24 September, 2018

Blog

Ranil’s Tough Line Deserves Watchful Support

By Kumar David

Prof. Kumar David

Prof. Kumar David

The public has been haranguing the government for not prosecuting corrupt and criminal politicos (of whatever regime), not acting firmly against racist provocateurs and not pulling up slack government servants to enhance the quality of state services. If this is the grouse then strong action is justified and nobody should complain if the Prime Minister breaks a few eggs to make an omelette – there are good reasons to be cautious in supporting tough governments because Lee Kwan Yue like experiences have been mixed blessings, but more on that some other time.

Demonstrations of public outrage at malfeasance is abundant in print, electronic media, TV and is a prime topic of every social conversation. The antidote was well stated in a letter to the Island (19 February) by reader DEMOS: “If the law of the land is enforced equitably, and where breaches of the law occur, justice is meted out strictly without fear or favour, the majority of people will be happy in the knowledge that they can live with dignity and with an assured sense of security ”. Very good, but enforcing the law with equity, putting an end to racial incitement and that ensuring public servants work in proportion to their remuneration, provokes vengeance from law breakers, racists and slackers. These eggs need to be broken if Mr Demos is to enjoy his nourishing omelette.

Ranil WickAllow me to muse on these themes from the perspective of a leftist and dwell on what the left should be doing but falling short. I expended time seeking leftist reactions to the question “What should our relationship to the Ranil Wickremesinghe government be?” The reply fell not into a wide spectrum, but into two sharply dichotomous positions. The Better-Left, for want of a name, consisting of the LSSP Majority Faction (Lal Wijenayake, Jayampathi, Vijaya Kumar), left-liberal intellectuals and Tamils said: ‘Responsible Cooperation’. ‘Responsible’ is an issue based approach – there will at times be disagreements. ‘Cooperation’ means now is a not-to-be-wasted opportunity to collaborate with the government for both positive purposes, and no less important, to defeat racism that has not been entirely eradicated, 8 January and 17 August notwithstanding. Others, such as Siritunga’s United Socialists, ex-Maoists and some civil society organisations e.g. those led by Jehan, Nimalka and Pakiasorthy, also belong to the responsible but not unconditional collaborator block. The JVP is tied up in knots of its own making and has managed to get both feet into its mouth.

The other side of the dichotomy is exemplified by the Dead-Left – or Dead & Buried (D&B) – consisting of the LSSP minority, the CP and Vasu’s DLF. Frontline Socialists (a JVP breakaway sliver) also belong indirectly to an ‘overthrow this government and bring back Mahinda’ agenda. The D&B’s theoretical fig-leaf is ‘Mahinda is pro-people; the present government pro-imperialist’. This is farcical. The Rajapaksa gang’s anti-Western posture was to save its skin from war-crimes prosecution, its tilt to China to collect booty from Chinese companies, and as for socialism, I sincerely don’t see what’s socialist about that regime’s programme during its two terms of office.

The Better-Left

The Better-Left I can identify with but the pity is that it’s not deeply involved in mass action. Lal is doing a great job with public consultation on the constitution and Jayampathi will be on the drafting body, but still isn’t it a disgrace that the left needs, albeit open-minded, liberals to lead the fight against chauvinism? What a goddamn shame; it’s not the left, but Ranil Wickremesinghe and Mangala Samaraweera who are the most prominent spokesmen denouncing racism today!

Some in the Better-Left are handicapped by sectarianism; they manifest the negative side of Trotskyism and do not understand that nurturing a broad-left should be their main task. Ranil does not need their help to mobilise the liberal class, he can do it better himself; the tactical need today is for another separate vanguard on the left flank of society. Is this difficult to grasp? It has not penetrated some pro-Ranil left sectarians on whom the importance of broad-left mobilisation has not dawned. Ranil is willing to grasp opportunity: His “Hit-to-see; if you want to fight, let’s fight” is the right frame of mind and is waking up liberals who have long been grumbling about inertia.

