26 June, 2019

Blog

Two Years After

By Izeth Hussain

Izeth Hussain

Izeth Hussain

Two years after the January 2015 General Elections – which I and some others hailed as a Revolution -there is widespread disillusionment about the present Government. Apparently corruption continues at an unacceptable level, and things in general are more or less the same though with some improvements. Differences are of degree, not of kind, and it would seem therefore that it was over-sanguine to have talked of a Revolution. In my response I would focus on the Government’s positive performance on the restoration of democracy, on taking corrective action on the economy, on offering some hope of movement towards a solution of the ethnic problem, and on coping with new challenges in our foreign relations.

All that may not amount to much. But that accords with the meliorist position in politics which aims at ameliorating the human condition, not at establishing a utopia. Politics is seen as the art of the possible, and there is recognition of the fact that in politics what is often on offer is not a choice between the good and the bad but between the bad and the worse. Consequently improvements, even though they may be of a modest order, are to be welcomed. But where does the Revolution come in? That comes in because of the dynamics of modernity: small improvements accumulate and result in change of a revolutionary order. In Sri Lanka, for instance, there was no successful mass revolution during the last century. But changes of an undoubtedly revolutionary order did take place between 1900 and 1999.

I believe that it will help in attaining a balanced assessment of our present situation if we view it in a long-term perspective, taking particular account of revolutionary changes. Before proceeding further I must clarify that an assessment of Sri Lanka’s present situation is a huge and complex matter, and what I am offering in this article are no more than a few notes, a few pointers, towards that assessment. From 1948 to 1956 we had a liberal market-oriented economy together with welfare measures that were exceptional for an underdeveloped country, within an admirably fully functioning democracy. Had those strategies continued under an enlightened leadership willing to make certain changes Sri Lanka could have become a rare success story of a developing country combining growth with equity.

That did not happen because of the 1956 Revolution, which was a local manifestation of the Afro-Asian variety of socialism that swept through several countries including India, Burma, Soekarno’s Indonesia, Nasser’s Egypt, the Syria and Iraq of the Baath Socialists, Kaunda’s Zambia, Nyerere’s Tanzania, Seku Toure’s Guinea etc. In Latin America the closest approximation to Afro-Asian socialism was the populism of Peron of Argentina, but there was nothing comparable anywhere else in Latin America because American imperialism tolerated only traditional oligarchic dictatorship. The positive feature of Afro-Asian socialism was an authentic indigenous nationalism that displaced the neo-colonialism of the Westernised elites. In Sri Lanka that nationalism led to the rise to elite levels of the Sinhalese lower middle class. The rise of that class in other Afro-Asian countries also led to another common characteristic: state-centric economies that left a record of ubiquitous failure.

There is one characteristic of Afro-Asian socialism that has not got adequate recognition. Behind all the rhetoric of socialism, Afro-Asian socialism was basically a mechanism for the rise of the lower middle class to elite levels. That class did not for the most part have higher education enabling it to rise in the Administration and the professions; nor did it have the skills and the capital to make money through business. There was only one way in which that class could rise quickly to positions of power and affluence. It had to be through the State, and that really was the dynamic behind the State-centric economies of Afro-Asia. An undue proportion of the resources of the State – the produce of the people as a whole – went to the politically influential. It was a form of theft. A moral rottenness was therefore installed at the very core of the Sri Lankan polity after 1956.

The next revolutionary change took place in 1977. President JR deserves credit for having been the first South Asian leader to grasp that the motor of growth in the developing countries had to be the private sector. He therefore re-installed a liberal market-oriented outward-looking economy which quickly started producing spectacular growth rates. But, alas, he earned credit for nothing else. There was a failure in attracting foreign direct investment: the big multinationals stayed aloof from Sri Lanka not only after the 1983 holocaust but even before that – the reason for which requires exploration. On the ethnic front he presided over the anti-Tamil pogroms from 1977 to 1983, rendering inevitable the 26-year civil war that followed. On the political front, he destroyed democracy utterly, showing hatred and contempt towards it. It’s about time that we Sri Lankans start assessing performance in politics not by rhetoric but by results. What were the results of his rule? By 1988 there were two civil wars going on simultaneously, those of the LTTE and of the JVP; the IPKF troops were here behaving like conquerors; the Government had lost control over a third of the national territory and over half of the coastline.

