2 December, 2020

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Get It Right Now Or Pay The Price

By M.A. Sumanthiran

M.A. Sumanthiran MP

M.A. Sumanthiran MP

Mr. Deputy Chairman of Committees, as I rise to speak on this Order that has been placed for approval, I cannot but recollect the time when the Hon. Minister of Justice and Labour Relations himself, seated on this side, opposed the extension of this Order when it came up two years ago. In fact, that Order had lapsed before it came up for extension and it was he, who pointed out to the House, that that Order could not be extended because it had lapsed and the Order had to be remade and that is why a bill had to be brought again, the Code of Criminal Procedure (Special Provisions) Act, No. 2 of 2013. The original Act having lapsed, the Hon. Minister, the person who pointed it out rightly at that time from the Opposition Benches, today is propounding the extension of this illogical and draconian provision. This is another one of those ironies that we are faced with of a Government that was established for good governance.

Twenty four hours time is the limit before which, under ordinary laws, a person must be produced before a magistrate, only to be produced before a magistrate. If he is suspected to have committed an offence that is non-bailable, as it is called, then the magistrate would remand the person, certainly at least for the first 15 days and thereafter, take over the directions of the investigations and under Section 115 of the Criminal Procedure Code, I believe, a magistrate would direct the investigations. That is the safeguard that our country is used to. The Hon. Minister himself said that merely extending it from 24 hours to 48 hours is not going to aid the investigation to be completed within 48 hours; nobody expects the investigations to be completed by 48 hours. If that be the case, what is the necessity for a person to be retained in the custody of the police when we have so much of evidence of abuse by the police of persons who are in their custody? The Prevention of Terrorism Act has an exceptional provision to the ordinary law, Section 25 of the Evidence Ordinance, that a confession made to a police officer maybe admissible in evidence if it is made to a police officer not below the rank of Assistant Superintendent of Police and subject to an inquiry by court if its voluntariness is challenged. That has been pronounced as a draconian provision and we know how that particular provision has actually impeded good investigations. Today, we have people convicted of offences purely on their supposed confession extracted through torture by the police whilst the actual offenders are, at large, roaming the streets. That is what the PTA resulted in. I think this maybe an opportune moment for me to urge the Government to repeal the Prevention of Terrorism Act. The Hon. Minister was heard to say that this is only a temporary provision, – Special Provisions – and that it will lapse in another two years. The Prevention of Terrorism Act was brought as a Temporary Provisions Act for a period of six months in 1979. But, for how long has it remained? In 1982, it was amended to remove, “Temporary Provisions” and it was made permanent and it has stayed in our statute books to the detriment of the country, to the detriment of several crimes being properly investigated and, at least, with the knowledge, with the good knowledge, of these facts, I am saddened that the Hon. Minister of Justice and Labour Relations is moving for the extension of this Order.

Talking of investigations, I would also like to raise another important issue today, and that is with regard to the Commission on Missing Persons chaired by Mr. Maxwell Paranagama. Missing persons or enforced disappearances is a scourge and an atrocity that we have committed on each other for quite a long time in this country. This is the most insidious and cruel act. It is also a crime that has not spared any corner of the country. We saw this spectacle in other parts of the country in the late 1980s. We must all, therefore, be united in the pursuit of remedies for those who have disappeared, for we are all witness to the desperation and trauma it has unleashed on all sections of our people. We are mercifully, only now, beginning to emerge from the shadows of the white-van culture and I appreciate what the Hon. Prime Minister said this afternoon that there is certainly a space that has opened up: people who are complaining about various misdemeanours and misdeeds are not getting threatening calls, white vans are not appearing at their doorstep, and that is to be acknowledged. Still, – the persons who are responsible for having committed – this dastardly act of disappearance of loved ones is continuing. No proper investigation has taken place for the disappearances that have taken place for the last several decades. It is in this background that this Commission on Missing Persons was appointed and I wish to categorically state that this Commission, the Paranagama Commission, has been a farce. I have been to the hearings of this Commission at least twice and I have raised some issues. The Government, and particularly the Foreign Minister are well aware of this because we have heard the Hon. Foreign Minister speak about this when he was on this side of the House. This Commission has received nearly 20,000 complaints, but there is a great selectivity in the way that witnesses are called to give evidence here. I have seen personally, the moment a witness comes close to identifying the perpetrator in her evidence, immediately, the Commission intervenes and stops that evidence and starts asking about whether they have received some chicken or some goats for their livelihood, and invariably the mothers of the disappeared scream and say, “I do not want a goat, I want my son back because I handed over my son to the security forces. I am an eye witness to this. I, myself, handed the person over. I do not want your chickens, I do not want your goats”. That is the pain that they suffer and this Commission has done more to inflict pain on them than it has done to ease it. This is one of those issues.