Now cut the crap that the left is in decline globally and our predicament is normal. Heard of Jeremy Corbyn? Heard of Bernie Saunders? The world is changing, Lanka will change; how soon depends on our clarity and purposefulness. What is indisputable is that young people, the next generation, in the West is vibrant and the working class in the US is following in its wake – in the UK trade unions were one driver of Corbyn’s rise to leadership.

I took the initiative of bringing Corbyn to the notice of Lankan readers when he was derided by the British media as a dead loser; the UK media is a lot more sanguine now. The Guardian (15 February) carried a piece by Freddie Sayers, editor in chief of YouGov, which said: “In both cases (Corbyn and Saunders) a key enabler has been the detoxifying of leftwing ideas. The word socialism itself has become acceptable again, and to the millennial generation it has more to do with Swedish sunshine than Soviet gloom. A recent YouGov study in the US revealed that 18- to 29-year-olds are the only group that overtly favours the term. But there are significant minorities in the older generations that also favour the concept – and they add up”.

The PM has taken the fight to the GMOA and the press. I have not yet studied ETCA and will take it up next week; in principle internationalism and collaboration with India are good. In respect of the press it is true that (a) much of it, not excluding the Daily Mirror and Dirana, was a Mahinda tail-wager and that (b) to this day contributes little to foster pluralism, devolution or imaginative and constructive inputs to the development discourse. Sure I have reservations re- the government’s reliance on a capitalist development strategy with no grounding in the guiding role of the state. This contradicts even models of successful Asian capitalism, South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore.

However this piece is not about whether the left can collaborate with the UNP on economic policy; it is about the political programme that has come to the forefront – constitution, devolution, pulverising chauvinism, and a framework for all-round development. The extended common ground is welfare (education and health), and a functional public service, not class fundamentals. I do not seek commonality with the UNP on socialism, capitalism or any other –isms. First things first; at this time of peril secure democracy first; maybe our ways will part after that.

Ranil as populist

Life never ceases to surprise and some things the PM has said recently are not consonant with the image I have carried over the years. His punch lines at the World Bank Research function were quite un-Ranilish. Here are the choice ones: “The rich have got richer the poor become poorer”; “The bottom 80% pay 80% of taxes and the economy’s weight is borne by the masses”; “I think we require a capital tax”. I rubbed my eyes in disbelief; I was used to this sort of thing from NM, but Ranil!

But there are three inconsistencies. First this is inconsistent with the government’s budget proposals which are not poor-friendly but intended to spur capitalist growth in anticipation, I presume, of a trickle down effect. Reducing the income tax ceiling to 15% and inducements to entrepreneurs, do not resonate with the PM’s pro-poor talk; somebody is taking somebody for a ride! The imbalance of expected revenue and envisaged state spending is a second discrepancy. Who will pay? Economists are not good at expressing themselves; when tongue-tied they borrow from the civil engineering argot. So they have “structural” problems, which apart from this imbalance, refers to low investment, skills deficiency and weak institutions.

This brings me to the third defect. I have been pushing for a development and industrialisation programme; Make-in-Lanka to dovetail into what is turning out to be a big Make-in-India push. My pleas are falling on deaf ears, like my Single-Issue Common-Candidate concept which was ignored for two years. I don’t see how the PM is going to get anywhere resource-wise, unless he aggressively points in a chosen direction. I repeat, Lanka must cash in on India’s potential boom and I am inclined to view ETCA through this prism.

Ranil’s purported populism raises interesting prospects that I leave you to mull over for the rest of the week. Let us take a dim view of the PM; let us hypothesise that his populism does not come from the heart; that for him it is unfamiliar territory. Territory he is venturing into because he needs allies among progressive sections of society to defeat chauvinist monsters and the Rajapaksa rump and to overcome colossal inefficiency in the state. To do the second of these he needs a deal with the working class; to do both he needs a wider alliance.

Now, there is something called momentum. One can have allies, make commitments, set wheels in motion, and having used erstwhile collaborators, ditch them, saying “Thank you very much” and go the other way. History has many such examples; but history also has many counter examples where momentum could not be reversed and change followed upon change. It all depended on how the specifics unfolded. For now let us not ask for too much and work towards the ‘merely’ democratic tasks I enumerated previously. Let us also keep our eyes open, ready to cross whatever bridge, in whatever direction, when it becomes necessary to do so.

