30 November, 2022

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Napoleon And Racism

By Charles Ponnuthurai Sarvan –

Prof. Charles Sarvan

Preface: Sri Lanka is in crisis and to write on anything else at this juncture would leave one open to the charge of being a Nero indulging himself by playing the flute while Rome was on fire. But other things, though temporarily relegated to the background, exist, and I hope this short (but, I trust, not vacuous) article will provide a brief distraction.

Of the hundreds of books on Napoleon, few dwell on his attitude to, and treatment of, non-white people. The following is taken from The Black Count by Tom Reiss, a biography of General Alexandre Dumas, father of the famous writer whose works include The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo.  Page reference in what follows is to this work. The portrait painting reproduced on the book’s cover is not of the General but of his internationally famous son, the writer, in the uniform of his father.

Dumas was born in Haiti in1762. His father was a white Frenchman of noble birth, his mother a black slave. (As Reiss comments, given the reality then, almost all sexual relations between whites and blacks was rape.) In a life marked by precipitous plunges and heady heights, the boy was once sold into bondage by his father but was then brought by him to France and enrolled in an elite school. Tall and with “an athletic figure”, Dumas was “educated in the classics, philosophy, fine manners, riding, dancing and duelling” (page 10). Rejecting his father’s name, he opted for that of his mother – Dumas, often signing his name not as Alexandre but simply as Alex. Enlisting as a private, his intelligence and outstanding courage led to rapid promotion in the army of the Revolution, a revolution in which he sincerely and passionately believed. As Reiss observes, he rose to the rank of General by the age of thirty-one; commanding divisions and armies. While Napoleon sought domination and personal glory, the ideal of Alex Dumas was liberation.

In Judaism, Christianity and Islam there are stories of a persecuted person falling asleep and waking up years later to find that the beliefs for which he had suffered now had official sanction and popular following: “Oh brave new world” (Shakespeare: ‘The Tempest’). Of the French Revolution, the Wordsworth wrote in a poem: “Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive”. But Napoleon turned a potential Utopia into a dystopia for people of colour: as Joseph Conrad wrote in his novel, Under Western Eyes, revolutionary success can mean hopes ”grotesquely betrayed, ideals caricatured… There have been in every revolution hearts broken”. The Revolution had abolished slavery but Napoleon reinstated that most cruel of systems. “Rekindling the cruellest traditions of slavery in the sugar islands, French soldiers tortured, raped and murdered blacks in every gruesome way imaginable” (page 311).

Francis Toussaint (1743-1803), born a slave, led the only successful slave revolt in modern Western history. (He added Louverture to his name: the French word can be rendered as ‘opening the way’). On the orders of Napoleon, French troops tricked, captured and sent the hero to France. I cite from page 311: This man of the tropics was thrown into a freezing cold cell with dripping wet walls and a fire that, on orders from Napoleon, was inadequately fed with wood. His iron frame now huddled before the logs measured out by the orders of Bonaparte. The hitherto unsleeping intellect collapsed into long hours of coma.

The so-called Directory government that ran France in the mid-to-late 1790s “instituted the world’s first colour-blind elite secondary school. It gave the sons of former slaves […] one of the world’s finest educations at a time when the English-speaking world still considered it a crime for black children to learn to read” (pages 185-6). Under Napoleon, such children were unable to attend any school at all (p. 187). On the 20th of May1802, Napoleon re-imposed slavery which had been abolished by the French Revolution. “Two weeks after the slavery decree, Napoleon issued a law banning all officers and soldiers of colour who had retired or been discharged from the army from living in Paris and the surrounding area […] The following year, Napoleon outlawed marriages between people of different skin colours” (p. 314). It is significant that such a man, one who had betrayed the  principles of the Revolution; a racist is uncritically admired by so many: his treatment of black people simply does not register. When General Dumas died, the pension due to the widow was not paid and the family was plunged into poverty (page 321).  His wife “would spend the next decade petitioning the emperor through every possible channel for the minimum of support to which she and her children were entitled” (ibid).

Napoleon and Dumas had been comrades-in-arms. Indeed, Dumas was a general when Napoleon was still a captain, and continued to outrank him until December 1795 (page 196). Dumas believed in the ideals and principles of the French Revolution, while Napoleon’s goal was personal power and glory – at all and any cost. For example, “Dumas clashed with Napoleon on the issue of how to treat civilians” (193). Regarding the treatment of women, Dumas told Napoleon that the law may command but humanity demands (page 195). He also told Napoleon: “I believe that the interests of France should come before those of a man, however great this man may be. I believe that the fortune of a nation cannot be subdued to that of an individual” (250).