Now, there is another aspect to this. There was an expansion of mandate given to this Commission, an eminent group of advisers or they were so-called, “appointed to advise this Commission”. Sir Desmond de Silva was the Chairman of this Panel, of these advisers.

This House will note, Mr. Deputy Chairman of Committees, that the expanded mandate of inquiry that Sir Desmond was to advise included the question of “…whether such loss of civilian life – loss of life during the final stages of the war – is capable of constituting collateral damage of a kind that occurs in the prosecution of proportionate attacks against targeted military objectives in armed conflicts and is expressly recognized under the laws of armed conflict and international humanitarian law, and whether such civilian casualties were either the deliberate or unintended consequences of the rules of engagement during the said armed conflict in Sri Lanka”.

Mr. Deputy Chairman of Committees, I state with responsibility that Sir Desmond de Silva was previously retained by the then Government of Sri Lanka to provide it with an opinion with respect to the legality of the conduct of the Government forces during the last stages of the war. On 23rdFebruary, 2014, five months before he was appointed by former President Mahinda Rajapaksa to chair the Advisory Council to the Commission, he provided his client – the Government – with a legal opinion stating: “Based on my instructions, my analysis of the relevant law, from the factual matrix made available to me and other research, my opinion is that great mass of civilian deaths which occurred in the final stage of the conflict were regrettable, but permissible collateral damage”.

Sir, this is the most serious matter. What this means is that when Sir Desmond de Silva was appointed as Chair of the Advisory Council to the Commission of Inquiry – a Commission under our law is supposed to function independently and impartially – Sir Desmond de Silva had already come to a conclusion on, at least, some of the questions the Commission he was asked to advise, was mandated to investigate and had communicated this position to the Government of Sri Lanka. In other words, the Government appointed a person who it already knew, had formed an opinion on the question to be investigated by the Commission, to advise that Commission. What then, is the independence of this Commission? In fact, the framing of the expanded mandate of the Commission suggests that the questions may have even been drafted, based on the opinion provided by Sir Desmond de Silva. This is the most perversion of justice and I demand that the new Government immediately constitute an investigation into the conduct of Sir Desmond de Silva and the previous Government, in conspiring to undermine the independence of the Commission of Inquiry. I also demand that His Excellency the President immediately rescind Sir Desmond de Silva’s appointment to the Advisory Council as a matter of urgency in order to secure the Rule of Law and Good Governance.

But, that is not the end of the matter. Sir Desmond de Silva was clearly retained by the Government prior to his providing the Government with the opinion on 23rdFebruary, 2014. There was, therefore, an attorney-client relationship between Sir Desmond de Silva and the Government on questions of liability pertaining to loss of civilian life during the last stages of the war. It was in the context of this prevailing relationship that Sir Desmond de Silva was appointed to chair an Advisory Council to a supposedly independent Commission that would inquire into the guilt or otherwise of the Members of the Government – his client. This is a clear case of blatant conflict of interest and on this count too, I demand that the new Government of Sri Lanka, not only immediately rescind Sir Desmond de Silva’s appointment but also forward a complaint to the Bar Standards Board of the United Kingdom against Sir Desmond de Silva’s patent professional misconduct. I also urge other interested parties to do the same. This behaviour must not be tolerated by this country or by the Bar of which Sir Desmond de Silva is a Member. What then of the Commission of Inquiry that has been stripped of any independence in this way? I do not understand why the Government continues to let this Commission of Inquiry to function. I propose that the existing Commission be discontinued for it is too flawed for any good to come of it. Instead, I propose that a fresh investigation with real investigative powers be constituted to actively seek out the fate of the disappeared. The complaints and proceedings of the Paranagama Commission can be used by this new investigation, if necessary. That body should have the power to search, seize and even detain, if necessary. They should be mandated with bringing victims, sons and fathers, back.