What went wrong? We can think of half a hundred reasons, some of which are more important than others. I go back to the analyses I used to make in the first half of the ‘nineties in which I gave central importance to the destruction of moral standards by the then Government. The hypothesis behind that argument was that a society is held together by a moral system which leads to a legal system which in turn regulates public life. If that moral system is in decay, and if furthermore it comes under attack by the State, the disintegration of that society has to follow. And that precisely was what had happened by 1988.

I will give a few examples of attacks on moral standards after 1977. The late Sarachchandra used to inveigh against some of the ill effects of the liberalized economy. That displeased the State, whose henchmen beat him up together with Buddhist monks in a public place with total impunity. The Supreme Court gave a verdict that displeased the State. The Judges were subjected in their residences to threats and abuse by thugs who were transported in CTB buses. Gonawala Sunil was convicted as the leader in a case of gang rape. After a brief while in prison he was given a Presidential pardon, escorted out of prison by a UNP notable, made an all-island Justice of the Peace, and inducted into the Central Committee of the UNP. In all these cases what were at issue were not double standards, the tribute that vice hypocritically pays to virtue, in which most Governments indulge: they pay obeisance to legal and moral standards while violating them. What was on display was blatant and utter contempt for legal and moral standards. In terms of the theory suggested in the preceding paragraph, ill consequences had to follow. By 1988 the Sri Lankan State was in a state of disintegration.

It is in the long-term perspective that I have sketched out above that we must assess the performance of the present Government. We have certainly come a long way since 1988. Democracy was restored under President Chandrika Kumaratunga, it was breaking down under her successor, and it has been restored again. I would say that the most encouraging fact about the present Government is that it seems to be in the process of firmly entrenching democracy. If that happens we will have Governments under which it will always be possible for the people to enforce corrective action on the wielders of power. Most important is that the people will be able to enforce respect for decent legal and moral norms on the wielders of power who, in Sri Lanka and elsewhere, have a natural propensity to lapse into savagery.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Latest comments

  • 1
    10

    It is a struggle everyday for Jaffna Displaced Muslims languishing in jungles because Tamils don’t allow them to go back home. Same with Singhalese. There were 20,000 or more Singhalese in Jaffna in 1971. Now it is almost zero. Both groups should be resettled in Jaffna.

    It is a struggle everyday for Eastern Muslims to retain what they got from provincial councils. Tamils have the northern provincial council. Why do they demand the eastern province as well? At this rate Tamils will demand all provinces one by one.

    Despite earning most money from Arabic countries, Arabic language is not given its due place in the island. At least Colombo City, Negombo City and Eastern Province should recognize Arabic language officially. It will also improve foreign investments and tourism.

    Saudi and Qatar governments should take up these issues with the Srilankan government.

    • 9
      3

      There are over 100000 Tamils of North east displaced to India by Sinhalese and Muslims and there are thousands and thousands of Tamils displaced in other parts of world well before Muslims displaced from Jaffna. There were Sinhalese in Jaffna in 1971 and they were not displaced not because of Tamils. They ran away from Jaffna to murder the tamils who lived in the South. Today over 150000 Sinhalese live in Jaffna and forcefully occupy the Lands owned by Tamils.
      Why don’t you move to South Arabia and study Arabic there? It is very clear from your statement your aim is similar to ISIS and to capture Srilanka. It makes me to think that whether BBS is right in thinking that Muslims are dangerous to Srilanka.

    • 7
      2

      Tamil Diaspora is earning money in Switzerland; Germany ; France; Denmark; Italy and remitting invaluable FX to Sri Lanka specially to maintain their families in the North, East and Colombo.

      The govt should make German; Swiss; Italian; French; Dutch official languages in Sri Lanka

      In addition half the country is sold to China and Chinese shuld be made a compulsory language

      Fathima take that

      • 2
        0

        Rajash

        What relevance your comments have to the article?

        Beyond that, it is nonsensical assertion.

        Please limit your comments to the issues in the article or write your own pieces with your proper name and photographic identity.

        • 1
          2

          Ayub Khan

          follow the trail…. I am responding to Fathima Fukushima’s nonsensical assertion about Arabic language …with an equal nonsensical assertion.

          so enjoy!

