1 March, 2024

Blog

Forget The politicians & Their Bureaucrats, This Is Why We The Public, Need To Understand Climate Change – Part III

By Ranil Senanayake –

Dr. Ranil Senanayake

Another largely unaddressed fact that frames Climate Change is the fact that global Oxygen concentration is falling. The two graphs, one from the US and the other from Australia demonstrate that this loss is global. The only process that can add free molecular Oxygen into the atmosphere is photosynthesis, carried out by leaves of plants and phytoplankton of the ocean. Given such a significant impact on the Global Commons of atmosphere and given the fact that a warming ocean holds less Oxygen. Understanding the role of Oxygen is important in climate change. 

It is a fact that the sustainability of Oxygen production is being endangered by the fossil driven economy. The expansion of fossil energy based industrial farming at the expense of vast regions of forests not only destabilise the atmosphere by accelerating global warming, it also removes the very basis of life by burning biologically created Oxygen without paying for its replacement.  Around 26 million tons of Oxygen is used to maintain the current rate of global consumption of oil, about 90 million barrels of oil per day. It would require over 225 million trees working for one year to produce an equivalent amount of Oxygen.

The signs are all around. A recent study on the levels of Oxygen in the ocean found that the oceanic Oxygen levels decreased by 2 % over the last 50 years.  On land, the font of Oxygen are the leaves of trees. Another study published in the journal Nature suggests that 15 billion trees are cut down each year and the global tree count has fallen by 46% since the beginning of human civilization. 

Anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion is the largest contributor to the current O2 deficit, which consumed 2.0 Gt/a in 1900 and has increased to 38.2 Gt/a by 2015. This way, approximately 100 Gt (gigatonnes) of O2 would be removed from the atmosphere per year until 2100. At an average, a human, needs about 750kg of Oxygen per year. All of humanity consume about 7 Gt per year. The trajectory is disturbing. Sri Lanka, in the Country statement to COP 21 suggested a solution, it stated :

We are aware that the critical Ecosystem services such as; production of Oxygen, sequestering of Carbon, water cycling and ambient cooling is carried out by the photosynthetic component of biomass. This is being lost at an exponential rate, due to the fact that these Ecosystem Services have not been valued, nor economically recognized

As the inception of all ecosystems begins with Primary Productivity, its first measured outputs are termed Primary Ecosystem Services (PES). These are the actions of photosynthesis in a leaf. These actions are, Oxygen generation, Carbon Dioxide sequestration, water cleansing and ambient cooling. 

This suggests a way forward, recognizing the value of PES can provide a huge economic boom, it also creates an incentive for the public to participate in the essential work of environmental repair. There are other benefits in recognizing the value photosynthetic biomass as the proxy for PES. Photosynthetic biomass can retain value only as long as it is living. – A leaf on a tree, for instance, has value only as long as it is carrying out the activity of photosynthesis and producing PES, pluck that leaf and the activity ceases, as does the value. – The economy will, for the first time begin to put a value on life. Such an economy will increase photosynthetic biomass everywhere and render that area rich in environmental services as well in economic opportunities. It will change urban – rural relations into a more equitable and sustainable state and rapidly increase the biomass capital of the planet locking up Carbon Dioxide.

The initial ideas for marketing the growth of photosynthetic biomass was presented at the Forestry Congress in Havana, Cuba in 2011. There would be an increase of Oxygen generation, Carbon sequestering and water cleansing, throughout the planet. Additionally, because the degraded ecosystems around the planet offer the space where a large amount of biomass can be gained and as these areas are also home to the world’s rural poor, these degraded ecosystems have great growth potential for generating photosynthetic biomass of high value and generating wealth for its occupants. If the restoration of these degraded ecosystems to achieve optimal photosynthetic biomass cover becomes a global goal, the amazing magic of photosynthesis could indeed help change our current dire course, create a new paradigm of growth and make the planet more benign for our children. There is capital to power such activity. The current estimated annual value of ecosystem services is US$16–54 trillion. Living photosynthetic biomass is an ideal substance to capitalise it.

