30 May, 2020

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It’s A Great Deal More Complicated & Uncertain Than One Thinks: Lockdown & Control Or Herd Immunity?

By Kumar David

Prof. Kumar David

There is a debate going on out there in the big wide world between the advocates of lockdown (Isolation and Confinement – I&C) and champions of Herd Immunity (h-i) as to the better method to overcome the Covid-19 pandemic. What’s going on in Sri Lanka is extreme, draconian and excessive harassment, especially of the poorest classes but I will reserve my comments on Lanka for the end. My main objective today is to weigh up the international debate between advocates of I&C and h-i.

Before getting my teeth into details let me summarise the two views. I&C chaps want to identify and quarantine every contact, trace, trace, trace and test, test, test. If infected and asymptomatic (those who show no external signs) carriers are all isolated till they get well (no longer carry the virus), or conveniently conk off, the community can be declared virus free. Restrictions can be lifted and all can get back to having a good time, unless a global depression subsequently turns them into paupers. 

The h-i advocates don’t agree. They say let everybody catch the disease, let everybody get it. Antibodies will develop in the body (sic!), the whole community – the whole herd – will become immune and there will be nothing more to fear. If you got chicken pox as a kid you won’t get it again. You grow antibodies (some sort of good chaps) in your system to defeat the first illness and they hang around ready for action if needed again. Though the international web contains much information the local media has, I think, made no mention of h-i. To get clued up I ask readers follow up on the web the world’s leading experts on h-i, Dr Nils Anders Tegnell, civil servant, physician in infectious disease and State Epidemiologist of Sweden, and Dr Didier Raoult, French physician, microbiologist and president of Universite de la Mediterranee, Marseille. An extreme version is Prof. Johan Giesecke. It’s good to be up to date on the vocal global debate on the relative merits of I&C and h-i.

What’s the case against each school? It’s deadly. The objection to I&C is that try as you may you can never ensure CV-19 will not raise its head again unless everybody in the community goes to live in a cave in the Himalayas forever. When our government says Lanka is CV-19 free, workers will go the Middle East, international commerce and travel will start, tourists will arrive and kids will go to school. The idea is that we can get back to normal life. But aye, there’s the rub. This CV-19 is as vile and virulent as a mother-in-law’s tongue. It spreads like greased lightening – otherwise why all this misery and harassment we are subjected to every day? As sure as the sun will rise in the East each morning it will be back; there will be fresh recurrences.

The crux of the case against I&C is that you can never prevent a second-wave, a third and so on. Are we going to go through the horror of the last 60 days again and again every year? You can see where the critics of I&C are going: “De facto the epidemic stops only when herd immunity is reached after cycle upon cycle. Till then its’s an invincible force; it will not end till h-i is reached”. The I&C defence is that numbers must be kept down to a level which hospitals can cope with till a vaccine is found or immunity develops in the community at large. At a minimum one has to buy time.

There’s a number called R which epidemiologists are swooning over. It’s a measure of how rapidly a disease is spreading. Its fancy name is “effective reproduction rate” and signifies the number of people to which one infected person will pass a virus. If R=2 for example, one guy will give it to two and those two will give it to four more and so on. The magic is to make R less than one in which case the disease will wither away, once identified cases are cured. Small R is great, but the problem is that it changes all the time and could rise quickly as lockdown ends or people go out to work or lose patience with restrictions. 

What’s the case against h-i? Sweden refused to lockdown, except for the old and sickly, leaving people to catch the infection spontaneously hoping to achieve h-i. But what happened was that the death rate increased enormously. On 20 May, the number of confirmed cases in Sweden was 30,800 with 3745 deaths (12.2%), compared with Norway 8264 confirmed cases and 233 deaths (2.8%) and Denmark 11,044 confirmed cases and 551 deaths (5.0%). A study in the Financial Times (UK) said, conservatively, deaths in Sweden would reach 50,000 before heard immunity is reached. 

The other point about h-i is that it has, to my meagre knowledge, not been achieved with any previous disease. Smallpox was controlled by vaccination and wiped out ultimately by extinguishing the bacillus itself. Humans have not developed h-i to polio though it has been around for ages – was Richard III crippled by polio? There is no cure or protective vaccine for SARS and herd immunity is not a WHO goal. The medieval Black Death (bubonic plague caused by bacterium yersinia pestis) is still around (most recently in Madagascar in 2017) and humans have not developed herd immunity. What reason is there to believe that CV-19 will be any different?

