17 December, 2017

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Sri Lanka Must Deliver On UNHRC Commitments: Amnesty International

While appreciating some important steps Sri Lanka has taken since the adoption of UNHRC Resolution 30/11, including the ratification of the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance and the passage of the amended Office on Missing Persons Act, the Amnesty International said it is disappointed by the lack of progress, and in some cases backsliding, on the important commitments reflected in resolution 30/1 regarding: enforced disappearances; truth, justice and reparation; protection of religious and ethnic minorities and human rights defenders; and the repeal of the Prevention of Terrorism Act (PTA).

Submitting its written statement for the thirty-sixth session of the UN Human Rights Council, which is scheduled for September 2017, the Amnesty International said: “Human Rights Council resolution 30/1 sets out concrete steps to ensuring truth, justice, reparation and non-recurrence for human rights violations and abuses. Council resolution 34/1 requested the Government “to implement fully the measures identified by the Council in its resolution 30/1 that are outstanding.”

This written statement provides an assessment of Sri Lanka’s progress in delivering on its human rights obligations, and implementation of resolution 30/1. Click here to read the full statement.

 

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Latest comments

  • 3
    13

    What is this Amnesty yapping about? No one takes any notice. Their high-salaried chief who came to Colombo, spoke nothing very new and then left must be thinking that a statement or two or a submission or two will justify his non-work on actual problems.

    Shameful.

    • 7
      3

      Pandu, I am very impressed by your typing. What else do you want him to do, drag MR, GR, SR, ..by their b***s all the way to Galle Face green and have them shot? Please advise.

      • 0
        4

        Native Vedda – No I would not want him to do anything of the sort as there are courts of law for that.

        What I WOULD like his organisation to do is engage in good work without just issuing statements from time to time. And by good work, I mean look at the work done by Amnesty in the 80’s when they were actively involved and had solid people who understood the issues in SL, not fly-by-night characters who fly in and out, pose on a stage with Ministers and know very little about what is happening here.

  • 7
    0

    AI is doing its job. There is no bigger violation of HR than stealing ones money in broad daylight by the government.

    • 0
      4

      Did you even READ the release, Mr Nuwan?? There is nothing of ‘stealing money’ in that.

      This silliness is really too much.

  • 0
    2

    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

  • 13
    0

    Lets cut to sharp focus here.

    NONE of our Sinhalese political leaders (that’s 85%) will ever allow our local heroes to be tried by even one foreign judge. AND no local judge will happily step forward to do the deed. So our political masters have mastered the dark arts of delay, obfuscation and saying-what-is-needed outside, maintain the status quo at home. Our national carpet gets bigger and bigger to hid the things we sweep under.

  • 13
    2

    Persons who bombed, shelled, shot at, and in the process killed, wounded and maimed thousands of civilians – are/were labelled “heroes” and are deemed to be exempt from prosecution, though enforcement of the Resolution of UNHRC proposed by USA and sponsored by Sri Lanka and passed by the UNHRC.
    Thousands more, who were loaded into buses in full sight of all have “disappeared”.

    A Military Regime has been established in former areas of hostilities, which has plundered private homes and lands, and, thousands of acres of state lands used for agriculture and animal husbandry, taken over by the state.
    Thousands of homes and places of worship have been looted and demolished.
    Citizens are harassed daily, after being labelled ex-LTTE, hundreds still in jail.

    This state of affairs has no parallel anywhere else, after cessation of hostilities.

    The Sri Lanka state is under obligation to carry out its duties under the resolution sponsored by itself, by establishment of Hybrid Courts and prosecutors.

    • 12
      1

      This is what an Indian Journalist remarked quite recently when she visited the island, she was shocked at how openly and with impunity the Sinhalese state the armed forces police and public plunder from the Tamils in the north and east. and now the Muslims and nothing done about this and the state protects them.. Even in highly corrupt India there is nothing like this.

  • 1
    0

    no point in showing this photograph as a human rights issue.If you look closely enough it is not a aggression but a meditation.The IGP is looking into the eyes of the lift operator very keenly.By holding onto his collar the thattaya is forced to look deeply into the eyes of the IGP.This is called trancedental meditation where the eyes are focused totally on something and the mind goes into transcedental mode.Those who have done advanced meditation like me will understand what i am talking.However the IGP should realise that more than 25 years of police habits of clutching at the collar will be misunderstood and police type of meditation should be done where cameras are not available,otherwise general public will misunderstand and think it is police brutality.

    I invite those to look carefully here at transcendental meditation.Whatever you google is not true and only true practitioners like us know exactly what it is.

    https://www.colombotelegraph.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/IGP-Pujith-attacking–150×130.jpg

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