Mr. Deputy Chairman of Committees, this is a very serious issue with regard to inquiries. This Government, in the latter part of February, has given a written undertaking to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights that it will set up a local mechanism with technical assistance and advice from the OHCHR. But, in fact, what it has done is that without discontinuing with this flawed Commission, has allowed this Commission to continue and that is the reason why when this Commission had sittings in Trincomalee, first time after this new Government came into being, there was widespread protest. The protest was not about inquiring into the fate of the disappeared, but it was about the Paranagama Commission and how flawed that was and despite this Government’s own undertaking that this would be rectified and a new mechanism put in place with international supervision and assistance, this flawed Commission was allowed to continue with the so-called experts in international law, the Chairman of whose panel, Sir Desmond de Silva, became most unsuitable to function in that post due to his attorney-client relationship with the Government of Sri Lanka five months prior to his appointment to this Advisory Council, in addition to several other flaws that I have explained. This Commission continuing to function in this way would be blatantly in violation of the undertakings given in writing by this Government to responsible international actors – to the UN Human Rights Council, to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights – and I urge that you put these things right at the beginning itself, because if you start going down this wrong path – it is only the beginning – you too will end up like the Rajapaksa regime and that is not something that we want to see.

You have clearly articulated and very bravely declared – even today, the Hon. Prime Minister made a very bold speech in this House and we welcome that – but, if your words are to translate into actual actions, we would like to see some of these things properly rectified. Please do not go down that same path. You are extending the Order made which was flawed, even according to you, Hon Minister, when you were seated on this side and you are doing that today. I gave you another example of the Paranagama Commission and the Panel of Advisers. I urge that you do not continue with that utterly-flawed system, the system that was an eyewash to the world. Rather, I most respectfully urge you: be transparent, be sincere, face the truth, because that is the only way in which we can all together retrieve this country from the mess that it has got into.

Thank you very much.

*Speech Made in Parliament by M.A. Sumanthiran M.P. on the 17th March 2015

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Latest comments

  • 9
    27

    Sir Desmond de Silva had already come to a conclusion on, at least, some of the questions the Commission he was asked to advise, was mandated to investigate and had communicated this position to the Government of Sri Lanka.

    Sir Desmond de Silva is a Queens Counsel, is a highly respected International law expert. In one instance UK Prime Minister David Cameron appointed Sir Desmond to investigate war crimes in Northern Ireland.

    There is a piece of paper online somewhere purporting to be the work of Sir Desmond de Silva. Sir Desmond de Silva hasn’t signed it. It has not been properly authenticated.

    Before some cheap lawyer question integrity of Sir Desmond de Silva perhaps they need to check if the evidence is suspect first.

    • 12
      9

      Someone feeling a wee bit jealous ?

    • 18
      1

      What Mr. Sumanthiran has explained clearly is that there is a conflict of interest issue with Sir Desmond de Silva being appointed as a supposedly neutral and independent advisor to a commission of inquiry investigating government culpability in certain matters when he had earlier given an opinion in favour of the government when retained by the government to advise it on these same matters.

      Of course, some persons will never be able to grasp this line of reasoning!

    • 9
      2

      Sir Desmond de Silva made similar comment in UK in April 2012, and therefore to say that this is not his view, though he may not have signed any document, is trying to cover up his credibility as an impartial person.

      In a dinner meeting organised by APSL with their AGM, where he was the guest speaker, he said killing of 40,000 Tamils, in order to liberate 300,000 of them from the clutches of LTTE, cannot be termed a war crime.

      He was applauded by the bigoted Sinhala sycophants present, but the Tamils who were gathered were angry over this idiotic statement. Fortunately they showed restraint and nothing untoward happened to him on that day.

      This matter was reported to the British Government, who are of the view that war crimes have been committed which needs to be investigated, and since then Dr. Desmond de Silva has not been given any responsibility.

    • 10
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      Hey Vibushanam, you are referring to MAS as a cheap lawyer? Coming from a low life prick like you, we will accept that as a compliment. Thanks Vibushanam.

    • 8
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      “Cheap lawyer”??? Come on Vibushana, your slip is showing – and we don’t want to see what’s underneath! So, going by your ‘standards’ why not provide some evidence of “cheap” before you cast that first stone?