          • 1
            1

            Rajash

            How can you corroborate Arabic language with other languages you have suggested. Your thinking is so cheap and in that you prove yourself a dumbfounded ****t.

            Do something positive, than wasting your time writing nonsense.

            What is your preoccupation other than making foolery comments to pass your idle time?

            • 2
              1

              come on man….your Muslim friend made a nonsensical comment about Arabic language and it’s acceptable to you

              why don you criticise your Muslim friend for making cheap comment about Arabic language

              • 2
                1

                Ayub Khan AKA Fathima?

                you have idle time to read all my comments.

              • 1
                2

                Rajash

                You seriously lack modicum of intelligence.

                • 2
                  1

                  Ayub Khan – you seriously lack common sense!

    • 2
      1

      Fathima Fukushima,

      “It is a struggle everyday for Jaffna Displaced Muslims languishing in jungles because Tamils don’t allow them to go back home.

      Saudi and Qatar governments should take up these issues with the Srilankan government.”

      After deporting Tamils in 1948, DS made a pact, Partners in Fraud”, with Muslim leaders by the MMDA. Sinhala governments have been tearing all pacts, but the MMDA is kept safely only to draw strength from Muslims, not just to go against Tamils, but even for within UNP and SLFP faction. Badiuddin and other Muslim Leaders worked with Sirimavo to abolish the minority protection of Section 29 of Soulbury Constitution. Muslim leadership or the ministers in Old Royal did not congregate when they were sent out demolishing Muslims homes in Colombo. The same old Ministers from Old Royals who were kept partners in crime citing their private crimes is now congregating to threaten Yahapalanaya government demanding to allow them to settle in Northern Sanctuary Lands. Now some of them like Izeth are trying to be philosophically critical on Sinhala Side hiding their fullest cooperation with every government that destroyed the country. I do not think Muslim Leaders and writers, the partners in the crime, has the moral authority to criticize the Sinhala governments, because in all governments after freedom Muslims leaders were/are partners. In fact those were not Sinhala Governments ruled Lankawe, those were Sinhala Muslims governments ruled the Lankawe.

      Sinhalese and Muslims were tearing down the set up Britain and Tamils put together as Ceylon. Even now Muslims leaders are ganging together to stall the constitutional change falsely claiming as IDP Muslims are not allowed to settle in reserved sanctuary lands so they want to withdraw from the government and bring it down. For Sinhalese, this ” The Pet Ram They Brought up feeding is Now Butting on the Masters’ Chest”. Muslims Leader were going to Geneva to make sure that Lankawe will remain as Land of Impunity, while Old Brother Prince was dismantling their Slave Island and other homes in Colombo, including the Slave Island Mosque. Further in Fridays, they were protesting against UN in all Umma Mosques, demanding UN to stay out of Lankawe’s injustice to Tamil minority. We know what happened when the Buddhist Monks opposed killing Cows for Halal meat. They are always partners in crimes. So Muslim will and going to be settled there or somewhere even more controversial places or Saudi Arabia will many worker women’s heads there accusing spreading promiscuity and prostitution in holy land.

      • 1
        1

        All those are irrelevant.

        Jaffna always had Muslims until 1990. They must be resettled in Jaffna. Fullstop.

        We can discuss different versions of history thereafter.

        • 1
          0

          Fathima Fukushima,

          Nobody can deny a person’s right to continue live on his private land. You just putting a blank statement of “Muslims always lived in Jaffna”.

          (UNHCR Report. 2009). In 1990, the LTTE forcibly evicted around 15,000 Muslim families from the Northern Province in five districts: Jaffna 3,475, Mannar 8,200, Vavuniya 1,800, Mulaitheevu 1,000 and Kilinochi 525 (Ibid. 2009).

          https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/resettlement-of-muslim-idps-issues-of-wilpattu/

          That means only 3500 families can go to Jaffna. Only 15,000 for the entire province. One month ago NPC released 24,800 Muslim are resettled in Jaffna. But 1 lakh Tamils are in TN waiting without houses to come back. Could you get out illegally settled guys out of there so the refugees in TN can come back to houses?

