Six Inches Or Six Yards

Filed under: Colombo Telegraph,MORE OPINION,Opinion |

By Thisuri Wanniarachchi

Thisuri Wanniarachchi

I never quite understood it; the logic behind the expectations of Sri Lankan women to wear sarees to work. In a country with humid weather, insane traffic, over populated public transport infested with casual sexual harassment, women are expected to wear six yards of cloth that plump them up and often expose their belly and back, to work. Men, on the other hand, can wear the “western” formal clothing, trousers, shirt, and/or tie. Nobody ever asked them to reciprocate and wear the national outfit; a convenient double standard, because, patriarchy. Some women rock the saree, it empowers them and they choose to wear it with pride. Hell, for some women in many parts of our country wearing a saree to work is an honor, a sign that they’ve made it, gotten a job that requires them to live up to the expectations of the average Sri Lankan professional woman. But just because some women choose to wear it, to assume that all women have a choice is presumptuous. In government institutions across the country, women are required to wear saree. In most of these institutions this isn’t a rule, but a norm. Rules are upheld by law. Norms are upheld by society. While there are many offices across the country at which wearing the sari is not mandatory for women, in most government offices the sari is the norm, a norm that is upheld as if it is a rule, and enforced by both men and women to maintain the traditional double standards women are handed on a silver platter all their life.

I have, in many instances, been informed by my male employers to consider wearing a sari to work, in some cases they have insisted that I do. In the United States, some parts of Europe and many parts of the world where social standards are upheld by legislature, this falls under sexual harassment. I know I’m not alone in this experience. I also know that countless women have faced much worse treatment in their workplaces. In a country such as ours, where social norms are bent towards sexist practices, it’s fair to believe that we need to establish legislature that gives women protection from the everyday exploitation they face in workplaces. In 2017 why is it that we are yet to establish this legislative infrastructure? The answer to this question is written all over our society and the many barriers women face in having equal rights and respect; one of the main reasons behind it being elite conservatism.

A year ago I wrote a piece for the Colombo Telegraph titled What Your Schools Didn’t Teach You. It was one of the most criticized pieces of my writing only second to my second novel The Terrorist’s Daughter. I wrote it fully aware of the backlash it is vulnerable to receive and the fact that it disavows much of the unique egomaniacal fraternized misogynistic culture Colombo society upholds. I specifically chose the Colombo Telegraph for the purpose of reaching the exact community that its target audience comprises. What Your Schools Didn’t Teach You didn’t belong in Sri Lanka’s elite print newspapers, or my books, or in the conversations had in coffee-shop-liberal forums. It had to be in a medium that could be freely accessed by those riding the wave of Colombo’s elite conservatism; and that, it did. And it trickled down to the very bases of our societal, government, business, and NGO/ INGO sectors that are overtaken by the essence of this elite conservatism. It stung them hard, and created a wave of backlash that pronounced the very misogyny that my writing was referring to.

There are instances when one can justify conservatism. This shouldn’t be the case, but in some parts of the country, where rural society is abandoned time and time again from the development equation, where basic resources don’t reach their schools or hospitals, creating many barriers to social development, rural conservatism and backward thinking is somewhat justified. But elite conservatism on the other hand, is inexcusable. Elite conservatism is a situation in which despite the existence of the optimal socioeconomic conditions for social progress, society blatantly chooses to discriminate, and not defend equal rights and respect for all. That is a problem. When we point out elite sexism, people immediately dismiss it, often using anecdotal evidence to prove that sexism doesn’t exist in Colombo. They point at Otara Gunawardene, Hirunika Premachandra and Rosy Senanayake and all the other Colombo women who overcame these challenges and made a name for themselves. They conveniently forget the character-bashing Hirunika had to deal with in the wake of her father’s murder, they forget that people found Gammampilla and Weerawansa to be more electable than Rosy, and that despite it being far from the truth, people like to talk about how Otara didn’t have time to be a mom because she was such a busy career-woman. Sexism in elite Sri Lanka is an undisputed reality.