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Latest comments

  • 2
    11

    The unintended irony, and the best evidence of the utter inaccuracy, of Kumar David’s projection and prescription is the caption of the main political column on the editorial page of this Sunday’s ‘Ceylon Today’: “President Outraged at Mangala”.

    New battle lines, polarizations and scenarios are emerging, a la 2004.

    • 5
      0

      There are some differences from 2004:

      1. USA is positioning people where they want in the North and South.

      2. India is for the first time relegated to a Tactical position as opposed to Strategic. Their Strategic options are limited for immediate future at least.

      3.Polarisation amongst the Sinhalese is real unlike 2004 and it will only grow as there is no likelihood of a rapprochement. The split is fundamental, on the future course of the Island as well as at an individual level.

      4. There is a disconnect between what is on the Table and what the Tamil Polity would like. This means a disrupting factor will continue. The West will dangle War Crimes, HR, Genocide etc like they did Peace Talks during LTTE era.

      5. I would say though there is no serious armed insurgency in South Asia; this is the most volatile era since the 1980s and worse in many ways. Something will give in.

      Given the above, I don’t see any planned (serious) development in the economy, politics/constitution or foreign policy.

    • 6
      1

      Dayan,

      The word ‘ Seems’ has been used extensively in the Colombo Today report. Which means much speculation about the ‘Outrage’. Many apparently want a rift within the government, to capitalize on.

      Dr.Rajasingham Narendran

      • 0
        0

        Dr RN, Agnos and others,

        “The public has been haranguing the government for not prosecuting corrupt and criminal politicos (of whatever regime), not acting firmly against racist provocateurs and not pulling up slack government servants to enhance the quality of state services.”

        I hope that you have been following the latest news about NPCs provincial minister for agriculture. If there now is even public suspicion of alleged corruption why is this man not investigated by FDIC and Precifac? Is the amount of 40 million not enough or is the problem still that there is no written complaint?

        Wigneswaran was supposed to investigate but it looks like he now wants to forget all the complaints against the infamous minister. I am referring to the NPC resolution and the “counter resolution attempt” by the CM.

        Another problem is that only Tamil media has noted what is going on.

        Also the water demonstration of last Friday in Jaffna was not noted in the main stream media or was it?

        • 0
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          Dirty Hari,
          I haven’t been following the NPC
          issues after the resolution against
          Aingaranesan was passed. He should resign.
          I read about the water protest on Tamilwin, but
          haven’t had time to check if the fears expressed
          are scientifically valid.

          • 1
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            Agnos,

            “I read about the water protest on Tamilwin, but haven’t had time to check if the fears expressed are scientifically valid.”

            The R/O plan I have seen was about using sea water as raw water and pumping the refuse water back to the sea. I don’t know how this would harm ground water.

          • 1
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            Agnos,

            “I haven’t been following the NPC issues after the resolution against Aingaranesan was passed. He should resign.”

            He should resign and be investigated because of alleged corruption involving 40 million.

            It is interesting that instead of investigating the CM now wants to remove the resolution calling for an investigation. According to the CM Aingaranesan has provided an acceptable explanation.

            “Though the Northern Provincial Council (NPC) earned a name for passing a record number of resolutions in the recent past, this week the councillors were at loggerheads when Chief Minister C.V. Wigneshwaran moved a resolution against a resolution that had already been passed.

            He claimed that the reason for submitting his own resolution was that one of the provincial ministers had been falsely accused of corruption charges. At a previous council sitting, a resolution was passed against Ponnuthurai Ayngaranesan, Minister of Agriculture and Agrarian Services. The resolution made eleven corruption charges against him.

            The council decided that there should be a full probe. The resolution alleged that the minister was involved in a fraud amounting to Rs. 40 million. This week, Chief Minister Wigneswaran moved a resolution requesting the council to remove the earlier resolution from the council’s Hansard since he believed the allegations were baseless. Mr. Wigneswaran informed the council that the minister had written a letter, explaining the issues and as Chief Minister he had a right to intervene.