The debate has political overtones but readers should not take any notice and focus on scientific and epidemiological merits only. Don’t be intimidated by the snooty; if people are real experts, they can explain things in a way that ordinary folks can understand as Einstein and Eddington did with relativity. Political partisanship in broad terms shows that the political right like Republicans in the USA, Brazil’s Bolsanaro, UK’a Boris Johnson and those keen to get the economic engine restarted as soon as possible, oppose lockdown, oppose stopping full participation in work or restricting travel and want freedom of movement. On the other side are liberals, those who want the state to play an interventionist role and are prepared to let capitalism, that is the economy, pay the price. 

Sri Lanka is an exception in that a right-wing government with an authoritarian bent is imposing the harshest I&C intervention in all the world. It implements extreme I&C, that is L&C (Lockdown & Curfew). I will explain why in a moment. Another loose cannon screwing up the debate is Donald Trump and his asinine interventions. If only he would shut up, everybody could learn more about costs and benefits and the world would be in a better position to make informed decisions. I will leave it at that and turn to the most unpleasant part of today’s essay, the way the authorities in Sri Lanka are dealing with the CV-19 challenge. 

It is unpleasant because one has to be appreciative of the prodigious efforts of the health authorities, nursing and medical staff and the ordinary foot-soldier, unfortunate sailor and the by now fed-up policemen, but at the same time be critical. What is it that one needs to be critical of? The curfew and lockdown have gone over the limit, its just too much harassment – 60,000 citizens arrested and 17,000 vehicles impounded for curfew violations, isn’t this a good barometer that people are fed-up! Gota, his taskforce and the state have to stop playing nanny. Let adults make their decisions, the Director of Health and the army are not God, nor do they know what’s best for the public; the people alone know that. When the populace surrendered its right to make decisions to Adolf, Benito and Joseph the despotic state arrived. Let not this happen in Lanka. I don’t want this essay to deteriorate into a diatribe against Gota so let me phrase my closing paras carefully.

Lanka has been successful in keeping total cases down to just over a thousand and deaths below ten. But many other countries have achieved comparable results without crippling society and the economy with such harsh measures (still the good record is a feather in the cap of the authorities). The Island of 18 May carries a full-page account “How Europe and US are working to prevent a second wave”. The piece has nothing to do with prevention of a second-wave but is an interesting summary of the measures currently adopted in the US and about 10 European countries. What is striking is that everywhere else it is far less punitive, grim and disruptive. Lanka’s authorities are also oblivious to the horrifying impact this mindless insensitivity will have on the economy down the road. 

Despite a more lenient approach mass demonstrations have broken out in America, Germany and all-over South America against hardship, ‘trampling underfoot” democratic freedoms and damage to the economy. In Lanka, the masses curse the restrictions under their breath but will not openly oppose Gota and military-police over-lordship. The masses last defied the state in 1953. Insurrectionary folly did so in 1971 and 1989, but since then they have got accustomed to the military and police egging them on or turning a blind eye when they rampaged against Tamils and more recently Moors. Defying the state even when oppressed is not for Lanka’s masses anymore. A kept people who enjoy mauling minorities under the approving eye of the state is not capable of asserting their freedom. The Gota regime can go on as it likes, it can tell parliament to go hang, and it can rule by fiat and automatic rifle without a public whimper. This is the upshot of victory in a racial civil war, as it was in Serbia, Sudan, Rwanda and other places. 

But in the end, “it’s the economy stupid!” This essay cannot go on for another 1000 words so I direct you to initial coverage by Ranga Jayasuriya (‘Long-term Economic Costs’) and Kusal Perera (“Exit Strategy”) in the Daily Mirror, 5 and 15 May, respectively They make a critical, a very critical appraisal of strategic failures to plan ahead on the economic front, and start thinking about what needs to be done. It’s future economic hardship that may induce the public worm to turn.

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Latest comments

  • 1
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.