Take our government, for instance. The decisions on public policy made by our government affect all Sri Lankan men and women alike. But out of our Cabinet of 47 members only 2 are women. Think about it, although women take up over 50% of our population, at the most powerful table in the country where the most crucial decisions are made, only 4% is women. Representation matters. Lack of representation nourishes oppression. In our schools, workplaces and government women face a constant double standard of scrutiny. The dress code is a symbolic element of the institutional sexism in this country that reinforces this deeper issue that leads to lack of women in places of power.

In some of the most powerful offices in the country, the saree is not a mere norm women adapt to fit in, to avoid shame from their peers, or live up to socialized standards set by society, it is an institutionalized protocol. Women are not allowed into certain parts of the parliament if they aren’t dressed in a long sleeved saree jacket. This institutionalized sexism is nourished in Sri Lankan elite society. Many elite schools in the country impose bizarre dress codes for mothers who come to pick up their kids. The excuse being, mothers exposing themselves to young boys may cause them distress; because apparently men are so fragile they cannot look at a woman in a sleeveless blouse or a short skirt without getting aroused. Why is it that it is the job of the woman to assure that men don’t get aroused by them? Hate to break the news to those who didn’t know, but not all women who choose to dress comfortably and fashionably in this humid country are looking to arouse men.

Forget the dress code, some Colombo elite institutions have established rules to ensure women are given a back seat in its organization and left out of its administration altogether. One of the most elite sports club in Colombo, the Sinhalese Sports Club (SSC) as a rule, does not allow women to be full members of their board, women are only allowed Associate Member status and do not get to vote. Several years ago when some women attempted to change that rule and allow women too to have voting board seats, male board members who hadn’t set foot in club meetings for years, including bed ridden men in wheelchairs showed up at the meeting and voted no to allowing women into the board. To this day, women are not allowed in the SSC Board nor are they allowed full membership. Don’t tell me we don’t have a problem of elite sexism in this country, because we most certainly do.

Some women, myself included, prefer to wear pants and a shirt, but turns out most men do not like it when women wear pants to work, almost as if the fact that we too have limbs is best kept a mystery. In the past two years I spent working and attending meetings at Government offices I chose to stick to my values of wearing what I felt was respectful to both the institution I was walking into and also my own body; until a couple of months ago, I had never worn a saree to work. My professional priority has always been the quality of my work. In my head I always assumed that respect is earned through delivery, through a work ethic that’s powerful and gets things done. I knew my not adapting to the normative dress code held me back a little, but I always worked twice as hard to make up for that. My theory was that if you work really hard and are really good at your job, you become invaluable to the institution and eventually nobody is going to care about what you’re wearing, they will want you regardless. This has been the case for the most part. Once at a meeting, a woman in a saree asked me, “the Saree is the dress code. How did you get in here without wearing saree?” I told her it’s because I’m really good at my job, and continued onto the meeting. But I couldn’t kid myself, things are much harder for the women who don’t obey the norms.

As an experiment I tried wearing sarees to meetings at state institutions to which I have previously worn my usual business formal clothing. There’s a distinct difference in the ease of getting things done and getting people’s attention to the matter you need addressed when you are in saree. The nicest of all, to me, was the absence of the glares of scorn that I got from other women at state institutions when I didn’t wear saree. As if my pants and I were letting down all womankind. Most male employers validate your role in their institution when you show up in saree. It’s often very subtle, but for anyone paying attention, it establishes a clear ceiling, putting you in your place. Yes, it’s just a dress code, but it also sends a clear message: if you don’t have your six inches, you’ve got to wear your six yards.

*Thisuri Wanniarachchi, 23, a graduate of Political Science and is the State Literary Award-winning author of novels Colombo Streets (2009) and The Terrorist’s Daughter and (2014).  She is Sri Lanka’s youngest nationally acclaimed author. 
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85 Responses to Six Inches Or Six Yards

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    Thisuri; Surely Saree is better than the three-Quarter length Skirt and Loose blouse that many Women choose to wear instead? What is your suggestion they wear instead?

