19 October, 2017

Philip Baldaeus Didn’t See A Big Ethnic Difference In Ceylon

By Laksiri Fernando

Dr. Laksiri Fernando

Both Robert Knox and Philip Baldaeus are important in studying and understanding the history, people and culture of Ceylon in the 17th century, with possible insights for today, but the scholars have so far given less attention to Baldaeus than to Knox for various reasons. Baldaeus was a Protestant Priest who came to the country as a missionary when the Dutch were taking over the Maritime Provinces from the Portuguese. He probably came to Ceylon in 1657 and left the country in 1665. In between, he was also in Malabar and Coromandel for missionary work.

His “A Description of the Great and Most Famous Isle of Ceylon,” of 162 pages and 52 short chapters, was part of a larger work of 829 pages on “Malabar, Coromandel and Ceylon,” published in 1671in Amsterdam, in fact ten years before Robert Knox’s book, and translated and published in English in 1703 from High Dutch. The main focus of the historical description, of course from his official point of view, was Raja Singa II. Nevertheless, it traces the history from the arrival of the Portuguese and gives a fair description of diplomacy and political intrigues and the treatises between the Dutch and the Kandyan King/s. There are also important details about the conventions, state structures and political customs of what he has called the ‘Empire of Ceylon.’ While some of these details might be of interest to political analysts who grapple with the issues of devolution today, the focus of this article is on some of his comments on the Sinhalese, the Tamils and also the Muslims as ethnic or national groups from a reconciliation point of view.

Robert Knox gave an elaborate description of society, family, occupations, customs and religion, among other matters, of what he called the Chingulays (Sinhalese) in his An Historical Relation of the Island of Ceylon in East-Indies (1681) as he was living in Kandy areas for 19 years. He commented on the Tamils or Malabars as he had roamed around some parts of Vanni but he was not well aware of Jafnapatnam. (It should be noted that Malabars is the term many European writers used to describe the Tamils both in South India and Ceylon until the 19th century). This gap is filled by Philip Baldaeus with greater clarity, however, one need to keep in mind that by this time the Jaffna society had largely been Christianised which he admits and explains. Baldaeus lived both in Jaffna and Galle; and in Jaffna he learned Tamil and even translated the Lord’s Prayer into Tamil.

Jafnapatnam

Baldaeus traces the story of Dutch march to Jaffna from Mannar from his own experience, after an interesting chapter on Mannar, and there are four main chapters as a description of Jafnapatnam thereafter. The general description of Jafnapatnam is as follows and I would keep the original old English of these quotations, as much as possible, as it would give a historical flavour to the description.

Jafnapatnam is divided into four Provinces, which are very populous…The whole number of villages amounts to 159, of their own Churches 34…The Provinces of Jafnapatnam are Belligamme,[1] Tenmarache, Waddemarache, and Patchirapalle.” Then he gives the number of churches in each province and how many people attend church and how many school boys. With reference to Belligamme alone he says, “In the year 1665, we had above 1000 school boys, among whom were 480 who could answer all the questions relating to the chief points of our religion.” He describes the Jaffna islands separately. Thereafter, he begins a chapter saying, “It is time to say something of the inhabitants of Jafnapatnam. In Ceylon are divers clans, or families, as well as on the Coast of Coromandel. The generation of the Bellales is the chiefest here since Christianity has been introduced, the Brahmans challenging the first among the Pagans.”

What he called Bellales were the Vellala caste, and Pagans, the Hindus. The description of the Bellales goes as follows.

“They live upon husbandry, and are rich in cattel, such as cows, oxen for the plow, sheep, goats and bufflers. Their habitations are convenient and neat, with pleasant gardens, well planted with Betel, and furnished with excellent springs, which furnish them (during the dry summer season) with water for the watering of gardens…The before mentioned Bellales make likewise butter, but after the same manner as we do in Holland…Butter is in great esteem among them as well as among the Moors, nay the family of Commety use butter like drink. Milk turned to curds (called by them Tayr) is also in great request with them, and used like a cooling medicine in fevers, and the small-pox, which are very frequent here.”