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  • 4
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    We hear of herd immunity as a strategy in managing the covid-19 pandemic in a few countries like U.K. and Sweden. They have back tracked on it.
    ——————
    Herd immunity is not a guaranteed occurrence. It may have been possible for small pox, while noting that small pox virus can remain dormant in nerve tissues and become active later in life causing shingles. But h-i hasn’t been possible for many viruses either through natural exposure or via vaccination. For example, Influenza flu vaccination is required annually.
    ——————
    No guarantees that there will be an effective vaccination. We haven’t been successful in finding an effective vaccine for many viruses.
    ——————
    Sweden has recently clarified that their approach wasn’t entirely based on the possibility of herd immunity but rather acceptance of a level of endemic manageable by its healthcare facilities (i.e. not exceed its capacity).
    ———————
    Given Sri Lanka’s limited health care resources (as in many countries including some developed nations), the lock down was a necessary step towards ensuring our our healthcare facilities weren’t inundated and we could serve all patients who needed the care. The curfews as means to a successful lockdown is a different topic.
    ——————
    Here’s an excellent article for a reality check;
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/22/why-we-might-not-get-a-coronavirus-vaccine

    • 5
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      Sugandh
      Thanks for that sobering comment.
      However, the flaw in Sri Lanka’s lock-down was its implementation without consideration for the distribution of essentials. It has also badly hurt the livelihood of the self-employed, casual labourers and small traders.
      Also strict health checking and implementation of rules at the immigration may have averted the problem altogether.
      If public health officials were given the responsibility of controlling COVID-19, we may have avoided the infection of Navy personnel and the consequent rise in numbers.
      *
      Are you sure that Sweden has backtracked from its scheme?
      A problem with immunization against viral and bacterial infections is that it makes people more and more dependent on vaccines. It is of not much good to any but the pharmaceutical businesses.

      • 3
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        SJ,
        Yes, surely the government didn’t have an immediate and adequate plan to have essentials distributed in those areas that were under constant curfew. The low and middle-lower income groups would have been the ones most disadvantaged and suffered the most. Also, the harvest of many farmers went to waste without a way to get it to the market.
        These lockdowns have far greater economic damage in the third world.
        ——————
        Another lack of Government foresight was where curfew breaks were given but on a rather short notice at times, the rush to the bank and the market were not conducive to social distancing.
        ——————
        Sweden has not outright backtracked… but has offered various explanations and clarifications. The Swedish PM has lashed back saying theirs is not a soft approach and that it has not been business as usual. The rate of unemployment nearly doubled there as a result of the pandemic. Pundits have cited constitutional constraints on the approach that Swedish government can mandate. (We have no such concerns in SriLanka!)
        https://www.forbes.com/sites/heatherfarmbrough/2020/05/14/why-swedens-approach-to-coronavirus-may-not-be-what-you–think/#5af741372464
        ——————

  • 5
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    On the positive side it’s time for SL to develop a self sufficient economic model. For generations lazy incompetent and backward politicians have imported products such as rice instead of developing local industries. For example the nation is surrounded by the ocean yet it imports fish from far way Chile! . Globalization is over. Americans have already shifted their factories to Mexico, Ecuador Guatemala etc. Closer to home. Americans are not going to be buying stuff made in katunayake, ja-ela and ratmalana. The tourism industry is also over. SL tourism can forget about promoting ” the land like no other ” . The beaches of Maldives, Thailand and far far superior.

    • 1
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      Yes.
      .
      Forget about fish.
      .
      We ended up importing “bada irigu” destroying lots of poor farmers livelihood.
      We ended up importing “gammiris”
      We ended up importing “TEA”………

      • 3
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        SCP,
        “We ended up importing “gammiris”
        We ended up importing “TEA”………
        There is no harm in imports if you can pay for them with exports.
        We take loans to build useless ports and highways. Then we take more loans to reduce the congestion caused by the highways. Dubai imports everything but has no oil. Its main exports are services.
        We can’t do the same here because our people only elect thugs and murderers. Some even think money comes in ships.

        • 4
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          old codger

          ” Dubai imports everything but has no oil. Its main exports are services.”

          We export services in the form of maids into neo-slavery.