    Hamlet
    April 21, 2017 at 1:06 pm
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      This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

      SS
      April 21, 2017 at 1:53 pm
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      Here’s a suggestion. How about whatever that’s convenient for the woman as long it’s formal enough to be worn to a working/business environment.

      Disney
      April 21, 2017 at 9:26 pm
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      “Surely Saree is better than the three-Quarter length Skirt and Loose blouse that many Women choose to wear instead?” And the above is based on what criteria exactly ??? Are you a Saree-Merchant ? Or a Saree-Blouse maker ? Don’t get me wrong., if you were the above, then your Opinion is valid but if you are basing “better” on some other abstract notion, I think we should all know about it

      maalumiris
      April 21, 2017 at 10:38 pm
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        Maalu Miris;, I am not talking about the Colombo Set who go for Designer Western Clothes, but the Everyday Wear of women you see all the time, in their long skirt and loose top, and slippers! Sticking to the Redda hatte’ would be a better option. I wish CT would accept photos of the type of dress I am talking about.

        Hamlet
        April 22, 2017 at 3:20 am
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          Hamlet I don’t see what the problem is. What business is it of mine or yours, for that matter, what the “Colombo Set” or “Women you see all the time” wear ? The women I see all the time wear everything from redda/hatte, skirt and blouse, mumu’s niqab, salwar-kameez, jeans and pants. I think you will have pretty poor luck forcing your personal dress-code upon all of the above! Fear not: You may yet be able to force it upon your missus and daughters

          maalumiris
          April 22, 2017 at 5:36 am
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          Hamlet “Sticking to the Redda hatte’ would be a better option.” If you enjoy Redda Hatte fetishism it is alright as it is an old fashion statement. Man you have taste, style and hope you enjoy voyeurism watching the women their voluptuous parts through hole in the fence, roof top, …. Enjoy still Redda Hatte fashion lasts.

          Native Vedda
          April 22, 2017 at 1:12 pm
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    Well in the private sector, girls get to regularly wear knee length skirts of the which the equivalent is for men are shorts, which they (men) are not permitted to wear. Additionally, women are permitted to expose shoulder dresses, where company policy permits, but men are never ever allowed to wear equivalent shoulder bearing vests. This is clearly a feminist narrative in search of a story. She picks and chooses stories to paint her narrative. Why talk about the dress code and then says ‘forget the dress code? And then also picks certain angles to her stories very conveniently – Hirunika got bail in record breaking time for a crime she clearly committed and to date has not been investigated after a year. And Otara has children, who she has raised successfully – please get your basic facts right otherwise you are just babbling for sympathy and your argument falls flat. I am all for merit-based equal rights and agree that some aspects of society are patriarchal, but not everything is. (The SSC situation I agree is not acceptable). For the sake of your own credibility, make sure there is a proper story otherwise clearly biased and agenda driven stories like this are easily exposed.

    John Peters
    April 21, 2017 at 1:25 pm
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      Exactly John Peters! When I used to work, If I ever wore a sleeveless shirt to office my bosses would have sent me home. Since I was in IT I had a little bit of freedom. We were permitted to wear not very well ironed shirts & pants, no need for belts and shoes need not be polished. But for the marketing and front office teams there were strict dress codes. Men had to wear nice shinny shoes, well iron clothes and the shirts had to be long-sleeved. Women had slightly more options since they could wear pants like the men or skirts few inches below the knee. Both parties had to have proper hygiene. We did not see this as sexism but as away of presenting a professional look. This was a UK based company and the same rules applied in England. Employees had to maintain a professional outlook or risk getting kicked-out. Women do have more dress option at work than men. Do men scream sexism? Maybe men should demand that their bosses enforce a universal dress code.

      Thanos
      April 21, 2017 at 7:18 pm
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    Why not confine to the redda and hatte to go with traditions ? I say let the women decide what they want to wear.. what’s anyone’s problem with it ?

    Roga
    April 21, 2017 at 1:45 pm
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      What about Muslim women’s dress? No one questions that. So let women wear what they want.