The climate and seasons are described in these pages contrasting with the southern parts of the Island. Most important for the purpose of this article are the descriptions of manners and temperaments of the people. “The Bellales are generally the richest of the country; they don’t marry except in their own family [to mean their own caste]…They are very litigious, and will go to Law for a triffle, because they constantly curious at one another.” The Brahmans are also praised as “Men of great morality, sober, calm, industrious, civil, obliging and very moderate in both eating and drinking.” Marriages of both Bellales and Brahmans are described in detail. The descriptions of Chittiis, Chivias, Parruas, Carreas, Nallouses and Parreas are described in fair detail.

Cingaleses

As stated before, much of the book on Ceylon is devoted to the political history, armed forces, administrative matters, missionary work and theological arguments. Nevertheless, like in the sections on Jafnapatnam, there are descriptions of the Cingaleses in the South and in Candy. The relevant chapter begins as follows.

“Having hitherto taken a view of those people of Ceylon that are under the jurisdiction of the Dutch Company, we will now take a turn to Candy, the Imperial Residence, as the most proper place to be informed concerning the real Constitution of this Isle, and its inhabitants.” But I am most interested in this article are the general descriptions and information about the people. With reference to the main religion, he says, “All over the Isle you see abundance of very splendid Pagodas.” Then he explains in detail several of them and refers to the Buddhist monks in the following manner.

“Their Friers wear yellow habits, with their heads shaven all over, for which reason they never appear in the streets without umbrellos, and beads in their hands, muttering out certain prayers as they go along.” The temples are explained as follows. “Their Convents have diverse galleries and chapels, wherein are placed the statutes of several men and women, who, as they say, have led holy lives. These are adorned with gold and silver apparel, and attended with burning lamps and wax candles day and night, placed upon alters: the candlesticks being supported by naked boys artificially carved. The Friers have their certain hours of prayers, which they perform in these chapels.” The most interesting and perhaps accurate is the description of temple processions.

Like what he said about the Bellales, “In their houses they [Sinhalese] are excessive neat, use instead of trenchards or tablecloths the leaves of fig-trees; their spoons are made of coco-nutshells, and their drinking vessels of earth.”

Comparison of Sinhalese and Tamils

According to Baldaeus “The Cingaleses are in shape and manners not unlike the Malabars, with long handing ears, but not so black.” There are other commonalities that Baldaeus has observed.

“But concerning the religious worship of the Cingaleses we shall have occasion to say more in the following treatise, which in effect differs very little from the Malabars and those of Coromandel, except that they are not altogether such bigots.” This is where he says that the “Emperor of Ceylon allows Liberty of Conscience to all Nations” (p.821). Referring to Wimaladharmsuriya I, Baldaeus has previously said “As he despised all religions, so he allowed the free exercise thereof to all without distinction” (p. 681).

Perhaps there were certain emerging economic differences or occupational specialities between the Tamil areas and the Sinhalese areas. The descriptions give the impression that in Jafnapatnam there were emerging small industries and despite the strict caste system that the people were engaging in them. This is also confirmed by Robert Knox referring to the Vanni and thee road leading to Jaffna from Anuradhapura.

As Baldaeus said “Weavers are in abundance. These sit flat upon the Ground, their feet being placed in a hole dug for that purpose, whilst they are at work.” He also talks about calico-printing and excellent workmen in ivory and ebony wood. “They are well provided with smiths, carpenters and bricklayers. As most places in Europe…,” he says. Although the Sinhalese areas that Baldaeus describes are mainly agricultural, he also mentions the availability of necessary workmanship in gold, silver, ivory, ebony and iron.