            The debate over the Chief Minister’s resolution went on for two hours. There were heated arguments between two factions.
            One of the councillors quipped that the council sittings had become like an “Indian mega serial drama” — a never ending action-packed episode.

            The debate on the resolution ended without a decision like in the teledramas.”

            http://www.sundaytimes.lk/160228/columns/mega-teledrama-in-npc-serial-row-over-corruption-charges-184728.html

            • 0
              0

              Thanks for the details. I am a bit too busy to get into details, so will see later, but if the info is true, I agree with you.

    • 6
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      Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

      How about Ranil appointing you as Foreign Minister.

      Will you take Sri Lanka from St Petersburg to Vladivastock and to Beijing or a big drive from Toothukudi to London and then a fight to Washington?

      What did you do as Ambassador in Paris. It is like the history of Paris bread revolution when people were demonstrating in front of the Palace for bread Marie Antoinette helped provoked the people by asking why can’t they eat cake instead.

      When Sri Lanka was burning you were in your dream world pen pushing all kinds of stuffs like Marie Antoinette.

      Please take a back seat think of correcting your failures.

  • 1
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    The Corbyn and Sanders phenomenon is something new and positive and hopefully it will re-instill progressive thinking in the minds of people even in Sri Lanka, especially among the youth.
    Sengodan. M

  • 3
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    Prof. Kumar David,

    “criminal politicos (of whatever regime), not acting firmly against racist provocateurs and not pulling up slack government servants to enhance the quality of state services”

    Well, well, waiting and Waiting, until the corrupt guys die of old age.

    • 1
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      Don’t wait for the corrupt to die. In this thrice blessed country, with the passing of each corrupt guy of old age, a thousand others will fight to fit into the vacuum. And the most corrupt of the thousand will fill the void. And it will go on.

  • 8
    1

    Good advice (and explanation), Kumar.

    It looks like Ranil is one of the few we could depend on to straighten out the mess (somewhat), and deserves our support to do it.

    He should, however, temper his arrogance and take a more even approach when defending his views.

    Too bad that he has that ‘Mahendran’ albatross weighing him down!

  • 4
    0

    Development and industrialisation, cannot proceed unless chauvinism riddance,corrupt slackers and law breakers are dealt with. That has to be the first priority if the momentum for change set in motion on 8th January .2015 is to gain traction. There will be difficult choices to make. The official recognition of the joint opposition has caused the wheels of change set in motion on the said date to spin at the same spot and risks getting stuck there if the rut becomes deep.
    This is the scenario presented currently with the GMOA and unemployed graduates are being activated against the ECTA coupled with Indian fish poaching in the seas off SL.
    Unless the government comes up with a plan of action to deal with the said issues there is not going to be any progress
    .it is here at this point that the Better-left can assert it’s influence and play a vital role.

  • 10
    0

    Ranil is best suited to lead this country to become the “wonder of Asia”He is doing a magnificent job . If Ranil fails in his efforts this country is doomed. Who is there who can brush shoulders with top leaders of the World and clear Sri Lanka’s distorted image prevalent during the last regime except Ranil.He is dedicated to serve the country and his integrity and honesty is beyond doubt,
    It is sad that certain sections of the media carry on a campaign against Ranil for their own selfish ends and by that process these media outlets care a tuppence for the nation’s developments.
    The Nation is duty bound to give him all the support and anyone sabotaging his efforts could be classified as being unpatriotic.
    Sri Lanka should be grateful to Ranil Wickremasinghe for taking the lead for his country and if we are sincere in developing our country Ranil is the best person to lead from the front.
    President Maithripala Sirisena is too doing his part of international diplomacy as the warm reception he received in Germany and Austria clearly indicate.
    The combination of the President and PM is a perfect blend who jointly has made close friendship with Europe,US,China,India,Russia making Sri Lanka a friendly nation in the world arena unlike the previous regime who put all eggs in one basket by only wooing China and antagonising the other super economic powers

    • 0
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      Good comment.