    • 0
      0

      Vibushanam is letting one of his brain farts out.

  • 32
    7

    Mr. Sumanthiran,

    You were at your best, in pointing out that there is no reason to ,

    1. Extend Act # 2 of 2013
    2. Continue the Paranagama Commission charade.
    3. Lend credibility to Sir. Desmond De Silva’s disgraceful role.

    You have expounded the reasons clearly , soberly and truthfully. You have also spoken for all Sri Lankans who want answers to what happened to the sons, daughters, husbands, fathers and relatives during the JVP insurrections and the Eelam wars. I am sure there are Sri Lankans who want answers to, what happened to their kin, who enlisted in the armed forces and are listed as ‘ Missing In Action’.

    Dr.Rajasingham Narendran

  • 6
    38

    A two bit lawyer is upset that an eminent QC and world renowned expert in international law has analysed the evidence and torpedoed We Thamizh propaganda. Boo hoo hooo :D

    • 19
      5

      We know the quality of renowned Sinhala QC s …we have read many racisit articles in the press written by them …

      Are you really the Malayali Shiv Shanker who made the blue print to massacre Tamils and hiding behind a fake name??

      In India everyone know how Malayalies het jobs and promotion selling everything..and Chechies are popular in Middle East and how they get jobs and promotion there is an international joke.

      By the way Mr.Sumenthiran is a talented criminal lawyer in this country

      You can’t expect a right balanced decision by a Sinhalese in Tamil issue…. this is a history

      • 6
        23

        Go cry to the Lord Chancellor about how evil unqualified Sinhaloids have taken over the highest echelons of the British legal system :D

        • 9
          2

          Wee Thamihz Seniour Jouranalist D: Siva Sankaran Sarma Menon

          “Sinhaloids have taken over the highest echelons of the British legal system :D”

          The highest echelons of the British legal system also had legislators such luminaries as

          Labour MPs

          David Chaytor,
          Elliot Morley,
          Jim Devine
          Eric Illsley
          John Stonehouse

          Tory peers

          Lord Taylor of Warwick
          Lord Hanningfield
          Jeffrey Archer

          Jonathan Aitken, a former chief secretary to the Treasury

          Tory MP
          Keith Best

          Liberal party MP
          Jabez Balfour

          Lawyers

          Constance Briscoe
          Rohan Anthony Pershad QC
          Michael Roberts

        • 6
          1

          Wee Thamihz Seniour Journalists D: Siva Sankaran Sarma Menon

          Lessons learned from Pat Finucane murder, says David Cameron
          PM says MI5, police and military intelligence’s use of informers has been transformed since Belfast killing in 1989

          Henry McDonald, Ireland correspondent
          Friday 16 January 2015 19.28 GMT

          MI5, police and military intelligence’s use of informers has been transformed due to lessons learned from the Pat Finucane murder scandal, David Cameron has said.

          The prime minister outlined to parliament how the government had responded to the findings of a damning report two years ago on the loyalist killing in 1989.

          The government-backed review by Sir Desmond de Silva found that a number of state employees “furthered and facilitated” the Ulster Defence Association’s targeting of the Belfast solicitor, and there were efforts within the security forces to thwart the criminal investigation into the murder.

          Up to 29 members of the Belfast UDA unit responsible for the killing were working for one or more branches of the security forces in Northern Ireland at the time. Finucane’s family and human rights organisations have claimed there was direct collusion between the security forces and the UDA in the murder.

          After the report was published in December 2012, Cameron asked the defence secretary, the Northern Ireland secretary and the cabinet secretary to conduct an assessment, and on Friday he published their joint findings.

          “Significant changes have been made since the time of Patrick Finucane’s murder to improve the situation and today’s framework for operations bears little resemblance to that of 1989. Additionally, there is far more effective independent oversight and control than existed in 1989,” the prime minister said in a written statement to parliament.

          He said the use of covert human intelligence sources (CHIS) – a new euphemism for state informer – had been “completely transformed” in the years since the murder. “Compliance with human rights and other legal obligations has a fundamental place at the centre of activities by the police and intelligence services with the principles of necessity and proportionality now firmly embedded in the culture and systems they apply in their work.”