      Logy
      April 22, 2017 at 9:20 am
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

    Leena
    April 21, 2017 at 1:56 pm
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    Thisuri, I don’t have six inches, should I consider wearing sarees too?. Just kidding. I love your logical analysis and writing style.

    AVB
    April 21, 2017 at 2:06 pm
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    Thisuri, Many years ago(in your grandfather’s time, probably) ladies were allowed to wear skirts to government institutions. Not that there were many ladies working in them . Males (including policemen) wore baggy shorts with long socks. Nowadays it is curious that policewomen are required to wear skirts and policemen long trousers! Those were also the days when you could not enter Cargills without knowing English. There IS a category of men who are required to wear sarees, but these are restricted to yellow or brown. Jokes apart, the problem lies with the vast majority of women ,who prefer to wear sarees, like the ones who glare at you in meetings. You ought to get some like-minded friends together and protest. But you are just 23, and I wonder what you will think in 10 year’s time? Whatever said and done, the saree can cover a lot of things while exposing others.

    old codger
    April 21, 2017 at 3:50 pm
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    Dear Thishuri, You have said things interestingly. There is a good deal of sexism in the country. Yes, why can’t women at least vote for a woman. I have voted once for Rosie S. because she fights effectively on worthwhile issues. MMDA was being talked about a month ago; silence now. I don’t read everything you write, it often doesn’t concern a villager like me who doesn’t haunt the SSC (can’t afford it!), but how much have you commented on the most pathetic plight for females: being born in to a Muslim household? I’ve commented a lot, but without ever allowing myself to be Islamophobic.

    Sinhala_Man
    April 21, 2017 at 3:53 pm
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    Thisuri, Great! You hit the nail at the right place. I have raised this issue with several people and have heard all kinds of weird stories. To me this is a question of being practical. We can have ‘Sariya’ as a traditional dress but it is not a practical dress. A blouse and a slack is more practical than ‘Sariya’. Some Sri Lankans cling to tradition without looking at the issue from a practical point of view. Most of the working women take public transport to work. What a hassle traveling in public transport wearing a ‘Sari’. Some hold the view that ‘Sari’ is more decent than slack and blouse. Not always. The way some ladies keep ‘Obe Theeraya’ is really sexy. Another thing that I have noticed in Sri Lanka is wearing the Hindian ‘Shalvar’ is more acceptable than wearing slack and blouse. Slack and blouse is ‘foreign’ but ‘Shalvar’ is not ‘foreign’. To my knowledge, even ‘Sari’ is not traditional Sri Lankan. As Roga points out ‘Redda’ and ‘Hette’ is Sri Lankan traditional dress of women. Why not give a modern touch and use that even for formal occasions. I tried to bring this idea to the attention of Sri Lankan Airlines management (former) but there was no response. There is also a misconception among us that trouser and slack are western things. This is wrong. Chinese wore trousers and slacks for thousands of years and I guess western people copied Chinese. Look at the situation in East Asian countries. They have traditional dresses for women but they wear the traditional dress only for special occasions. For day to day work they wear what our traditional minded people call ‘Western’ dresses. Some might call it ‘Westernization’ but I call it ‘Modernization’.

    Eagle Eye
    April 21, 2017 at 4:40 pm
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      She hit the nail into the groin; Is that the right place … . .. ‘What a hassle travelling in public transport wearing a ‘Sari’. – I now guess that you are a woman! .. ‘The way some ladies keep ‘Obe Theeraya’ is really sexy’. You pervert!

      Unreal
      April 22, 2017 at 9:30 am
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      Eagle Eye:- “We can have ‘Sariya’ as a traditional dress but it is not a practical dress” ‘Practical’ is a relative Word. You see Tea Plucker ladies going about their Daily Tasks, wearing Sarees with a basket on their Back. How much more Practical can you get!

      Hamlet
      April 22, 2017 at 9:40 am
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        Hamlet, Did you ask any of those tea plucking ladies what they think about wearing ‘Sari’ to work. My observations are based on discussions I held with a couple of ladies. It will be interesting to conduct a survey taking a representative sample.