        • 0
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          Mr. old codger,
          .
          I really can’t understand why you people are always lying.
          .
          You say “Dubai imports everything but has no oil. Its main exports are services””
          .
          You kidding…..?
          .
          Yes.
          Travel & tourism industry is the main income for Dubai. It’s true.
          But 80% of the population is expats. They are not there for sleep overs.
          .
          These are the Dubai’s main exports.
          1. Mineral fuels including oil & natural gas :- US$92.5 billion.
          (29.2% of total exports)
          2. Gems, precious metals :- $45.9 billion.
          (14.5%)
          3. Electrical machinery, equipment :- $27.3 billion
          (8.6%)
          4. Machinery including computers :- $17.6 billion
          (5.6%)
          5. Vehicles :- $12.9 billion
          (4.1%)
          6. Aluminum :- $6.4 billion (2%)
          Plastics, plastic articles: $5.5 billion (1.7%)
          Tobacco, manufactured substitutes: $4.5 billion (1.4%)
          Aircraft, spacecraft: $4.2 billion (1.3%)
          Perfumes, cosmetics: $3.5 billion (1.1%)
          .
          Mr. old codger.
          Do not lie to prove a point. It invalidates what you are trying to say.

      • 2
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        SCP,
        .
        according to you, you have ended up not importing everything but not yet touch to DRUGs why ?
        .
        Is that because Rajakashes mafia is mainly connected with KUDU business ?
        :
        Nimal Lanza thenumber of business man to fund Rajakshes election campaign….. if anyone with a bird brain would check his reords how this bitch s son collected that much of wealth having started his carrier as a bumster/beach boy in Negambo area, whole lot of truths about DRUG trafficking int othe country will definitely be exposed, but MAFIA boss stands like BIG ROCK between local court investgations and Lanza.WITH the publicity being given by Hiru TV regarding painting the picture in favour of the criminals.

        There are enough evidence to prove what I have said above – those who are really interestedin could get htem directly on the web.

    • 3
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      Westham,
      “On the positive side it’s time for SL to develop a self sufficient economic model. “
      One can only do that in a country with educated leaders and a disciplined population. Here , TV is full of Bana preaching, not even a cigarette can be shown, but yet there are more people in queues to buy liquor with their 5000 bucks than for food.
      I don’t think you were an adult in the 70’s when we didn’t import anything and suffered with sandy rice (only 3 days a week), permits for weddings , and queues for bread at 4 am.
      Been there, done that, my friend.

      • 3
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        old codger

        “I don’t think you were an adult in the 70’s when we didn’t import anything and suffered with sandy rice (only 3 days a week), permits for weddings , and queues for bread at 4 am.”

        I don’t think SJ is going to like you.

        SJ genuinely believes 1970 – 77 was the Golden Era,

        free rice from moon,
        shortage for tyres tube,
        shortage for clothes,
        there was NM’ feecs system for foreign exchange control,
        people couldn’t travel abroad due to restriction on foreign exchange,
        people needed to obtain police report (exit visa) if they wanted to leave the country, couldn’t import plant, machinery, equipment, …. raw materials (except – Dasa Mudalali)
        Students couldn’t pursue overseas studies due to lack of foreign exchange (except Anura Bandaranaike)
        destruction of cooperative movement.
        …..
        ….
        ….
        according to my elders.
        Load of rubbish went on during 1970s in the name being socialism.
        Land reform was a failure.

        Emotional hung up, colonial misplaced anger, ….. perverted history, bottled in Sinhala/Buddhist Socialism have now turned into Asgiria blessing fascism.

        It was a huge mistake by your generation, including Spring Koha’s as well. Now that I have blamed your generation for all the misfortunes of past 72 years, I feel better. Now I can go about doing my mundane things as if I had done my duty.

        Take care.

        • 1
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          Native
          S.J. is more tolerant than you might think. Be that as it may, there were a few good things about the 70’s, in a perverse way.
          There was equality, because:
          1. Everyone was skinny (except Anura B) because there was little food.
          2. Nobody had vehicles (except AB), so there were no convoys.
          3. Everyone (except Anura)had to wear a Duro shirt, which was available in any colour as long as it was blue or red.
          Another good thing was that girls wore very short skirts, Anura’s sisters included. I don’t know if they were making 2 skirts from the 2 yards ration.
          Still, Chandrika B was a sight for sore eyes then, more than one could say for Mahinda.
          Young fellows like you should do some research. Don’t believe everything you see on YouTube

        • 1
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          Native
          S.J. is more tolerant than you might think. Be that as it may, there were a few good things about the 70’s, in a perverse way.
          There was equality, because:
          1. Everyone was skinny (except Anura B) because there was little food.
          2. Nobody had vehicles (except AB), so there were no convoys.
          3. Everyone (except Anura)had to wear a Duro shirt, which was available in any colour as long as it was blue or red.
          Another good thing was that girls wore very short skirts, Anura’s sisters included. I don’t know if they were making 2 skirts from the 2 yards ration..
          Still, Chandrika B was a sight for sore eyes then, more than one could say for Mahinda.
          Young fellows like you should do some research. Don’t believe everything you see on YouTube