          At the time of the De Silva report’s publication the murdered lawyer’s wife, Geraldine Finucane, branded it a “sham, whitewash and confidence trick”, claiming it cast all blame on now dead individuals and disbanded organisations while exonerating government ministers, serving officers and existing security agencies.

          The report identified 270 leaks of sensitive intelligence gathered by the state that were passed on to loyalist paramilitaries between 1987 and 1989 alone. These would have included sheets containing the photographs, addresses, car registrations and other personal details of republican suspects.

          During this period one member of the rival loyalist terror group the Ulster Volunteer Force said these papers were “more common than beer mats” in loyalist-controlled drinking clubs and bars, where they were passed around in order to target republicans.

          http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jan/16/
          lessons-learned-finucane-murder-david-cameron

          Pat Finucane’s widow denounces de Silva report – video

          http://www.theguardian.com/uk/video/2012/dec/12/
          pat-finucanes-widow-de-silva-report-video

        • 5
          1

          Britsih politicians are visiting homes of Tamils to get votes he he he …..do you know Siva Sankaran Silva?

          Cowards always hide their real names …..and you are one of them ..

          • 2
            4

            That’s nice dear. I presume you bent over and dropped your pants when they came over – have to keep We Thamizh traditions alive, right :D

            • 4
              1

              Wee Thamihz Senior Journalists D:Siva Sankaran Sarma Menon

              “I presume you bent over and dropped your pants when they came over”

              It has been a tradition (newly acquired way of life) among beach boys of the Southern Coastal Area. Many eke out a living dropping their pants down and getting infected with HIV. It is regretable Wee Thamihzs Senior Journalist has opted out of reporting such lurid real life stories, one of self censorship. Probably because he/she/it didn’t want to offend Sinhala/Buddhists.

              Read this:

              Sex tourists prey on Sri Lanka’s children: Beach resorts are hunting-grounds for European child abusers and pornographic video makers. Tim McGirk reports from Colombo

              independent.co.uk
              Wednesday 19 January 1994

      • 1
        1

        He is said to be David B, ex of the Sri Lanka army, who has no issues with everything the army is accused of having done, including the massacre in 2012 at the Welikada jail.

        No surprises here, I suppose, let him too be brought to book.

    • 14
      3

      Wee Thamihz Seniour Journalist D: Siva Sankaran Sarma Menon

      Please remember Mahinda and his son too are legal luminaries. I wonder why they were unable to defend the clan and country and had to hire people from outside?

      Very confusing.

      • 6
        1

        Why is David B still hiding as Siva?

        • 6
          1

          Robert.R,
          Are you referring to the only army deserter who also later became a ‘defence analyst’?

    • 10
      2

      Lawyer M.A. Sumanthiran has more gray matter in the tip of his little finger than you have in your entire cranial cavity.

      • 2
        0

        Clarification: This comment is intended for Siva Sankaran Sarma.

        • 1
          2

          Did he [Edited out]

          • 3
            1

            Wee Thamihz Senior Journalist D: Siva Sankaran Sarma Menon.

            “Did he [Edited out]”

            Writer’s block perhaps. Lost for words?

            Or is it interlinear inscription?

            Or ontological insecurity?

  • 9
    1

    I tend to agree with what MAS declares about the extension of the PTA and on issues raised about Sir Desmond de Silva QC. It is more than 5 years since the end of the war, terrorism eradicated even according to the much reviled MR. Then why extend this draconian piece of legislation, let alone extend what is already lapsed, so that we signal to the rest of the world that despite appearances, our system is unstable.

    On SDdS, QC, I recall when MR hurriedly appointed a 3 member committee almost under duress, criticism was made that they were far from independent, mentioning the very point MAS has made above. Are Sri Lankan’s incapable of realizing that this amateurish intransigence speaks volumes of the lack of understanding of what an independent investigation means and its consequences to the Government and any efforts towards rehabilitation?

  • 10
    2

    A report published in The Guardian in London, in 2012 has revealed that a report compiled by Sir Edmond de Silva following an investigation into one of the Northern Ireland’s most controversial killings, had been heavily criticized by the victim’s family as ‘sham’ and ‘white wash’.

    The report had been compiled on the death of Patrick Finucane, a Republican, who had been murdered on February 12, 1989 by one of the loyalist gunmen. Patrick’s wife – Geraldine had been campaigning for over two decades for a public inquiry into the murder of her husband but when the inquiry was finally concluded, it had offered scant relief to her.