  • 6
    3

    “The combination of the President and PM is a perfect blend who jointly has made close friendship with Europe,US,China,India,Russia making Sri Lanka a friendly nation in the world arena unlike the previous regime who put all eggs in one basket by only wooing China and antagonising the other super economic powers”, so you say Colin.

    If MR antagonized them (but actually obeyed the imperialist edict in national economic policy, privatizing state investments and restructuring social services) only by his China policy (actually, also Iran policy, Zimbabwe policy and Libya policy among others), will Yahapalanaya be the point of concurrence of the rivals, Europe,US,China,India and Russia?
    Is there no risk of the country becoming the battleground for hegemony (really between the US and India, in the long run, as China so far has no record of sending troops or having military bases abroad)?
    Yahapalanya started on the wrong footing with China but beat a retreat, in the face of economic reality, much to the embarrassment of Mangala S and Harsha deS, and secret satisfaction of MS and many SLFPers.

    Yahapalanaya has no plans to solve anything and will solve nothing.
    It will certainly sell the country to foreigners and plunge it into even greater darkness than the 17-years’ long Dharmishta Samajaya and by the Chandrika and MR regimes.

    • 5
      0

      SJ,

      How about Tibet and the occupation of territory in India? How about the islands near the Philipines?

      Dr.RN

    • 3
      0

      SJ,

      Like the late Shanmugathasan, who wrote a memoir as an ‘unrepentant’ Marxist, you seem to have a blinkered view of China. China’s aggressive posture on Tibet and Taiwan, its claim of exclusive rights to disputed islands in the South China Sea–causing rupture with countries like Vietnam, the Philippines, Japan and South Korea, its dismissal of human rights–whether within China or in other countries like Sri Lanka and in Africa–are all factors that people like you are in denial of.

      The West might sometimes use human rights for economic and strategic advantage, but the commitment to human rights in their societies in general is real, because in the post-religious, secular world, people’s values are not based on religion, but on other things, including human rights. ( Yes, though Christians are in the majority, the thought leaders and scientists, the movers and shakers are largely secular, though their culture was shaped by Judeo-Christian values. Europe is even more secular than America, where evangelicals are in large numbers.)

      On the whole, Sri Lanka is better off going with the open societies model, albeit with safeguards against untrammeled capitalism and safety nets for the poor and the marginalized. Sri Lanka should not seek to emulate Singapore, but should at least catch up with countries like India and Malaysia on certain measures where it lags behind them.

      • 0
        1

        Agnos

        One calling another blinkered should first remove one’s own blinkers.

        I have been highly critical of China on many issues. But China’s conduct of its international relations has thus far been principled. That is one of the few positive things about capitalist China.
        (Also see response to RN).

        “The West might sometimes use human rights for economic and strategic advantage, but the commitment to human rights in their societies in general is real…”
        In the past two decades I have not seen worse cynicism than the use of ‘human rights’ to push selfish and aggressive agendas (like R2P).
        The Tamil nationalists were taken for a thundering ride on ‘human rights’, the stick now used rather gently on the present Sri Lankan regime.
        Societies may believe in human rights (and about their violation) as fed by the media, but seldom rise in protest if ‘national security’ is said to be ‘threatened’.

        “Europe is even more secular than America”: You cannot be serious.
        What do we see in Europe these days? Not a surge of fascism — secular fascism I guess?

        • 0
          0

          SJ,

          China’s international relations principled? You must be on another planet.

          R2P is actually good when used correctly–it was based on the guilt felt by the West in not preventing the Ruwandan genocide of one tribal group by another, and I would applaud it when used correctly, but I don’t expect unrepentant communists to agree with it.

          My assertion of secularism in Europe is based on surveys on religious beliefs; people in countries like the Netherlands, Sweden, France and UK are much less religious than in America. Their churches became empty a long time ago, while American evangelical churches are still full. And the Europeans have had more social welfare systems than in the US, and were more accommodating of Middle Eastern Muslims until recently.

          The fascists in Europe–in places like Austria, Hungary, France and Germany– are growing in numbers in response to growing terrorism from Al Qaeda and ISIS allied Islamic groups from within Europe, and the large number of Middle Eastern refugees overwhelming their generous welfare systems at a time of economic uncertainty and rising unemployment.