  • 1
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    [edited out]

    There is little to no evidence that lockdowns work. There is little to no evidence that can confirm the exact nature of this virus. We don’t need the likes of Kumar David bloviating and misleading us about subjects he knows nothing about. What we need is an exercise of common sense, and the realisation that the world didn’t shut down during far worse epidemics and flu pandemics in the past 50 years. However, ageing socialists like David will do anything to promote theories that require government handouts in order for the world to function – after the economy is forensically destroyed through nonsensical lockdowns of course.

    • 1
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      There is a serious, disciplined and civilised exchange of ideas here, which has been interrupted by this anonymous “Bagehot” taking cheap pot shots at Prof. Kumar David who initiated the discussion.
      .
      He did the same thing on 14, May, 2020
      .
      https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/more-droll-stories-of-gotas-lockdown/
      .
      and hurled insults at me, Panini Edirisinhe, for which I asked explanations:
      .
      Sly and Slimy Pseudonymous Coward, . . . I have replied to both your points – where’s your response?
      .
      I have repeated the request on the 23rd when Prof. David wrote the sequel:
      .
      https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/more-droll-stories-of-gotas-lockdown/
      .
      Where is this coward Bagehot?
      .
      Same emphasis as earlier. May I suggest that Bagehot should respond at the very end of the comments by Tuesday, the 27th, so as not to break the sequence of this interesting discussion?
      .
      The problem here is that he utters false anonymous slanders, and then doesn’t have the decency to acknowledge his mistakes.
      .
      Panini Edirisinhe (NIC 48 3111 444V) aka “Sinhala_Man”

      • 0
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        Mr. Sinhala_Man,
        .
        Have not seen you are talking against idiots like leela ge a… or kali when they are using bad words.
        .
        Have not seen you are talking against RH when he cought lying.
        .
        Have some principles. Apply them equally.

        • 0
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          Dear Mr Pasqual,
          .
          My reasons for dismissing you peremptorily:
          .
          Prof. Kumar David has written about COVID-19: Control or Herd Immunity? Your request is off-topic. You’re a man with a definite political agendum – I’m not getting involved in that.
          .
          “leelagemalli” I now consider a friend. Unfortunately I have no personal contact details for him. He is a guy with lovely, generous thoughts that enrich this website. If I have decided to interact with him on that basis; that is my business. I have been an English Language teacher, and I know how difficult it is to write in any language. He uses German as well. I remember that many on this website decided that with the moderators fussing, they would use BP as the Sinhalese equivalent of “son of a bitch”. I don’t like it, but I’m not going to play Language Policeman here. That is my decision.
          .
          RH (Professor Ratnajeevan Hoole?) has been discussed in many articles recently. I consider him one of the most honest people anywhere. Anybody can make a mistake. He made rather a silly mistake taking his daughter to his office at a sensitive time. I will not discuss it here.

        • 0
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          PART TWO
          .
          It is for the moderators to decide on “Walter Bagehot”. Professor Kumar David is a regular writer here, and is one of the very best. Also a man with principles. Three articles ago, this Bagehot had the impertinence to slander me on a matter related to a school. That has nothing to do with your type of politics. On the other hand, what Bagehot had the temerity to interfere in is a serious social concern, on which the likes of you (who are here as a lackey of the Rajapaksas) will not take the trouble to research and write. The problem for “Walter Bagehot” is that even he (although he’s an alumnus of those schools) has chosen to write without knowing the facts. If my hypothesis is proved wrong, and you write after study, I may respond to you – but I’m almost certain of my surmise about you being a troll.
          .
          So, any further comment from you here is likely to be ignored by me.

      • 3
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        Bagehot should be an ultra joker on the pay of any Rajaakshe supporter.
        .
        He should be able to take the challenge of Mr Sinhala Man.
        .
        Mr SM, just leave it please, no worth wasting your valuable times for the kind of dimwits.