    Geraldine has been quoted in the Guardian as follows:
    “At every turn, dead witnesses have been blamed and defunct agencies found wanting – serving personnel and active state departments appear to have been excused,”

    According to Colombo media he expressed his following views in a conference held in 2011:
    1. “The blame for the civilian casualties during the final phase of the war ‘lies squarely at the door of the LTTE”.
    2. “In fact, the death of some hostages has occurred in many operations that are directed against hostage takers. The crime therefore is not committed by the forces of law and order, but by the hostage takers, in this case the LTTE,”

    We know why he was chosen as the chief advisor to the commission.

    • 2
      2

      Britsih politicians are visiting homes of Tamils to get votes he he he …..do you know Siva Sankaran Silva?

      Cowards always hide their real names …..and you are one of them ..

      • 4
        0

        cholan

        “Britsih politicians are visiting homes of Tamils to get votes he he he …..do you know Siva Sankaran Silva? “

        They would visit Tamils houses wouldn’t they its the election you stupid. Do they also wash your clothes, cook rice and curry, carry your b***s?

        Do you know that LTTE and Hindia took your people for a ride.

    • 6
      1

      And UN instead of saving Tamils under International law vacated the area as requested by Dogabaya because of the instruction of this Malayali chief of staff at UN…then blamed LTTE cooking up stories,,,this is the fact

      Private bank accounts and property purchase after 2009 of all malayalies in Delhi administration during massacre and UN New York should be investigated …these guys are corpse eating animals …Malayalies will do anything for jobs and money ..without shame…

  • 9
    1

    Touche Mr. Sumanthiran. I hope the Bar Association looks seriously into your call for them to act. I doubt the present govt will do anything about it. But I hope they will surprise us all.

  • 2
    10

    MP Sumanthrian has to join democratic national politics first.

    TNA still is fully influence by LTTE of Anarchist of Terrorist ideology . That is still barrier Until TNA has to change into national politics that majority people believed in Island.
    Majority of people is not that trust which TNA is National political class and Party.

    The track records of TNA having suspensions of their past deeds of politics by majority democracies.

    • 11
      1

      Sirisena yatawara

      “MP Sumanthrian has to join democratic national politics first.”

      Where can we find this “democratic national politics”?

      “The track records of TNA having suspensions of their past deeds of politics by majority democracies.”

      Sorry what are you trying to say here?

  • 3
    1

    New government, old tricks. Do they not understand they are under a global spotlight now? They need to run a proper investigation, not some sham exercise in self-vindication. Anyway, come September the new government will be facing the UN process again and as usual they will do nothing with the time they have been given.

  • 3
    0

    Two whole days allowed for police to produce alleged criminals/those who acted against the laws of the land, to produce them before a magistrate, give the police sufficient time to intimidate/torture them to extract “confessions”, intimidate possible witnesses,& “manufacture” evidence against them.
    No woman will visit a police station alone, especially at night – for reasons well known. To keep women for two whole days in police stations is hence, inhuman.
    These “tactics” of the police are common.

    That these happenings are common has been reported by UN Rapporteurs like Manfred Novak who visited, and investigated.

    Recently, another case of an arrested man “hanging himself” in a cell in a police station was reported in the media – despite the fact that for any adult to hang himself, a distance of at least ten feet is necessary from the floor to the roof – the cells in police stations are only six feet high with concrete roofs which have no fixtures required to knot the cord required for a hanging.
    This fact appears to be ignored by inquiring magistrates.

  • 0
    0

    The government is trying to shape.

  • 3
    0

    Vibushana.

    The issue here is not about the Forensic skills of Sir Desmond.If you reread the speech of Sumanthiran it would be clear. No doubt Sir Desmond hails from a legal family.His father Advocate Fred de Silva and grand-father George R.de Silva Member of the old State council practised in the Kandy courts.In fact George R.de Silva had to face many an indignity at the hands of the other lawyers practising at Kandy at that time.Notwithstanding his caste he was elected to the SC.

    Sumanthiran,is quite rightly contesting the suitability of Sir Desmond,in dual roles [Double-acting like in Indian films].

    Notwithstanding all this the Final report of the commission of missing persons will also go missing!