          • 0
            1

            Agnos

            Far more principled than any in the West. It is based on non-interference in the internal affairs of other nations. (That is another planet for imperialist faithfuls.)

            Kindly advise me where R2P was used “correctly”?
            I wait for the day it is used “correctly” to thus “repent and be converted to the faith so that my sins may be blotted out”.

            “The fascists in Europe–in places like Austria, Hungary, France and Germany– are growing in numbers in response to growing terrorism from Al Qaeda and ISIS allied Islamic groups from within Europe, and the large number of Middle Eastern refugees overwhelming their generous welfare systems at a time of economic uncertainty and rising unemployment.” — Agnos

            Yours is a very poor apology for modern day European fascism.
            European fascism, tired of attacking Jews, always targetted immigrants:
            FN (ed by Jean-Marie Le Pen) made headway in the 1980s on the question of immigration (North Africans) not Muslim fundamentalism.Turks and Kurds have for decades been targetted in Germany; British neo-fascism of various shades had little to do with “terrorism”. Their target shifted from West Indians to Asians long ago. Golden Dawn in Greece had nothing to do with any Islamic terrorism — they are the terrorists.

            “Neo-fascists took responsibility for the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995; a series of bombings in Germany in the 1990s targeting immigrants; and several bombings in London in 1999 against racial minorities and homosexuals.” (http://people.howstuffworks.com/fascism-movement4.htm)
            There is plenty more credible stuff on the Internet.

            Islamic terrorism (patented in the USA and distributed by Saudi Arabia did not strike the West until 9/11. (There too doubts exist about the origin of the attackers.) There was no Islamic terrorism active in Europe until in response to the mischief of Charlie Hebdo in France, again not a systematic thing.
            Where are the recruitment centres of ISIS fighters? Why do they not strike soft targets in Europe? Why France and no other country? There is much to examine. I do not have a simple answer like fascism surges “in response to growing terrorism”.

            Fascism has a class interest and a class base and uses genuine grievances of the people.
            Europe is in an economic mess.

            Try starting there to find a better but less easy answer.

            • 0
              0

              I know about Timothy McVeigh, the Oklahoma City bomber. He was part of a small group–a handful of people–opposed to any government interference in private lives. For the OKC bombing he was executed. There was no tolerance for men like him. The Southern Poverty Law Center as well as the FBI monitor such hate groups, and there are hundreds of such small groups but they are all drawn from the poor and powerless sections of white communities. Law enforcement largely keeps them under control. You are exaggerating their power. Bye.

              • 0
                0

                Agnos

                I was only citing a source not adding anything.
                My comment all along was mainly on contemporary European fascism, and you now seem to agree with me on that.

                Great.
                Thanks.

                Good Bye and Sweet R2P Dreams.

    • 1
      0

      RN

      China sending troops into Tibet is as legitimate as SL sending troops into Jaffna and more legitimate than India sending into Kashmir, Nagaland, Manipur and Sikkim.
      No state in the world (including India, the US ans UK) denied that Tibet was part of China.

      China has not invaded another country but only asserted its claims on what it has claimed historically. One may disagree or dispute the claim, but asserting one’s claim is not invasion. China has historically sought negotiated settlements and will not be dragged into conflict, despite US prompted provocation.

      Occupation of Indian territory: You seem to need some lessons in history. Kindly read AJ Noorani (in the Frontline, accessible on the net) and the Australian-British author Neville Maxwell among others.

      If you like to have it your way go ahead and search among your favourite translator-commentators of Manu.

      Byeee!

      • 0
        0

        SJ

        Tibet was an independent country and did not pose a threat to China. The situations you cite are within the borders of a State. Claims apart, the military intervention by China was unjustified. The State sponsored migration of Chinese into Tibet, subsequently, was a crime. the strangling of the Tibetan culture, was even a greater crime.

        Dr.RN

        • 0
          0

          You seem desperate.
          Please take a break (as in “Have a break, have a KitKat!”), and then get some lessons on the History of China and Tibet– be careful, not from the self-proclaimed authorities on Manu.