Baldaeus has good things to say about both the Sinhalese and the Tamils. Both are described as “naturally active and ingenuous.” There are more similarities and differences that he had talked about. In respect of what they wear, “The Bellales wear a kind of garment from above the navel, turning between the legs like a pair of drawers. They also make use of Seripous (or soles) tied to the bottom of the feet with leather straps…Upon the belly they have a kind of a bag (called Maddi) being part of their garment rolled together, where they keep their Areek and Betel…” (p. 812).

Now in respect of the Sinhala gentlemen, “The dress of the men is a vest called Rapillo, of woolen or linen cloth; their under garment is a piece of linen wrapt about the middle and draw through both their legs, like a pair of breeches.” This is not very dissimilar to what the Bellales wore. But instead of Seripous, “On their heads they wear a kind of red Caps, such as we call Rock Caps,” Baldaeus says. This must be the typical Jata or Sinhala turban.

Marriage customs are more or less the same, but Baldaeus gives an elaborate description of marriage ceremonies in Jafnapatanam perhaps adulterated by the Portuguese influence with singing and dancing and ‘divers other diversions.’ “However, strong liquors are never made use of on such occasions, unless the Hollanders (who can’t well be merry without them) bring some among them” Baldaeus assures! This is not my imagination, but exactly what Baldaeus says in page 816.

Baldaeus could have been prejudiced or even insulting being a ‘White Man,’ some of our critiques might say. In many places, he says, for both the Sinhalese and the Tamils, that “Their general vice is fornication and adultery, especially among the young men, as the old ones are much addicted to superstitions…” (p.817). The following is a full paragraph in this respect where he relates his experience of course prejudiced by his apparent puritanism.

“Incest is so common a vice among them, that when husbands have occasion to leave their wives for some time, they recommend the conjugal duty be performed by their own brothers. I remember a certain woman at Gale, who had confidence enough to complain of the want of duty in her husband’s brother upon that account. The like happened in my time in Jafnapatanam, which had been likely to be punished with death, had not at my intercession, and in regard of the tender beginnings of Christianity, the same been passed by for that time” (p.822).

‘Difference’ in Nutshell

There are two important paragraphs (p. 822) which say all about the so-called differences between the Sinhalese, the Tamils and even the Muslims, which invariably touch on the caste system, gender issues and predicament of the girl child. First is the following.

“The Cingaleses as well as the Malabars are much addicted to the idleness and pleasures, and insist much upon their Pedigree. They marry as many wives as they think fit, as well as the Mahometans, of which there live a considerable number in this Isle. They marry their daughters at 10 or 11 years of age, a custom not to be rooted out among them, they being very fond of the virginity of their wives. They bury their dead after the manner of the Pagans.”

The ‘idleness and pleasures’ are undoubtedly of the upper classes or castes who ‘insist upon their pedigree.’ Otherwise, the country or the economy could not have been functioning. Baldaeus talks much about the predicament and poor living conditions of the so-called lower castes in other descriptions. However, many of the references are of the upper classes of both communities which apparently appear to be the same. In the second paragraph it says:

“Their spoons are made of coconut shells, and their drinking vessels of earth, with hollow pipes, through which they pour (like Moors) the drink into the mouth without touching their lips; for as the Cingaleses and Malabars insist much upon their Noble Descent, for they will neither eat nor drink with those of an inferior rank; nay many of them are so proud as not to eat with their own wives.”

Are we so different today?

This exercise of quoting and mildly interpreting what Philip Baldaeus said was for the benefit of public education, and I leave for the readers to make their own conclusions. Let me thank my ‘new found’ friend Sisira Weragoda for supplying me with necessary material, as I have left most of them back home in this ‘great and most famous Island of Sri Lanka.’ But he is not responsible for any of the errors or views expressed.


[1] It is interesting note that Belligamme is used both for Valikamam in Jaffna and Weligama in the South, both means ‘Sandy Village’ both in Tamil and Sinhalese. The area Patchirapalle could be Puthukudurippu, “the inhabitants being very poor and feeding most generally upon unwholesome diet.” He also says, “As this Province boarder upon Raja Singa’s country, so they are subjected to the incursions of the Cingaleses.”  