          Family means parents and unmarried children under 18. Family doesn’t mean 15,000 princes and Princesses in Saudi Arabia. That means if LTTE has put out one guy, then with one family you run out of your entire quota. Put that in your burqa head Fathima.(man change your Tamil spelling to Arabic- Fatimah – you study Arabic before implement it in Lankawe. )

          If you have great grandchildren you have to buy lands for them. No free land for them. Further if you have already obtained land in Yarla from Sothern Province, you have no right to claim back you Wilpattu land from Northern Province. Don’t play double crossing to me also that you played to LTTE.

          Hey Fathi – tell me the truth… How many of your great grands are already married? How many of them are illegal like Saudi Royals? Fathi can I ask you a question? Your cousin sister slept with lion. With which one you slept so that you want to go to Wilpattu jungle?

          Don’t acts like a big minor Fathi. That is silly.

    • 1
      1

      recognize Arabic?? a small country like ours having 3 main languages are more than adequate to portray that there are different cultural folks living here. after all I say that your comments are utterly rubbish, that’s because as a Muslim I see no need to have Arabic as a language in this country and hence it serves no purpose.. one must understand that we live in a multi cultural country and we need to try and adjust to the ways means of this country and not try to dictate the natural law of this land..

    • 1
      2

      Fathima learnt a lesson from the divisive politics of Sri Lanka and trying to practice it.

      • 1
        1

        you are no better

        see your comment below which Sinhalese!

        • 1
          2

          All those mentioned have different ways of life. That is the reality. So, if to integrate which one to choose. That is the question.

          • 0
            1

            I don’t think anyone wants to integrate with people like you. so keep away.

          • 1
            0

            Mohamed Marzook – UK

            ” So, if to integrate which one to choose. That is the question.”

            What do you mean by integration?

            Please take a deep breath then tell us your version of integration.

            • 1
              1

              Native : I think Mohamed Marzook – UK is confusing with intercourse

              • 1
                0

                Rajash

                I like to see your face to judge your type of intercourse.

                You are damn rot and racist in these column.

          • 1
            0

            Mohamed Marzook

            This fake Rajash is a big BONDA. Don’t waste your time with him. He is degenerated such to a scale that he hates the Muslims outright. He is a Horri Balla.

  • 1
    0

    ‘I would say that the most encouraging fact about the present Government is that it seems to be in the process of firmly entrenching democracy. If that happens we will have Governments under which it will always be possible for the people to enforce corrective action on the wielders of power. Most important is that the people will be able to enforce respect for decent legal and moral norms on the wielders of power who, in Sri Lanka and elsewhere, have a natural propensity to lapse into savagery.’Quote.

    OMG! what a sense of logic that spins and a make believe yarn is this article ? Surely a highly commendable fete in the art of journalism. Let’s forget about the ground reality and feelings of the suppressed and the oppressed:, a lame and crippled judiciary impotent of delivering fair and just justice which is a sine qua non for a true Democracy. I wonder where we are living.!

  • 3
    0

    Mr Hussain is as usual perceptive. He traces the moral decline starting with 1956, citing other landmark dates. He however omits 1972, the year of the shortsighted “true independence”, compromising the secular state, and the destruction of the public service. This does not detract from the value of what he modestly labels “no more than a few notes”.

    • 3
      0

      HLS – thanks for your comment. Periodisation can be tricky.1970 to 1977 can be seen as a continuation, a maturation, of trends that began in 1956.Or it can be seen as a new period for several reasons. The LSSP which for most of the period from 1956 to 1965 did everything possible to sabotage the SLFP came together with it in a big way in 1970. Marxist internationalism was forgotten and identity politics reigned supreme. I have heard it said that finally what really mattered for Colvin was his caste and nothing else.The economy became more socialist than in any other non-Communist Afro-Asian country except perhaps for Sekou Toure’s Guinea.And so on.
      If the Government changes now, we can be sure that we will be having the same sort of gripes in a couple of years.Therefore we must try to get at the fundamental reasons why Sri Lanka’s performance has been so far below expectations since 1948.The explanation has to be found in cultural factors. I have focused on the moral factor. – IH

      • 2
        0

        Izeth Hussain

        “Therefore we must try to get at the fundamental reasons why Sri Lanka’s performance has been so far below expectations since 1948.The explanation has to be found in cultural factors. I have focused on the moral factor. – IH”

        Thanks for the perceptive articles and the succinct above comment.