Dumas, the writer, tried to have a statue of his father erected but without success. However, after his death a group of his ardent admirers fulfilled that wish: it was to honour ‘their’ writer rather than his father, the General. The statue was demolished by the Nazis during their occupation of Paris: Napoleon would have applauded.

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Latest comments

  • 5
    0

    Nationalism and racism often go together, as they have a strong element of hatred towards the other in common.
    Napoleon was also the one who vigorously implemented the oppressive language policy effectively prohibiting all languages other than French and even dialects other than ‘official French’. (This misguided policy had its roots in the French Revolution but not implemented for lack of means.)
    So much for cultural diversity in France.

    • 0
      2

      “Napoleon was also the one who vigorously implemented the oppressive language policy effectively prohibiting all languages other than French and even dialects other than”

      Banda and Siri Mao were just following a European policy therefore what Banda and Siri Mao did was right.

  • 2
    0

    Prof. CS,

    Thanks for the write up. Never knew this! Thought that Napoleon was the greatest general ever, who was far above racism, and was a great uniter…..(read the book Desiree when I was a teenager). So disappointed and sad to know what he did to Black people.

    • 1
      0

      He would have treated us Lankans very badly.

      • 2
        0

        Napoleon did not even think of invading us.
        How rotten!

        • 1
          1

          “Napoleon did not even think of invading us.”

          Now we have someone who knew exactly what Napoleon was thinking.
          He must be lucky to possess Mao’s b***s.

          “How rotten!”

          How pathetic.

    • 8
      1

      Well, many people who were supposed to be exemplary to their contemporaries tend to show up as racists or murderers on closer inspection. George Washington owned slaves, and fathered children with female ones. Abe Lincoln didn’t exactly believe that black people could ever equal whites. Churchill was no slouch at killing civilians, by starvation or bombing.
      Should we not include our own Anagarika in the list?

  • 0
    0

    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.

    For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2

  • 1
    0

    we have our own churchil here.Who the hell is racist nepolean compared to churchill.

  • 4
    11

    Napoleon’s racism is nothing compared with racism of Tamil politicians in Yapanaya.

    • 1
      1

      EagleEye, I am reminded of a wolf calling the lamb the fiend. You have previously succeeded In hoodwinking the powerful countries. You may still be able to continue doing that while deploying very large number of soldiers in Tamil areas.

  • 1
    1

    Dear Professor Sarvan,
    .
    How much I’ve discovered that I didn’t expect to.
    .
    I knew nothing of his general. although I had read “The Three Musketeers”, “The Count of Monte Christo” and “The Man in the Iron Mask”. Intriguing thought that you may have read them in the very same volumes, many years earlier. And we were shown films of the last two.
    .
    The books have now disappeared; I helped index them all in 1968, now nobody knows where they are. Worse, we don’t know what the future holds in store for us; that was part of my complaint here, yesterday:
    .
    https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/sri-lanka-tamils-no-choice-but-to-join-gotagogama-stay-put-or-go-abroad/
    .
    We learn about the past, but what happens in the future, nobody can be sure of. But what do I do when a Bishop tells me that he will not concern himself with fair play in the future? It was representation on the Board of Governors for those teaching in your old school that I tried to raise his concerns about.
    .
    I, too, was sad to read about the vile treatment that Dumas’ father received at the hands of Napoleon.

  • 1
    0

    I knew this poem,
    .
    https://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/to-toussaint-louverture-2/
    .
    and I knew that the Haitian Revolution came to a sad end.
    .
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guerrillas_(novel)
    .
    The country was not named, but that’s what it had all come to, and it was the closest that I can think of to contemporary Lanka.
    .
    All of this may not be very cheering, but what’s to be done? But I learnt a lot, thanks to this article which tied together so many things that I didn’t know were connected.
    .
    As for Napoleon, Beethoven’s tearing up the title page of the Eroica Symphony in 1804, says it all for me, but I know that account to be anecdotal whereas Professor Sarvan makes strenuous efforts to ensure historical accuracy. He challenges us by setting standards that are difficult to emulate.
    .
    Panini Edirisinhe of Bandarawela

  • 0
    1

    Napoleon was a short man ………. he had to make up for it.

    Usually, in these matters …… the rest around are the losers ……….

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