27 October, 2021

Blog

What’s In A Professorial Title? ‘Little Things’ Matter

By Nimal Chandrasena

Dr. Nimal Chandrasena

When the country is caught up in a death spiral (massive-scale corruption, stealing people’s assets and heritage, political chicanery, murder and mayhem, human rights abuses, thuggery, poverty, malnutrition and covid – in that order of importance), one might ask why the author should worry about ‘little things’ about which only the educated elite, arguably, need to be mindful about. But ‘little things’ DO MATTER!

The honorific academic title “Professor” in Sri Lanka is confusing and misleading even reasonably educated professionals. Many of my friends, well-educated professionals in varied fields, refer to some individuals in Sri Lanka, especially those in the Parliament and other endeavours, “He is a Professor”. The implication, pure and simple, is, “they, who are Professors, should know the stuff”!

This assumption people make is conjecture and often completely wrong. Most ‘professors’ may know their chosen fields of study quite well, but they may lack expertise in other areas and the common sense to admit that. Many step out to speak about matters about which they have really no profound grasp. Others are pretenders of knowledge. Only the well-trained have the integrity and honesty to stick to what they know and apply some degree of restraint and discretion when speaking about matters outside their expertise.

I say ‘little things matter’ because of the recent trend of ALL media referring to various individuals as “professors” in Parliament or elsewhere, holding important portfolios. As far as I could recall (I could be corrected here), Stanley Kalpage, the former University Grants Commission (UGC) Chairman (1977-1988 or near), was a Senator in a previous incarnation (since early-1960s). He was often referred to as “Professor Kalpage” within the University circles and outside.

Nowadays, G.L. Peiris, Tissa Vitrana and Channa Jayasumana, parliamentarians, are often in the news, referred to invariably with the title “professor”. W.D Laksman, now discarded Central Bank Governor, has always been referred to with the professorial title. Apart from them, many other individuals also appear to be presenting themselves in the media as ‘professors’. I assume they have earned their colours through the existing UGC system in Sri Lanka or equivalent systems in other countries. I hope they are not pretenders.

The Sri Lanka media appears to keep referring to a few political ‘professorial’ people with another adjective added – calling them ‘senior professor’. The references galore, these days, given the debates on fertilizer and pesticide bans, organic agriculture and other topics that fall within the scientific realms. The references may also fall in different spheres of endeavour (humanities, arts, culture and finance).

The previous Governor of the Central Bank, discarded last month as useless, was also continually projected using his previously-held title ‘professor’. The implication was that he might get the country out of the financial mess we have. Perhaps, he might have – if he had been allowed to do his job for a sustained period! W.D. Lakshman, whom I knew well at the Colombo University, at least would have added an iota of respectability to the highly-tainted Central Bank Governor role. In my view, he should never have accepted the position in the first place at the age of around 78 or 79, to be thrown out at 80 years. He was indeed a very senior genuine ‘professor’ and also a former Vice-Chancellor of Colombo University. What a shame? ‘If you lie with dogs, you will get up having ticks’, and there isn’t much we can do except commiserate with the good gentleman.

The indifferent way the title is used seems to perpetuate the myth that the person referred to as ‘professor’ knows everything and will guide the nation’s future correctly. Hardly the truth, needless to say. But I am more concerned about a system that perpetuates the above myth, and a not too intelligent media, broadly, using the title referring to questionable individuals. Globally, the procedures for becoming elevated by academic merit to a ‘professorship’ are well-established. Sri Lanka is no exception. We also do have a system. However, even a cursory examination will find the bar to jump is quite low within the Sri Lankan UGC schemes.

Dubiously using this time-honoured title referring to parliamentarians produces a rather negative worldview. Although many people do not realize it, the world is watching as Sri Lanka goes through probably one of the most traumatic periods in its history. Make no mistake – The quality of Sri Lanka’s administrative and educational systems, as well as socio-economic and civil society functioning, are presently under severe scrutiny. In many countries, the media would have sorted out the chaff from the wheat by now.

A somewhat confusing title called “Senior Professor” also evolved within the University administration in Sri Lanka in the new millennium. Some Australian academics have asked me who these people are. Correct me if I am wrong – but my answer has been that they are recognized by Sri Lanka’s University Grants Commission as ‘seniors’ service-wise, rather than academic brilliance.

The UGC Circular No. 05/2015 issued on 28 May 2015 appears to be the latest in this regard, and, again, that’s the best information I have. One who has reached the status of a “professor” by merit or by filling a cadre position needs to serve a minimum of 8 years in that position. There is a second requirement – 20 publications in ‘indexed journals. This is really baffling. One has to assume that the ‘professor’ already has those and plenty more! The circular does not stipulate the said 20 publications should be ‘post-professor’. See the confusion? It beggars belief that such anomalies continue to date unchallenged.

A comparable situation is hard to find. The Australian framework for attaining an ‘Associate Professor’ or ‘Professor’ status simply cannot be compared. The Australians, as in other developed countries, ask for evidence of outstanding and unquestionable academic contributions and peers’ recognition.

In other words, brilliant scholarly contributions via book chapters, keynote addresses, participation in expert panels, and the like, coupled with students’ recognition for teaching and guidance. The elevation to a position of ‘professor’ is also anchored by the proof of a significant number of papers published in “peer-reviewed” global journals, not just “indexed journals”.