        “Identifying the problem, is 95% of the solution” said Bertrand Russell.

        Have all the problems that afflict the Land of Native Veddah Aethho, occupied by the Paras been identified?

        You say cultural factors? There are more factors. you need to write another article in these factors,

        1. Average National IQ of 79. Compare that to Singapore, 108. South Korea 106, and Japan 105.

        You say cultural factors. Para-Sinhala Threveda Buddhism Vs. Mahayana Buddhism?

        National IQ Scores – Country Rankings

        http://www.photius.com/rankings/national_iq_scores_country_ranks.html

        2. Secularism and Separation of Church and State.

        3. Racism, and the lies of Monk Mahanama in the Mahawamsa, coupled with the hegemony of the Monks, and their use by the politicians.

        4. IQ and the Wealth of Nations

        The result reveals that Hong Kong has the highest national IQ estimate, followed by South Korea.

        Central to the book’s thesis is a tabulation of what Lynn and Vanhanen believe to be the average IQs of the world’s nations. Rather than do their own IQ studies, the authors average and adjust existing studies and use other methods to create estimates.

        For 104 of the 185 nations, no studies were available. In those cases, the authors have used an estimated value by taking averages of the IQs of neighboring or comparable nations. For example, the authors arrived at a figure of 84 for El Salvador by averaging their calculations of 79 for Guatemala and 88 for Colombia. Including those estimated IQs, the correlation of IQ and GDP is 0.62.

        To obtain a figure for South Africa, the authors averaged IQ studies done on different ethnic groups, resulting in a figure of 72. The figures for Colombia, Peru, and Singapore were arrived at in a similar manner.
        In some cases, the IQ of a country is estimated by averaging the IQs of countries that are not actually neighbors of the country in question. For example, Kyrgyzstan’s IQ is estimated by averaging the IQs of Iran and Turkey, neither of which is close to Kyrgyzstan—China, which is a geographic neighbor, is not counted as such by Lynn and Vanhanen. This is because ethnic background is assumed to be more important than proximity to other nations when determining national IQ.

        To account for the Flynn effect (an increase in IQ scores over time), the authors adjusted the results of older studies upward by a number of points.

        Map depicting average IQ values as presented in the follow-up book, IQ and Global Inequality.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IQ_and_the_Wealth_of_Nations#/media/File:National_IQ_per_country_-_estimates_by_Lynn_and_Vanhanen_2006.png

        • 2
          0

          Amarasiri – thanks very much for the material on IQ. I must think more about it. As you know IQ has been a highly controversial subject for many decades.- IH

          • 2
            0

            Izeth Hussain

            “As you know IQ has been a highly controversial subject for many decades.- IH”

            Yes.

            The Earth rotating on its own axis, and orbiting the Sun was also a controversial subject for many centuries after Copernicus, and still 25% of American, 34% of Europeans and perhaps 50% or more in the developing world believes that the Sun sun goes around the Earth, but the truth is the same.

            1 In 4 Americans Thinks The Sun Goes Around The Earth, Survey Says

            http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2014/02/14/277058739/1-in-4-americans-think-the-sun-goes-around-the-earth-survey-says

  • 2
    0

    Izeth Hussain

    RE: Two Years After

    “Two years after the January 2015 General Elections – which I and some others hailed as a Revolution -there is widespread disillusionment about the present Government.”

    And Two Years After, President Sirisena has earned several titles, Turncoat, Traitor, Gna, Mala-Peretaya, and Sevalaya from many of the 6.2 mullion voters who voted for him.

    “It is in the long-term perspective that I have sketched out above that we must assess the performance of the present Government. We have certainly come a long way since 1988. Democracy was restored under President Chandrika Kumaratunga, it was breaking down under her successor, and it has been restored again. ”

    How did it happen within 2 years? Is it the low IQ of the elected politicians, or the greed and stupidity of the polititians?

  • 1
    3

    Is there part 2 / 3 / 4 /5 as its customary in your writings????

    By the way, at the beginning you wrote:

    which I and some others….

    Shouldn’t it be:

    some others and I ???

    Always puts himself first, this Izeth !