        Eagle Eye
        April 22, 2017 at 10:35 am
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          Eagle Eye/Dr Clean/SL Citizen “Did you ask any of those tea plucking ladies what they think about wearing ‘Sari’ to work.” Do you think they would be happy in their bikini or G string while plucking tea? “It will be interesting to conduct a survey taking a representative sample.” While you are on this survey find out about their working conditions, pay structure, health and safety issues, dignity, level of their education, income, ………. choice of employment, housing, ………. access to public services, ….

          Native Vedda
          April 22, 2017 at 1:22 pm
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    [Edited out] Comments should not exceed 300 words.Please read our Comments Policy for further details.

    Ranjini
    April 21, 2017 at 4:43 pm
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    Let me educate you as a Real American. Take it and learn or leave it and not learn before espousing idealist shit not practiced in the USA. Blacks as a rule were not even allowed into Golf Clubs or any club of any nature except to serve mint Juleps even in the North. Blacks even today cannot hold positions in many private clubs. Women also cannot hold top positions in many Golf clubs and other clubs. Private clubs can have rules. It behooves you also learn about your host nation. Bennington being so expensive school, should teach you about US history. So leave SSC alone unless you want to start knocking on doors in top Golf Clubs in the US and preach to them as to why there are NO women in top ranks and even amongst Tennis clubs and also why there are NO Blacks at all. Here is some education for you. Golf is the super elite MOSTLY white sport until Tiger Woods tore down the walls. Masters is the most prestigious tournament held in the US in Augusta Georgia. The golf club’s exclusive membership policies have drawn criticism particularly because there were no African-American members admitted until 1990 as well as a former policy requiring all caddies to be black. The club began granting membership to women ONLY in August 2012. Prior to the acceptance of female members, Augusta National defended its position by citing that in 2011, more than 15% of the non-tournament rounds were played by female players who were member guests or spouses of active members. In August 2012, it admitted its first two female members, Condoleezza Rice and Darla Moore.The golf club has defended the membership policies, stressing that it is a private organization

    Ranjini
    April 21, 2017 at 4:55 pm
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      Ranjini, For a “real American”, you seem to have a rather hazy grasp of grammar: “Golf is the super elite MOSTLY white sport until Tiger Woods tore down the walls” “Bennington being so expensive school, should teach you about US history. “

      romani
      April 21, 2017 at 10:45 pm
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      @Ranjini Private clubs can have rules. They don’t have to be intelligent rules

      maalumiris
      April 21, 2017 at 10:47 pm
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        maalumiris “They don’t have to be intelligent rules” Are we talking about Sri Lankan state and the rules the state functionaries come up with? Here is something that inspires our functionaries. The Seven Rules of Bureaucracy: Rule 1: Maintain the problem at all costs! The problem is the basis of power, perks, privileges, and security. Rule 2: Use crisis and perceived crisis to increase your power and control. Rule 2a. Force 11th-hour decisions, threaten the loss of options and opportunities, and limit the opposition’s opportunity to review and critique. Rule 3: If there are not enough crises, manufacture them, even from nature, where none exist. Rule 4: Control the flow and release of information while feigning openness. Rule 4a: Deny, delay, obfuscate, spin, and lie. Rule 5: Maximize public-relations exposure by creating a cover story that appeals to the universal need to help people. Rule 6: Create vested support groups by distributing concentrated benefits and/or entitlements to these special interests, while distributing the costs broadly to one’s political opponents. Rule 7: Demonize the truth tellers who have the temerity to say, “The emperor has no clothes.” mises.org/library/seven-rules-bureaucracy maalumiris You sound like an old retired Sri Lankan state functionary hence the 7 rules must ring a bell. Were you a successful practitioner of the art of sitting tight and say no to the will of the people. I suspect you are.

