humanity

    The reasons behind Buddhist violence & sadism could be connected to mental illness justified by a fake sick religion that encourages superstition rather than accept reality and seek medical help.

    Don’t mess with the brain

    A loved one is acting out of character……sleepless nights, disrupted routine, regular bursts of irritability and frequent signs of a personality change. What should family members do?

    Contact an astrologer to see how planet changes have affected him or her. Hold a thovil ceremony to ward off ill-effects

    Always seek medical help if there are indications of possible mental illness says Dr. Raveen Hanwella, Consultant Psychiatrist of the National Hospital.

    Tradition and astrology are fine for the Sinhala New Year, according to him, but when it comes to health, either mental or physical, one must get “scientific treatment” as opposed to “unscientific treatment”. “One must not mess with an important organ like the brain which is very complex but at the same time very delicate. If serious conditions of mental illness are not treated medically and early, there can be permanent residual damage to the brain,” he cautions.

    Non-medical personnel could easily miss the diagnosis because the need also is to look out for or pick up whether somebody requires medical help. “Some medical illnesses such as diabetes, kidney or liver disease can cause changes in the brain while certain drugs and also substances such as cannabis can lead to severe mental illness. Alcohol can precipitate mental illness as well,” said Dr. Hanwella.

    The other causes could be social circumstances, stresses in life, break-up of relationships or even a loss. The reaction to such external events could also lead to mental illness including post-traumatic stress syndrome.

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    [Edited out]
    by Joel Adamson – in 43 Google+ circles
    Jul 29, 2013 – I’ve even seen self-identification on cars: recently (not in Boulder, in … People fond of Theravada Buddhism will often charge Mahayana and … we all do things does drive us mad and to behaving like [Edited out]. … just me) are anxious and depressed and what we can do about it. ….. Join 242 other followers.

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