    • 0
      0

      Perriamama

      “Is there part 2 / 3 / 4 /5 as its customary in your writings????”

      Izeth Hussein is disclosing things a lot of people do not know. So, we all should welcome parts 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 etc.

      Copernicus , Galileo, Kepler, Newton and Foucault disclosed and demonstrated that the Earth spins and moves around the Sun. However, still 25% of american, 34% of the Europeans and perhaps well over 50% of the paras in the Land of Native Veddah Aethho, believes that the Sun goes around the Earth.

      Izeth Hussein has his work cut out for him to “educate’ the Paras.

      http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2014/02/14/277058739/1-in-4-americans-think-the-sun-goes-around-the-earth-survey-says

      1 In 4 Americans Thinks The Sun Goes Around The Earth, Survey Says

  • 1
    0

    On the 8th of January 2015, Sri Lanka jumped from the frying pan to the fire, thanks largely to the machinations of various internal and external forces with their own agendas for our Island home. It was an event of revolutionary proportion to those embittered and disillusioned by the MR Government. Democracy they claimed has been restored again.

    What a joke !!

    The stench of corruption, abuse of office, nepotism, lawlessness and other related offences is so strong after just two years, that it is obvious to all but the most obstinate that the Yahapalanaya Government is coming apart at the seams as it commences it’s third year in office. That this would happen was inevitable, given the fact that the only factor that the ‘revolutionaries’ had in common was their mutual desire to remove MR & his Government in order to achieve their respective personal political goals and definitely not for the good of the country.

    Continuing to whitewash the Yahapalanaya Government only serves to throw into focus more sharply the fact that their brand of democracy is no better or worse than that of the previous regime – only different.

  • 1
    0

    It is not easy to turnaround the administration after the great 10 years of misrule. Corruption has been planted more effectively and even a genuine man cannot escape from this episode. Most of the people in position and power are not happy with what they get legitimately. So they need extras!

    Nevertheless one most appreciable point is democracy and freedom is more evident than 2 years ago. You can realise from numerous protests marches in Colombo practically everyday.

  • 0
    0

    Naming the change that took place on 8th January 2015 as a ‘Revolution’. In political usage the word refers to a ‘complete change of the system’. It did not happen on the 08th. A frustrated people went for a change of faces, sometimes the old in new garb; and they were misled. The change must come as it would be in ‘cultivating chena on the ashes of the burnt down jungle’. Small plants cannot grow among thickly grown MARA trees. The MARA trees need to be completely destroyed.

  • 0
    0

    Not many positives the past 2-years but worth mentioning would the 19th amendment along with slightly better civil liberties compared to MR’s dictatorship. No white-vans for the moment. On a day-to-day basis the introduction of the 1990 ambulance service was a smart thing to do.

    But overall, the report card average would be either a D+ or C-.

  • 1
    1

    IZETH, WHY CANNOT THE MUSLIMS INTEGRATE WITH THE SINHALESE. I F YOU WANT TO SPEAK DIFFERENTLY,DRESS DIFFERENTLY AND WANT TO CREATE LAWS NOT COMMON WITH SRILANKANS , YOU WILL ALWAYS BE CLASHING WITH THE REST OF THE COUNTRY

    • 1
      0

      Which Sinhalese; Sinhala Buddhists, Sinhala Christians, Westernised Sinhalese, Gamey Sinhalese or the Chinese Sinhalese?

    • 0
      0

      Abey,
      Muslims have integrated well in this country. They are in all parts of the country,and most Muslims are proficient
      in all three languages. Just ignore this Fukushima’s comment about Arabic.All Muslims learn Arabic without which
      they cannot practice their religion. Arabic is a language of the United Nations.
      This Fukushima must have been washed ashore here after Tsunami, or the Nuclear Disaster in Japan.
      We have our own customs dress ,and other matters which we like to practice as much other communities
      Civilized behaviour demands we respect each other and their rights and customs..
      We have all got on very well ,until the rise of the BBS. .let us forget what has happened forgive each other and
      go forward as one country ,one people, while retaining our own religion and customs. Unity in diversity is possible
      Further I wish to say that we should not have communal or racial parties.
      We must be in the mainstream political parties like UNP, SLFP, JVP, ETC.,
      We can have communal organizations for promotion of our education and cultural activities.