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Latest comments

  • 0
    0

    Nice one Prof!
    Baldaeus was referring to the Kandyan practice of POLYANDRY – women having multiple hausband/partners (particularly brothers) which was traditional practice in Lanka, before VICTORIAN COLONIAL values that were prudish were imported to Lanka by the Colonizers with their Christian morality.
    Ironically, today it is the Brits who are considered “loose” and “promiscuous” with spiraling divorce rates and 1 out of 3 children in UK born out of wedlock, which the Tamil and Sinhalay Modayas aspire to Victorian norms of Monogamy – particularly for women!
    The sixties sexual revolution needs to hit Lanka and release the frustrated youth who should be encouraged to be as promiscuous as the youth that Baldaeus describes!

    • 0
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      Dodo the Muzzzzi

      Don’t confuse love and sex with your one night stand ideas.

      If in SL you monkey the west without understanding the women and children would be raped may be 3 fold to the west and the causes are poverty, no discipline, internet age etc.

      UK is correcting the laws that favour marriage than having partner and bringing forth.

      The richer Scandinavians live together but don’t want to have children. In the west the pace of life is overtaking them and they find it difficult to care for offspring the way they would love to. A major portion of gays are because both parents don’t live together.

      When bLiar announced incentives for giving birth to the extra child the first to produce were the introverted Muslims who don’t want to blend so the rise of the far right. The schools hospitals etc. are bursting yet they produce and want their madrasas and some of the schools the whites are extinct. Now the present government is introducing laws to correct that but everyone has to tighten their belts because of especially the ones who have 4 wives by religious law and eat into all the resources but refuse to integrate etc. It’s a vast subject this is not the forum to discuss multiculture.

  • 1
    0

    That was because there were no Tamils in SL at that time. Only Sinhalese and Muslims lived in SL at that time. Tamils were brought to SL from Tamil Nadu after that.

    • 0
      1

      You are nominated for Nobel prize by Ravanaya and BBS for the first animal came with bloody mouth.

    • 0
      1

      They were Lankans of Indian Origin who spoke both Sinhala & Tamil Languages..

    • 0
      0

      Fat “Mama ” Fuk U Shima,

      No Smelly Tart. We came first in a Thoni. But you came after us in a Kalla Thoni.
      But soon there will be a few more million comimng in Genuine Ships as soon as we widen KKS.

      FRIGHTENING isnt it.

      Read the Quoran and Pirith.

      I am sure you now regret why the bloody hell did I chose a Hala Name Fat” Mama” and Fuk U Shima because everbody these days is fuc.ing me.

      You are going to die of exhaustion.

      Why dont you change your name to Sudhuacca.

      But we will catch you from your message which will never change

      Wahabi , Arabic, BBS
      Halal
      Isaipriya
      89,000 widows
      and the lot.

      Why dont you concentrate on the job on hand and that is to trace Gotha who has now been missing for over a month. Poor fellow. I think SF has kidnapped him. I know you had a fling with him in Katchaithivu.
      Yo virile and him Senile it didnt match did it. How sad

  • 0
    0

    In the early fifties,my classmate’s father wore a coat over a shirt,a sarong, and had a ‘konde’ (knot of hair) on the back of his head,and a curbed comb embedded in hair on the top of his head.
    This was the dress of ‘upper class’ sinhalese gentlemen in those days.

  • 0
    0

    Very interesting indeed!

    So Baldaeus probably came to Ceylon in 1657 and left the country in 1665. In between, he was also in Malabar and Coromandel for missionary work.

    It looks as if Tamils were well established in Jaffna .

    I very much like to hear from my former teacher- Prof Nalin De Silva?

    When were Tamils brought in to Jaffna from India for Tobacco Cultivation?

    Over to you Prof Nalin?

    • 0
      0

      Sri,

      It is something that Prof Nalin De Silva invented from thin air. He had never quoted any source. When asked for evidence to prove what he says he goes silence. Please tell your teacher to prove his claim with reliable evidence.