Yet currently, it is only one product of this photosynthetic biomass, sequestered carbon, usually represented by wood/timber or fruit and vegetable that is recognized as having commercial value in the market for mitigating climate change. The ephemeral part, the leaves, are generally ignored, yet the living photosynthetic biomass in terrestrial ecosystems, is component that needs a value placed on it for its critical ‘environmental services’. 

One suggestion address the problem is to create  process that create positive externalities and place value on things that externalize their input into the Global Commons. This process of ‘giving back’ or externalizing the output of contracted  entities are valued and recorded. Each unit of the system is measured for its production of contracted Primary Ecosystem Services (C-PES) which are the products created by photosynthetic biomass, Oxygen, Carbohydrate and clean water. Recorded over time, these products protect the health and sustainability of a myriad of natural ecosystems on terrestrial landscapes. The transaction history maintained as a certificate or on a blockchain, will create wealth by monitoring and recording the transaction values to the Global Commons.

The Sri Lankan government has already recognized the value of this approach to the rural sector. Instead of flogging the dead horse of fossil energy based growth as ‘Economic Development’, can we respond to the call for a change in our systemic thinking, by appreciating the value of photosynthetic biomass and become the first country in the world to propose setting such a value? The realization of which, will enrich not only our rural population but change the lives of rural people the world over ! 

The realization of Ecosystem Service values, reflected as rural wealth, has the capacity to reverse the destructive path we are on. It can redirect the current economic dialogue based on profiting from negative externalization, which is leading us to death and destruction, to an economic dialogue based on the profit of positive externalization, leading to life and restoration. One company has already picked up the baton (www.restore.earth), hopefully many more will follow this new path and create a livable future for humanity.

Climate Change is real and will impact all of us one way or another, it is accelerated by the consumption of fossil fuels that drive ‘economic growth’. But there are ways in which we can respond. Many have been known for long time, some are new, but unless we inform ourselves and prepare to respond to the oncoming changes, Climate Change could bring some very unpleasant surprises. The public need to be informed on probabilities and responses on a constant basis, Climate Change means, floods, droughts, fires, rising seas, heat etc. may happen at very short notice, unless we have response plans for each scenario, it means that some of us will suffer the consequences. This is a full obligation of the authorities to be fully cognizant of the regional climate predictions and advise vigilance in advance. Remember that for agriculture, breeding heat tolerance and salt tolerance is a critical need and cannot be done on a short time frame. In a future with a rapidly changing climate, we the public, must strive to protect each other. Looking at each other as a wolf does a sheep, cannot create a nation nor protect it.

Concluded

Related stories:Forget The politicians & Their Bureaucrats, This Is Why We The Public, Need To Understand Climate Change – Part II

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Latest comments

  • 1
    0

    Dr. Senanayake

    We all know, at least those who live in developed countries, that climate change is real. The uncontrollable forest fires in Greece followed by floods, unprecedented heatwaves all over Europe & change in weather patterns all over the world have been attributed to green house gasses caused by pollutants in the air. Of course there are deniers & little SL has other things to worry about.

    I just read an article in CT about how rich nations are trying to capitalise on a tragic event to discredit the govt. According to the writer, even SL’s attempt to contribute to the green agenda is woven into this conspiracy as SL’s carbon footprint is negligible, therefore, irrelevant. For argument’s sake, forget the carbon footprint, are we ok with the air quality in big cities like Colombo? London mayor is concerned about the air quality & wants to extend the Ultra Low Emission Zone to cover entire London & discouraging motorists with high polluting vehicles to pay a fine. It has been established that, particularly, asthmatic children, suffer from life threatening breathing problems due to poor air quality. Is the air quality in Colombo better than London?