        Native Vedda
        April 22, 2017 at 1:57 pm
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      Comparisons are odious Ranjini. To say this and that club in the UK follow a men only policy and therefore the SSC in tiny Sri lanka is also justified in following that policy leaves much to be desired. There are men and men. If Sri lankan men compare themselves to European men then they should do other things that European men do. Be manly, physical,have a imposing posture, climb mountains, swim across fast flowing rivers, win gold medals at Olympics,build huge economies,run reasonably honest systems, have an imperial history ( dominance over inferior races) etc etc. If our men cannot do any of the millions of things that define manhood in an European sense, what is the point in having male only clubs ?

      harry hatton
      April 22, 2017 at 7:38 am
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    Women should not be forced to wear a saree, neither should the saree be part of any compulsory dress code. However, the saree is definitely superior to the niqab or burkha. All things being relative, SL is leagues ahead of many developing countries when it comes to women’s rights.

    Lester
    April 21, 2017 at 5:50 pm
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      Lester, If you look it up, Afghanistan has more women MPs than Sri Lanka. So who is advanced?

      yusuf
      April 22, 2017 at 8:59 am
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        So just because a country has more women MPs it is advanced? How are women treated outside parliament in Afghanistan and Sri Lanka?

        Atticus
        April 22, 2017 at 5:42 pm
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    At Thisuri Wanniarachchi, Regarding SSC not allowing women to vote, Tell me! Is the SSC a public or private institution? If it is a public institution then start protesting, go to the courts and get equal representation, demand compensation for discrimination, etc. But if it is strictly a private entity then you should mind your own business (Unless there are criminal activities or fundamental rights have been violated). If you have such big problem with the SSC then boycott the place especially during international matches or pressure SLC not to host match there at all. I have the freedom to start a private all-male club, where membership is exclusively for men. That is none of YOUR business. If you think that is elite male sexism, well that is strictly YOUR problem. Only exception is if the courts say/rule otherwise. * HOWEVER When it comes to public institutions and local, provincial and national level government then the situation is completely different from strictly private entities. There has to be equal or at least fair unbiased representation regardless of ones gender, ethnicity, religion, caste, wealth, etc, etc.

    Thanos
    April 21, 2017 at 6:21 pm
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      Dear Thanos, This Thisuri can write reasonably well; why on earth can’t she find more worthwhile subjects to write on. I have no objection to women wearing anything. If nothing, I am likely to view with pleasure the first few days; it’ll then become quite blase. The six inches was a clever one; a bit risque, of course. When I started reading I thought it referred to six inches of midriff being displayed, which seemed to have caused quite a stir at S. Joseph’s, Darley Road. Catholic Priests (snort!) And I liked that one about monks having to wear saffron saris. But isn’t it all so trivial. Getting ashamed of myself for having being seduced by this Thisuri. Wouldn’t mind, if it happened more literally!

      Sinhala_Man
      April 21, 2017 at 10:46 pm
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    Thanos, I agree with your viewpoint. But women think they can cry for equality while when it is convenient to them they will not care about equality. Thisuri, I am 9 inches and not six. And I am also a Veteran of the Armed forces of Sri Lanka with a supremely fit physique. And please don’t think you are equal to me. You are not. It’s been proven beyond a reasonable doubt that women have smaller brains. The size of a squirrel. Dr Geethanjana Mendis once said, a female athlete is equal to a disabled male. Professor J.B Peiris famously claimed that a woman’s vagina was shaped like a Volcanic crater because it was meant for eruptions.

    Rtd. Lt. Reginald Shamal Perera
    April 21, 2017 at 7:10 pm
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      “Kandyan” Perera ! Are you for real ?? Or are you just trolling here ? :)

      maalumiris
      April 21, 2017 at 10:48 pm
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    “When we point out elite sexism, people immediately dismiss it, often using anecdotal evidence to prove that sexism doesn’t exist in Colombo. They point at Otara Gunawardene, Hirunika Premachandra and Rosy Senanayake and all the other Colombo women who overcame these challenges and made a name for themselves. They conveniently forget the character-bashing Hirunika had to deal with in the wake of her father’s murder, they forget that people found Gammampilla and Weerawansa to be more electable than Rosy, and that despite it being far from the truth, people like to talk about how Otara didn’t have time to be a mom because she was such a busy career-woman. Sexism in elite Sri Lanka is an undisputed reality.” Isn’t it ironical that this writer accuses those who deny sexism of using anecdotal evidence, then she herself proceeds to use anecdotal evidence to prove that sexism exists? It is funny a ‘writer’ who cannot construct a coherent article that doesn’t digress into extraneous issues (What has the third para got to do with the article? It is just a condescending, narcissistic and bigoted way of defending a stupid article and this shows her fragile feminist ego has been hurt by all those criticisms) has been published by Colombo Telegraph.