    • 0
      0

      The Dutch historian Predikant Philippus Baldaeus was living in Jaffna during the Dutch period (from 1657 to 1665) and was preaching Christianity in the Tamil language.

      If you read the book written by this Dutch historian Baldaeus, according to him the Tamils were already well established in Jaffna during the Dutch period. If Prof Nalin De Silva says, the Tamils were brought by the Dutch to Jaffna from India for Tobacco Cultivation, definitely Baldaeus being a Dutch living in Jaffna during that period would have mentioned in his book.

      According to Philippus Baldaeus, the Tamils were already living in Jaffna. He has never mentioned anywhere that the Tamils (Malabars) were brought to Jaffna by the Dutch.

      As Dimuthu said, Prof Nalin De Silva must have made up this story. Otherwise, he should bring evidence to prove it.

  • 0
    0

    This is the same as we can’t tell the difference between a Japanese and a Korean or different Africans

    • 0
      0

      Goth-abhaya,

      No Goth-ass we can tell the difference between Tamils & Sinhalese

      Humans & Animals.

      Enjoy the following Goth-ass

      According to the Mahavamsa’s folklore (the chronicled history of Sri Lanka), Sinhabahu’s father was a lion and his mother a princess of Kalinga. His hands and feet were like a lion’s paws.

      When Sinhabahu was sixteen, he escaped with his mother and sister, Sinhasivali, and arrived in the capital of Vanga. He later killed his father for a reward and was offered the throne of Vanga.

      He refused the throne, instead founding the city of Sinhapura, in his native country of Lála. He lived there with Sinhasivali, whom he made his consort. They had thirty-two children, of whom Vijaya was the eldest and Sumitta the second.

  • 0
    0

    abhaya

    “This is the same as we can’t tell the difference between a Japanese and a Korean or different Africans”

    However one can tell the difference between Lankeys and monkeys.

    Latter is much cleverer than the Lankeys.

    • 0
      0

      Oh the honey. PC2 Rip Van Winkle luv that.

    • 0
      1

      Jackass. Tamils are a subspecies of monkeys

      • 0
        0

        Sounds like BBS have got foot and mouth “Poor sole” keep chewing.

      • 0
        0

        Goth-abhaya,

        First of all Jack doesnt have an ass but you do. Goth-ass.

        As for yor other rubbish enjoy the following at my pleasure you Goth-ass.

        According to the Mahavamsa’s folklore (the chronicled history of Sri Lanka), Sinhabahu’s father was a lion and his mother a princess of Kalinga. His hands and feet were like a lion’s paws.

        ***When Sinhabahu was sixteen, he escaped with his mother and sister, Sinhasivali, and arrived in the capital of Vanga. He later killed his father for a reward and was offered the throne of Vanga.

        He refused the throne, instead founding the city of Sinhapura, in his native country of Lála. He lived there with Sinhasivali, whom he made his consort. They had thirty-two children, of whom Vijaya was the eldest and Sumitta the second.

  • 0
    0

    This article is simply about worshipping what was said by the people that you value.

    Otherwise, every oriental looks the same.

    Every aboriginal person looks the same.

    Every caucasian person looks the same.

    We have talked enough that there are some Tamils who were former Sinhalas while there some Sinhalas who were former Tamils.

    It is Like If LAKSIRI FERNANDO goes to Portugal or spain he should look some what like a portuguese or a Spaniard.

    • 0
      0

      Jim Sooty,

      Who are these Sinhalese who were former Tamils?

      You mean Karuna & Douglas Thevanantha

      And the Tamils who were former Sinhalese you meam MR & Gotha
      You might be right you know and that is why MR speaks like Thirugna-sambanthan. I never thought about this

      You ( Jim Soooty)africans look the same.