    • 0
      1

      “We all know, at least those who live in developed countries, that climate change is real”
      If so how do you explain the conduct of the US?
      *
      Besides, there is a measure of hypocrisy in the environmental concern in the West. The pollution associated with the manufacture of goods that they consume in abundance has been shifted to the Third World for production with cheap human and material resources.
      Will the West cut down on its consumption of non-essentials?

      • 1
        0

        SJ
        There will always be sceptics & deniers whatever the subject. Trump is climate change denier because he wants to give hope to unemployed miners of reviving the coal industry, even though it is unviable, & also assure the texas oil industry of unrestricted business. Tories are also back pedalling on their environmental commitment by continuing to license north sea oil fields. However, the majority in developed countries are aware of global warming, many having already experiencing the change in weather patterns this summer.
        Industries are the major polluters but there are tax incentives to reduce their carbon footprint & fines for excessive polluters. China is one of the biggest polluters as laws are less stringent & able to flood markets with cheap products. It is not the West that is dumping cheap products to third world countries. European ban on fossil fuels comes into effect in 2030 but the transition is already on with sustainable energy sources, even domestic heating with gas is being replaced with solar panels & underground heat pumps. SL has no major industries, therefore, the carbon footprint is relatively low but with an ageing vehicle population & polluting 3 wheelers, the air quality in big towns as Colombo, is questionable. Old diesel vehicles which do not comply with Euro 5 emission standards (pre 2005) have no filters to trap carcinogenic carbon particles.

  • 1
    0

    Dr. Senanayake

    We all know, at least those who live in developed countries, that climate change is real. The uncontrollable forest fires in Greece followed by floods, severe hurricanes in US, unprecedented heatwaves in Europe & change in weather patterns all over the world have been attributed to global warming caused by pollutants in the air causing a ‘green house’ effect. Of course there are deniers & little SL has other things to worry about.

    I just read an article in CT about how rich nations are trying to capitalise on a tragic event to discredit the govt. According to the writer, even SL’s attempt to contribute to the green agenda is woven into this conspiracy as SL’s carbon footprint is negligible, therefore, irrelevant. For argument’s sake, lets forget the carbon footprint, are we ok with the air quality in big cities like Colombo? London mayor is concerned about the air quality & wants to extend the Ultra Low Emission Zone to cover entire London by fining high polluting vehicles. It has been established that, particularly, asthmatic children, suffer from life threatening breathing problems due to poor air quality. With all those polluting 3 wheelers, smoking busses, trucks & ageing vehicles, is the air quality in Colombo better than London?

    You have a Herculean task convincing because we in SL, believe in conspiracies of the West.

  • 0
    0

    Apologies, my original comment was accidently posted & contains a grammatical error.

  • 0
    0

    “The Sri Lankan government has already recognized the value of this approach to the rural sector (i.e. C-PES).”

    EVERY government realizes it, even much polluting USA and Saudi. No big thing on GoSL’s part for finally recognizing it this late in time!

    Question: How will C-PES link up with Ranil’s Ram Sethu to-the-Moon-and-Stars-Bridge? Will polluting trucks be transporting trees then?

  • 0
    1

    Fossil fuels are still the most economical method to obtain energy. And energy is the single most essential thing necessary for human flourishing. It is used to heat and cool environments, to transport goods, to build houses and infrastructure, and importantly to PROTECT FROM ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTERS.

    There is no economically viable alternative to fossil fuels right now. It is a very important reason why previously poorer nations like China have grown tremendously in wealth and quality of living for the people. Therefore to forbid fossil fuels, particularly in a poor nation like Sri Lanka, is to forbid a most important thing necessary for Sri Lanka to regrow its economy, protect its people, and increase the
    standard of living to what is acceptable.

    I recommend reading “Fossil Future” by Alex Epstein for a well researched study on the importance of fossil fuels.

Leave A Comment

Comments should not exceed 200 words. Embedding external links and writing in capital letters are discouraged. Commenting is automatically disabled after 5 days and approval may take up to 24 hours. Please read our Comments Policy for further details. Your email address will not be published.