    Temujin
    April 21, 2017 at 7:17 pm
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

    AuntyNita
    April 21, 2017 at 7:17 pm
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

    AuntyNita
    April 21, 2017 at 7:20 pm
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    Thisuri, Men and women are put on this earth for one thing, so why make a political issue out of it? As far as women’s clothes are concerned I’d say “less is more.”

    nimal fernando
    April 21, 2017 at 7:44 pm
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    we have a lot of urgent issues to discuss rather than the choice of cloths. focus on producing skilled workforce who could find jobs market in tech field, talk about that instead of old stories.

    ananda segara
    April 21, 2017 at 7:50 pm
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    Well,Women are not allowed for full membership in SSC. That’s a clear sexual descrimination. I admit. You say in the parliament women are not allowed without full sleeved jacket. Because full sleeved jacket is equlent to the women’s western formal wear. If you don’t like full sleeve jacket try some western formal wear. But don’t try to wear sleeveless jackets and very tight pants which exposes underwears. Even men are not allowed to wear sleeveless Tshirts or shorts or three-quarters to workplaces. Women when they are at beach they can wear 2 peice. Try to understand the situation. Please don’t never ever write this kinda biased articles which totally blame men..👍

    Seyon sithamparanathan
    April 21, 2017 at 8:09 pm
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    A lot of hatred and misplaced anger by an elitist. Women can CHOOSE to wear Sari or business pants or dress. I know so many women who CHOSE to stop working to spend quality time with their kids and then start consulting because their spouses had good jobs; but the additional 300,000 to 400,000 rupees the consulting brought in helped a lot . This is a choice. Otara’s choice is because she was already from a rich family and was a superb driven entrepreneur. You mention her not having kids; well there are “other” reasons. Poor kid is now divorced because of that “other” reason. You need to stop sounding like a male hater like those who went to Vassar and bringing penis size ridicule here. But I think your anger is misplaced because you probably come from a family where the mother did the homemaker role and cooked and cleaned for you and your dad. Also you should focus on privileges of Army life and corruption rather than Sari or Skirt. Even my Doctor wife wears skirts to Govt Hospitals in Sri Lanka with her long white coat. As for SSC, it is a PRIVATE club that plays cricket and is on the same as MCC in England. It only voted to allow females in 1998. The club’s members persistently refused to allow female membership well into the 1990s, with club ballots on the change unable to attract the two-thirds majority amongst the membership required for implementation. So you need to get a life and focus on serious issues. And you need to study Masters August Golf. You wear whatever you want with your hysterical male bashing. My wife is a doctor who makes more money than I do. IS your Daddy ok with such families? Do you have Daddy issues?

    Halitosis
    April 21, 2017 at 9:19 pm
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    Also SSC HAS female members; it has a LOTS Of paying female members. CR & FC does not have a female on their board because it is a male private rugby club. Even in the USA it is the same.

    Halitosis
    April 21, 2017 at 9:20 pm
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    Why don’t you have a Sari burning protest this May 1st like the bra burning Hippie festivals of 1968-69?This while you enjoy food cooked by your servants in your wealthy family home with servants.

    Halitosis
    April 21, 2017 at 9:21 pm
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      Halitosis:- Do People in Sri Lanka still have “Servants”? Why do we continue to give our Votes to people like the Present Politicians, who are treating us like Vassals and Servants! We seem to be living in the Dark Ages, that the rest of the World left behind at the beginning of the 21st century!

      Hamlet
      April 22, 2017 at 2:10 pm
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    What will teach the men only SSC is for all women to resign their Associate membership and for their own Sports Club. In general, our women athletes have fared far better than our male counterparts and this would be a viable proposition.