  • 0
    0

    What is the profound inference one can draw from the multiple quotations from Baldeus? Is the learned Professor wants us to agree that there was no difference in the dress, customs and physiology between Malabars and Cinglese? So what?
    He states that “Belligamme is used both for Valikamam in Jaffna and Weligama in the South, both means ‘Sandy Village’ both in Tamil and Sinhalese”.
    Valikamam has been derived from ‘Weligama’ the name of a Sinhalese settlement in ancient Jaffna peninsula.
    The Tamil term for sandy I believe is ‘manal’, for example Manal Aru for Weli Oya.
    I hope that more knowledgeable linguists/historians could enlighten the Professor.

    • 0
      0

      Vichara

      “Valikamam has been derived from ‘Weligama’ the name of a Sinhalese settlement in ancient Jaffna peninsula.
      The Tamil term for sandy I believe is ‘manal’, for example Manal Aru for Weli Oya.”

      You ought to be able to see beyond your nose if you want these names to make any sense.

      “I hope that more knowledgeable linguists/historians could enlighten the Professor”

      On the surface your comment makes one to presume you are an enlightened soul. You need to seriously consider swallowing your own medicine before advising others.

      Read the following and make up your own mind:

      Valikaamam
      வலிகாமம்
      valikāmam

      vali+kaamam

      The sandy village.

      Vali Sand (Eezham Tamil place names); Vaal: Whiteness, purity, goodness (Tamil, Dravidian Etymological Dictionary 5364); Vaal-ekkar: White sand of the seashore or riverbank (Tamil, Changkam Diction); Vaalukaa: Sand, gravel (Sanskrit); Vaalukaa, Vaaluaa (Prakrit); Vaalukam: White sand (old Tamil lexicons); Vælla, Væli: Sand, sandy place (Sinhala); Veli: Sand (Dhivehi / Maldivian); Paal: Milk, known for whiteness (Dravidian Etymological Dictionary 4096); Pal: Tooth, known for whiteness (Dravidian Etymological Dictionary 3986)
      Kaamam Village, large village, cultivation village (Eezham Tamil place names); Kamam: Cultivation land (Eezham Tamil); Kamak-kaaran: Cultivator, owner of cultivation land (Eezham Tamil); Gam, Gama: Village (Sinhala); Graama: An inhabited place, village, hamlet (Sanskrit); Gaama: A collection of houses, a hamlet, a parish or village having houses and distinct from the surrounding country (Prakrits); Gang and in sentences, Gamung, Gamah, Gamuge: Island, land, village, hamlet, domicile (Dhivehi / Maldivian)

      In today’s Sinhalese, veli means sand. In old Tamil, vaal is an adjective meaning white and a synonym of paal. In Changkam diction, vaal ekkar is white sand dunes or sandy streches. Vaalukam is another word used for white sand in classical texts such as Chilappathikaaram.

      Kaamam in Sri Lankan Tamil is a cognate of graama in Sanskrit. Kiraamam is another Tamil derivate of the word. While gama is the cognate in Sinhala and in some of the Prakrits such as Pali, it has become kaamam in Sri Lankan Tamil. Also note that the word kamam for cultivation land, is yet another derivate.

      The usage of the word Valikaamam as an important place name is found in the Chola inscriptions of 12th Century A.D. It could perhaps be a synonym for ma’natti or ma’nal thidar (sandy stretch) by which the Jaffna peninsula was known.

      The etymology of Valikaamam is a good example to understand the shared elements in Tamil and Sinhala languages.

      Valikaamam which might have origninated as a name of a village, became the name of a region in the Jaffna peninsula. Today, it is devided into five administrative divisions, Valikaamam North, Valikaamam South, Valikaamam East, Valikaamam West and Valikaamam Southwest.

      http://www.tamilnet.com/art.html?catid=98&artid=22470

      • 0
        0

        Foreign,

        You fool.This is what Valikaamam Means

        Valikamam translates to “the sandy village” in English. It is derived from the Tamil words vali (sand) and kamam (village).

        Where did the bloody “Weligama ” come from. Stop talking rubbish and you are now begining to annoy me with your tiny brain as I am struggling to catch up with your stupidity.