        • 0
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          leelagemalli, I’ll drop that Bagehot thing for now. Actually enough has been said about that. It’s all available on the web already.
          .
          I think that I’ll call it a day. I have testified to the things I’m certain of. I think that I’d better see how things pan out.
          .
          I did go across to that other article where we were making some posts:
          .
          https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/multiplicity-of-cults-in-the-name-of-buddhism/
          .
          It’s too much for me to handle. As I clearly stated this Israeli Professor was introduced to me only about three weeks ago. It takes time to work things out, and all that I’d like to humbly do is to bring him to the attention of others who may be able to explore some of these new ideas relating to technological advances.
          .
          Don’t get put off by the “Isreali” part of it. Most of us have reservations about that country’s role in world politics. This is a man whose mind ranges eclectically across various systems of beliefs.
          .
          At this moment I’m certain of one thing only. Young people must assert themselves and prepare for a very different world once artificial State Controls are lifted.

          .

  • 0
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    The task force in Sri Lanka has handled the Covid19 infections well with the mortality rate at less than 1% and no Covid19 clusters in the Country other than sites under the control of the Task Force. The availability of over 500 Navy persons with antibodies to serve in high-risk airport related areas is another plus point. Antibody tests need to be carried out to check whether this Navy Camp has achieved Herd Immunity.

    The removal of curfews from 4.00 a.m. to 10.00 p.m. is welcome, but not allowing people stranded with inability to move to Colombo or vice versa needs to be removed as early as possible.

    • 3
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      LDL,
      .
      QUote
      The task force in Sri Lanka has handled the Covid19 infections well with the mortality rate at less than 1% and no Covid19 clusters in the Country other than sites under the control of the Task Force
      UNQUOTE

      beg to differ to your self-congradulations but the truths is even day before yesterday there were 52 or more among the infected according to latest updates. And most among them are from forces how come ?
      .
      Even in the far poor african countries forces are relatively disiplined than any others in each of their countries.
      :
      But if all is as you said, well managed, why forces to be the easy targets in COVID-19 INFECTIONs ?
      .
      Secondly – if as you said, why on earth their number of TESTS performed sofar are still twice lower to that of far poor Nepal ?
      .
      Facts and figures about COVID controls:

      WHO recommendations say – test – test – test… those who did so, were able to manage the COVID crisis within their boundaries but others fail

      Examples
      :
      Here we focus only on like minded examples
      .
      Thaiwan (as an island nation)
      Vietnam
      Nepal
      Singapore
      Venzeula
      Cuba
      .
      have managed it to the top while the numbers in Europe is though under control but germany is leading among the other grand nations to have contained it with 92% of recovery rate as of today.

  • 1
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    Native,
    S.J. is more tolerant than you might think. Be that as it may, there were a few good things about the 70’s, in a perverse way.
    There was equality, because:
    1. Everyone was skinny (except Anura
    B) , because there was little food.
    2. Nobody had vehicles (except AB), so
    there were no convoys.
    3. Everyone had to wear a Dasa shirt
    (except Anura)
    Another good thing was that girls wore very short skirts, Anura’s sisters included. I don’t know if they were making 2 skirts from the 2 yards ration.
    Still, Chandrika B was a sight for sore eyes then, more than one could say for Mahinda.
    Young fellows like you should do some research. Don’t believe everything you see on YouTube.

    • 2
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      Mr Codger,
      .
      Thanks for your posts. If OPEN economic policies would have been introduced to the nation, going by ” middle path way of life – madyama prathipadhawa”, things would not have ended up this much dangerous to srilanken society.
      :
      See, is it not a sorry sight to see total helpless housemaids seen cornered and some times sleeping under the benches, in Dubai, Quatar or other ME cities while waiting for your transit in such airports. The very same is the case in Milano and singapore if you would check it with frequent travellers. Most of them are exported to those places for no reasons.
      :
      Instead, why cant the GOVTs sofar go for export of SKILLED workers as done with Nigeria and several other countries in Africa where our teachers could find teaching carriers. I have got to know few nigerians in my life – that spoke only good about srilanken teachers. I also met Jordanians that revealed me vulgar stories about the srilankens housemaids in Jordana and ME countries. Most of those maids according to them are subjected to sex abuses wihtin those 4 walls.
      The numbers are not insignificant so that any state should have not reacted. But our BALLIGE puthas in power would only be interested in FOREIGN currencies by any means. No matter even Rajakshes bastards sons would have raped anyone, their politics would not work on drug mafia, media mafia or any other mafia acitvities which are overflowing in SL today.

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