    Sylvia Haik
    April 21, 2017 at 10:04 pm
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    Thisuri, I have appreciated some of your writings, in the past. And, have expressed so. But, on this article, I cannot do so, I am afraid. The most disturbing element of your write up is the conclusion, – ‘if you don’t have your six inches, you’ve got to wear your six yards’. How does that enhance the value of your presentation. It is not just sexist, it is vulgar too! Dress is part of our values, – our culture. Would you advocate people to walk around naked on a balmy day? By the way, your complaint would cease if both sexes are ‘dressed’ naked. If ladies themselves don’t seem to mind it, for whom are you speaking. It is a matter of taste. So, let us leave dress to the individuals and not raise a huge cry over it. Dress codes have a bearing on the ‘faces’ of the Institutions. I wouldn’t complain. I anticipate receiving a barrage of criticism against my say. I wouldn’t bother to take them to heart. Why would I? I am not taking a position!

    Unreal
    April 21, 2017 at 10:19 pm
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    Well,Women are not allowed for full membership in SSC. That’s a clear sexual descrimination. I admit. You say in the parliament women are not allowed without full sleeved jacket. Because full sleeved jacket is equlent to the women’s western formal wear. If you don’t like full sleeve jacket try some western formal wear. But don’t try to wear sleeveless jackets and very tight pants which exposes underwears. Even men are not allowed to wear sleeveless Tshirts or shorts or three-quarters to workplaces. Women when they are at beach they can wear 2 peice. Try to understand the situation. Please don’t never ever write this kinda biased articles which totally blame men

    Seyon sithamparanathan
    April 21, 2017 at 10:56 pm
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    You are a slim 23 year old girl so you can wear anything you want. The majority of Lankan women (of any ethnicity) in their forties and fifties have a barrel shape. So they dare not wear pants and t-shirt or even skirt and blouse. I hate to say this, but if you want to have a good laugh, take a tailor’s tape measure to a middle aged Lankan woman. When you are fifty years old, you will also choose to wear a saree, no doubt.

    Estate Labourer
    April 21, 2017 at 11:09 pm
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    This is just BS. Saying that the West has this standard and that as the democracy. So, Sinahle women should do the same. If you want to wear micromini skirt, do it. You would do that certainly if you have parts that can show off. On the other hand, there is something called culture too. What you are saying is Foff with the culture let us do what the western women do. I don’t think that women has to be 50% of the cabinet whether they want it or not. women should be asked to wear tights to work to show their body parts etc., are those essential. those women are not good for marraige. If you know wetern women were highly oppressed. then only because of the world war they had to come out in order to fill the manufacturing positions that were made vacent by men fighting in the battle filed. IT is in the British law, that a woman is allowed to beat with a stick thick enough with the husband’s finger. There is something called Lady godiva parade in which a woman paraded in the city naked in order to oppose the oppression of women by men, particularly the aristocrat husband. Tell us when Sinhale women, even with buddhism being the religious belief, were treated like ?

    jimsofty
    April 22, 2017 at 12:29 am
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      Jimmy, The Brits dont send their women to slave in Dubai. Sinhala Buddhist women are sent there by their lazy husbands.

      yusuf
      April 22, 2017 at 9:15 am
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        Shame on you yusuf. How can you forget Rizana Nafeek.

        Atticus
        April 22, 2017 at 5:40 pm
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      Jim, “women should be asked to wear tights to work to show their body parts etc., are those essential. those women are not good for marraige” Explain plz

      Fathima
      April 22, 2017 at 2:33 pm
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

    Rajash
    April 22, 2017 at 2:57 am
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    My conclusion is young and stupid.

    jimsofty
    April 22, 2017 at 3:23 am
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    ” if you don’t have your six inches, you’ve got to wear your six yards.” Great line but is that all the Sri Lankan men you know are capable of, Six Inches?

    Rajash
    April 22, 2017 at 3:27 am
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      Only six? Lol

      Logy
      April 22, 2017 at 9:21 am
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