        • 0
          0

          kali – stani

          Stupid man go read my original comment.

          Read the following and make up your own mind:

          Valikaamam
          வலிகாமம்
          valikāmam

          vali+kaamam

          The sandy village.

  • 0
    0

    pachirapalla is pachilaipallain the area from mugamalai to elephant pass.
    it has poor sandy soil.but water table is 15 feet.only coconut and palmera can be cultivated.

  • 0
    0

    Those who have studied Sandesayas specially Salalihini Sandesaya knows that any Tamil or other Indian settlements were always destroyed by the Sinhalese and those who were left became part of the Sinhala community.

    Tamils and other Indian in Sri Lanka are not different to other Indian colonial parasites in the former British-Indian Empire, now the Indian Empire.

    Tamils and other Indians in Sri Lanka are the only group of people in the world who claims that they lived there for thousands of years and have the same culture, language, religion and life practices of the people 12 miles across the sea.

    There are no Europeans in England who have claims like this. During the Thirteenth Century the Administrative language of England was French. England is 12 miles across the sea from Europe.

  • 0
    0

    The word “ethnic” is a modern day word to describe people who have settled in a country after another lot of recent settlers. Example are Indians in Canada and Australia.

    The Tamils and other Indians in Ceylon came on the back of the British like the Indians in Fiji, Mauritius, South Africa etc. They are the Indian colonial parasites of the former British Indian Empire now the Indian empire.
    The most celebrated Indian colonial parasite is Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi who made his economic and political fortunes from South Africa.

    • 0
      0

      Nalani Bandara

      “The Tamils and other Indians in Ceylon came on the back of the British like the Indians in Fiji, Mauritius, South Africa etc. They are the Indian colonial parasites of the former British Indian Empire now the Indian empire.”

      Are you sure about what you have typed above?

      “The most celebrated Indian colonial parasite is Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi who made his economic and political fortunes from South Africa.”

      Are you sure about what you have typed above?

      • 0
        0

        Thanks for understanding what I said. Hon UNHCR Ms Navi Paillai is another well known colonial parasite from South Africa.

        Well you know Malaya, Singapore and Burma are much close places that was colonized by Indian colonial parasites under the British flag.

        The so called British Empire was in fact a British -Indian Empire. All Indians are grateful to the British for making India. there was no India before the British made India.

        • 0
          0

          Nalani Bandara

          The Tamils colonised many countries.

          They colonised my island as well.

          The colonising, Bengali, Bihari, Gujarati, Malayalees, Portuguese, Dutch, British,Malays,…Tamils and others now have mutated into Sinhalese.

          Isn’t it a wonder?

          The point is I don’t want any of you the descendants of Kallathonies here in my ancestral land.

  • 0
    0

    Dr

    There is huge ethnic difference in Sri Lanka which is a historical fact .

    Humans and
    Half Animal ( Lion) and Half Human

    Tamils are Human

    Sinhalese are Half Animal & Half Human and if in doubt check it out.
    If you want more poof just look at the animal behaviour.The Sinhalese race kill for a living. Human beings kill to survive like we fought the Sinhalese Animals the Army.

    ****According to the Mahavamsa’s folklore (the chronicled history of Sri Lanka), Sinhabahu’s father was a lion and his mother a princess of Kalinga. His hands and feet were like a lion’s paws.

    When Sinhabahu was sixteen, he escaped with his mother and sister, Sinhasivali, and arrived in the capital of Vanga. He later killed his father for a reward and was offered the throne of Vanga.

    He refused the throne, instead founding the city of Sinhapura, in his native country of Lála. He lived there with Sinhasivali, whom he made his consort. They had thirty-two children, of whom Vijaya was the eldest and Sumitta the second.

    • 0
      0

      kali – istani

      “Tamils are Human”

      However Rama your Hindu god hired Monkey brigade to invade this island instead of Tamil warriors. He didn’t have faith in Tamil’s abilities.

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