  • 1
    0

    That also sound racist.

    which Muslim are you Suuni? Shiite? Sufi? Kharijite? etc

    The narrow mindness of Sri Lankans is like a dangerous cocktail

    after 30 years of war the country more polarised than ever

    • 0
      1

      I am a ‘MUSLIM’. That is all. There may be other identifications according to different thinking like among the Leftists such as Marxists, Troskysts, Maoists,etc. etc.

      • 1
        2

        Mohamed Marzook – UK – ” I am a Muslim”.
        No “you are a waste of time”

        • 0
          0

          Mohamed Marzook

          It looks like this BONDA Rajesh has some personal grudges against you. Who is he?

  • 3
    2

    As usual, Izeth Hussain is hiding the trump card!

    For honesty’s sake, we must point out the truth without any intentions of inciting communal hatred or violence.

    Certainly we do not wish to violate the CT comments Policy.

    Here is that view.

    Through all the changes he is referring to, there is one major change in Sri Lanka’s ethnic composition and economic texture, together with the rise of religious extremism. All that involved the Muslim community.

    ‘district basis’, Muslims with just three simple passes were entering the unis since 1970. And the Jaffna Tamil youth started their violent campaign against the Sinhalese, misunderstanding that it was a Sinhala ploy!

    Through the civil war then, Muslims played on both sides, especially infiltrating the military intelligence systems. Pirapakaran of course, took revenge by expelling them from Jaffna and by massacres in the East.

    The beneficiaries of the Tamil and Sinhala mass emigration were the Muslims. They bought all the residential and business properties being sold by the Tamils and Sinhalese from Galle Face to up to about Ratmalana. Today, entire lanes in Kollupitiya nad Bambalapitiya are populated 100% by Muslims.

    Together with this trend, Wahabists financed Islamic extremism grew with the hijab beginning to appear at all the universities and madrasas from Town Hall to Peliyagoda.

    Mustapha’s gerrymandering is designed to convert these gains in to political advantage.

    We wish the Muslims well in the future.

    • 2
      1

      Pena Kiyanna,
      Let me inform you that Temple Trees and Mumtaz Mahal and Sri Kotha in Kollupitiya were owned by Muslims.
      and it was owned by one family.,from British Times. Then you have Gaffoor Buildings ,Macan Markar ,Bristol Building in Fort all owned by Muslims
      You idiots cannot progress because you are jealous of the enterprising Muslim Businessmen and the Tamils
      too are hardworking .
      When you started attacking Tamils in Colombo, it is a fact that Muslims bought many houses. So what ?
      It is about time you lazy buggers got working. Muslims did not rob. But you fellows have certainly done that
      It is a bloody waste of time to be educating you fellows.
      Stop talking about extremism as Intelligence reports proved the Justice and Buddhist affairs Minister a liar.
      Our women wore modest clothing from ancient times. You damned perverts want us to follow your women
      Fifty years ago, there were even curtains in cars when our women went about. You can call it anything we don’t care.
      Your village women who have come to town are now wearing tight pants and T Shirt ,which exposes their bulging
      breasts and Buttocks too.It was only a day ago I read of a man who was hauled up for patting a woman on her buttocks.
      Just read today’s paper and you will see about underage boy eloping, and other sex crimes.
      I will tell you that with your Independance you got only a flag and anthem. No comment about Flag !!!

  • 2
    1

    Pena Kiyanna

    you people doesn’t believe in a God, but doesn’t it say anywhere in your philosophy or whatever you follow that lying and distorting facts without proof is wrong, is lying a virtue in your belief system.

    Kulupitiya to Bambalapitia lanes were predominantly Muslims from the 1930s, this didn’t happen yesterday or today, and not only Colombo but all the main cities, they have to because they were a trading community.

    If someone is becoming successful, that means they must be doing something good, isn’t that what Karma teaches you, unless of course karma is wrong. So stop being jealous of others and see what you can learn from them and become successful. Do good be good.

Leave A Comment

Comments should not exceed 300 words. Embedding external links and writing in capital letters are discouraged. Commenting is automatically shut off on articles after 10 days and approval may take up to 24 hours. Please read our Comments Policy for further details. Your email address will not be published.