          Otherwise, ask someone who KNOWS HISTORY when Tibet was last recognized as an “independent country” and why no one– even the most hostile USA –denied that Tibet was part of China.

  • 5
    0

    Quite realistic under the circumstances. Ranil with his credibility provides the much required balance. Bensen

  • 1
    0

    Our politicians are no less trustworthy than the bunch in the UK. This is how a member of the second chamber in Britain claims he got in.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/big-issue-founder-john-bird-says-he-got-into-the-house-of-lords-by-lying-cheating-and-stealing-a6899646.html

  • 1
    0

    Ranil, “Heard of Jeremy Corbyn? Heard of Bernie Saunders? The world is changing.” If you continue to stick to your neo-liberal agenda and try to push it down the throat of the public silencing the media, then you are going to miss the bus this time too.

    • 1
      0

      kk

      I am sorry for being bit thick, what is Ranil’s neo-liberal agenda, was never able to get around to learn about it.

      Why is it bad for the country?

  • 0
    0

    I hope that your next article will be on the blackout. Thanks.

  • 2
    0

    I am sure KD aware of this motto ‘You cant make an omelette without breaking eggs’was sometime attributed to Stalin (may be wrongly!). LTTE used similar ethos to justify their brutality.people have to be vigilant and collective voice of the people should be strengthen to give ‘responsible cooperation’. they can be optimistic, but have to play their responsible role to make sure what is cooking is an omelette and its been cooked properly.

    Deluded JVP, although they show some progress recently, played a big role in destroying the better left of the nation. They still remain confused or deliberately contradict their genuine thoughts. progressive solution to national question still beyond their radar. Only by taking courageous bold decision to identify them as genuine left they can help the country. no one wish them to become D&B.

    • 0
      0

      “Deluded JVP……, they still remain confused or deliberately contradict their genuine thoughts”
      The JVP was a tool used to destroy the traditional old left by infiltration, and now it’ s side kick the Frontline Socialist is being used to contradict and confuse it by keeping Kumar Gunaratnam in remand at tax payers expense instead of deporting him for breach of visa conditions, while taking into custody those deported from Aus. for failing asylum claim down under.
      It is not for nothing that ex-auditor Mayadunne declined his JVP national list MP ship he must have valid reasons.

  • 3
    0

    “One can not be outspoken if he is not totally honest”. It seems Ranil is getting more and more popular among people after his recent utterances. President Sirisena hasn’t shown that quality as yet. His approach will never succeed in the long run. It looks like although Ranil wants to have a good relationship with the president, the president’s utterances are sometimes cruel. For example: Being the 1st citizen of the country he should not have said that “Ranil after playing cricket at Royal college Colombo became the prime minister while he after playing Elle with village folks at Polonnaruwa became the President”. This shows that Sirisena has a huge inferiority complex and as a result has become so proud after being elected as the president by sheer chance.
    Ranil should not have given him that chance at all.

  • 0
    2

    WATCHFUL SUPPORT FOR DICTATORSHIP?MAY GOD SAVE OUR COUNTRY FROM THESE EVIL ELEMENTS……….PEOPLE SHOULD TALK WITH OPEN MIND FOR THE SAKE OF HUMANITY…….TO CONTINUE THE PEACE WE HAVE ACHIVED AFTER A BRUTAL MURDEROUS WAR … BUT WITH A TERRORISING PRIME MINISTER……..WHAT IT HAVE BEEN OBSERVED IS THAT THIS COUNTRY GOING INTO A DARK ERA…….PEOPLE FOLLOWING THE LEADERS OF THE COUNTRY SPREADING HATRED AND COMING OUT WITH THE OTHER SIDE OF THE STORY…….BY THIS YOU ARE SETTING EACH OTHER AGAINST……IF YOU HAVE NOTHING TO TALK BETTER KEEP YOUR FOUL MOUTH SHUT……..FOR THE WELL BEING OF THE HUMANITY….ON THESE MATTERS NOBODY OTHER THAN GOD CAN HELP US >>>>>>>>>>MAY THE GOD THE FATHER ALMIGHTY HELP US.

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