  • 4
    1

    Sir Desmond de Silva’s father was Fred de Silva . His father was George E de Silva. George E de Silva’s sister was Rosalind de Silva. Rosalind’s grand son was Lasantha Wickrematunge. So Lasantha and Sir Desmond are cousins. The past government of Mahinda Rajapaksa was accused of or covering up Lasantha’s murder. Surely Sir Desmond knew of this? MA Sumanthiran has made a sound argument. I read somewhere how much the government had paid Sir Desmond. Millions!!!! So there….

    • 2
      0

      Lal,

      I read about the enormous sums of money paid to Desmond De Silva and other so-called ‘advisers’ by the previous regime in the Sunday Times political column. I was wondering why the CT posters who call him “eminent” and so on, hadn’t brought up the money issue. Thanks for bringing that up, and thanks for shedding light on your ( if you are the real Lal, the brother of Lasantha) family connection to Desmond De Silva–I am surprised that he finds “money is thicker than blood!”

    • 1
      0

      Agnos,
      I am Lal Wickrematunge

  • 2
    1

    Dear all, come to the reality which all the Tamils most south Indians and Indian lay people and many in this planet know and believe. directing all the blames on LTTE is not going to help. It is not going reconcile or solve the problem. If not solved this is going to linger more longer time. Until ww 3 or 4 and Eelam w 5 or 6.
    Look MR has hooked SL in the line of the Chinesere fisher man. The hook and Line is so strong and India or the west can’t relieve it easily. This has big relevance with the Indian and pacific ocean security plan. M3 can’t sort it out.

  • 0
    2

    Mr Sumanthiran should respect Vaddukoddai resolution

    • 2
      1

      Pacs

      “Mr Sumanthiran should respect Vaddukoddai resolution”

      Vaddukoddai resolution was dead on arrival the same evening it was passed.

  • 0
    1

    Native.

    Late M.Tiruchelvam Q.C.I understand was rather wary about the Vaddukottai resolution.As you might know Amirthalingam,who was not even an MP IN 1976 was aspiring to take over the Leadership of the FP! With his oratorical skills he was able to convince the others and the Resolution was passed,and in the process the Tamils were led up the garden path!

    Look at this contradiction.If the resolution was to establish a separate State,and they had a mandate to do so why the bloody hell did he enter Parliament and also end up as a Leader of the opposition?

    It was a case of hunting with the Hounds and running with the Hare!

  • 2
    0

    MAS

    Do the good works you have been doing, at least a few of you have been left at last to highlight what is not right to SL, and its minorities. If current regime is really serious about good governance, why do they extend the PTA in perpetuity?. Obviously a draconian piece of legislation, which should be made redundant as soon as the first opportunity arises by a Government which gloats about the good governance. If good governance respects human rights and it shouldn’t keep passing the PTA.

    There are jealous politicians who are trying to seek some cheap attention by burning effigies of Mr Sampanthan and you, don’t give a hoot about it.

    • 1
      1

      Aia,

      “There are jealous politicians who are trying to seek some cheap attention by burning effigies of Mr Sampanthan and you, don’t give a hoot about it.”

      The populists are stealing the show. Don’t know if they are jealous but they understand what many people in the North want.

      Does anybody know has the lady who received 50000 votes achieved anything else than burning effigies, some foreign attention and going to court asking questions about the MIA husband? Isn’t the MIA husband her only qualification?

  • 2
    1

    Sumanthiran,

    In case you read comments on CT:

    You are the most intelligent of all the ITAK and TNA politicians. That is however also your disability when you meet the people who don’t read CT. You are only 50 years old and can become a great leader if you manage to reach the voters in a way they understand. All the best!

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    We love and admire you Mr. Sumanthiran. You are a great man.

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    There are many of us who are astonished at the sheer ignorance of MP Sumanthiran. The fact that a lawyer or a judge has construed the law in a particular way , can not possibly lead to the sort of allegations that Sumanthiran makes! If he is correct , then every judge who has heard a similar case in the past and given a legal ruling will be disqualified from hearing a similar case in the future because he has already expressed his legal views! This is a mad view of the law. The attack upon Sir Desmond de Sila, QC , whose independence is so great that the UN itself have used him – is a cheap and nasty thing to do . Just because the interpretation of the law may not be to his liking Sumanthiran wants de Silva removed.. This is LTTE fascism at work!!

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