Often, the numbers of peer-reviewed articles are well more than 150 and, in some cases, in the 300-400 range or more. Anyone can check the profile of an outstanding scholar from outside Sri Lanka to verify this. I must note that some such distinguished scholars are indeed Sri Lankans by birth. Some are world-renowned, brightly shining stars in an otherwise gloomy Sri Lankan sky! I can name quite a few.

Those of us who are Journal editors know that any “predatory journal” can get indexation by paying money. That’s a topic for another day and time, but the Sri Lankan UGC appears to be unaware of this. When Mohan De Silva was UGC Chairman a few years back, I tried to raise the issue to no avail.

The Sri Lankan system should also study the extraordinary improvements that have been made by our neighbour – India and its UGC. In this regard, we should get some help from ‘big brother’ India. Publishing in dubious “indexed” journals is not enough to recognize merit, peer acknowledgement and global standing. India stopped recognizing publications of its academics in predatory publications 2-3 years ago.

My point is a weighty category like ‘senior professor’ is not common in the systems we generally follow in other educational matters, i.e. the American, British Commonwealth countries, European or Australia-New Zealand systems. I don’t think our Sri Lankan UGC will change this terminology. It’s simply not the way the government operates. Still, it does not stop me from wondering why those diligent academics on the island, including previous vice-chancellors and the like, have not brought this matter up for UGC to consider.

More importantly, media and other commentators and the public need to be aware that the title “senior professor” reflects the length of service than academic achievements. In some countries, seniority in service is simply recognized by administrative classes – Grade I, Grade II or, in Australia – Level D (Associate Professor), Level E (Professor) and the like. If Sri Lanka’s education system, once the envy of the developing world, expects recognition globally, it needs to revamp these dubious terms and make them more meaningful. Needless to say, the criteria for recognizing academic achievements should be much higher and on par with at least India.

Some people, including a few relatives, have asked me, after I left academia in 1993, whether I retain my title “Associate Professor”, which I earned by merit through the then UGC’s system in 1990. My answer has been and always will be – a resounding “NO”. I prefer to be referred to as a “Dr.” reflecting a real academic qualification. As I moved out of academia into other positions, it would have been silly to be continually called a “professor”. However, that didn’t stop some of my closest Sri Lankan friends, including some Australians, from calling me ‘professor’ more as an endearing term.

In the USA, the title “professor” is used only in academia, generally in oral address – as a courtesy given by others– rather than used by you in writing or when presenting one’s own name. Those in Sri Lanka who use the title “professor” as authors of books and reports to entice readers should ponder this unsavoury habit. There are many books where authors, perhaps, are encouraged by publishers to use the title. It is totally unnecessary to sell books in this way. It places Sri Lanka in a poor light among global readers.

A ‘retired professor’ or someone who vacated a post as a ‘professor’ like me should not use the title. The world’s best practice is to fall back to one’s highest tertiary degree qualification – either a Doctorate or a Masters degree. A student or others may still refer to or greet you as a “professor”. There is no harm in it. Within our culture, it shows respect, courtesy, and perhaps even deference to someone who might have taught you something at a particular moment. Our value system, within all beliefs and faiths, places parents, elders and teachers at the top of any scale of reverence.

As I said initially, when Sri Lanka is gripped with a financial crisis, many other problems and Covid, some may argue it is anachronistic to discuss these ‘professorial’ titles. But fixing these ‘little things’ go a long way in winning back the prestige Sri Lanka once enjoyed in the world.

The constant reference by concerned people and media commentators to various ‘pseudo experts’ as ‘professors’ is the crucial issue here. I blame the media also for not being investigative enough to expose the pretenders. Some who believe in “Natha Deviyo” to find solutions to society’s problems, “Dhammika Paniya” for Covid, and similar deceptive conduct are hardly worth the title “professor”.

The matter I raise shows that as a country, we are far backward in every way than the public realizes. Unless corrected in some way, advice received from questioningly qualified people could also mislead the country’s future trajectories not just in organic farming, fertilizer bans and finance but in other fields, such as history, natural resources, and heritage protection.

It is time to wake up.

*Dr. Nimal Chandrasena – The author is a former Associate Professor of Botany by Merit (Weed Science), University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. He obtained his Ph.D. in Weed Science (1983) from the School of Plant Biology, University of North Wales, Bangor, U.K. He is domiciled in Australia and has served in various governmental positions and functioned as a Principal Scientist in several global Consulting firms. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the international Journal – Weeds.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Latest comments

  • 4
    0

    What beats me is that Prof: Lakshman with his attainments was unable to see through the Rajapakses. Viyath Maga and what it stood for blinded him.

    Professor, Senior Professor, Professor Emeritus etc etc is capped up with a new title
    Professors Professor. Reader Nimal Fernando identified this new variant.

  • 12
    1

    At least these dubious titles makes Lanka, as most educated parliament in the world ( almost majority seems to have title without schooling). Though worthless, currently the only title not duplicated in Lanka are PM and President. Other than that we have Prof/Doctor – Shavendra, SW , Kamal, Wimal (retired), Gotha, Mahinda, Namal, Basil, Shiranthi, Cabraaaal, Admiral Prof – – – . But then again people who earned their title like GLP is worse than a retard.

    • 9
      0

      Viyathmaga my foot, is full of it. All kind of dubious titles and characters . The real people have left the country years ago.. Few who returned were so disappointed decided to quit altogether or retire. What you have now is contaminated, fake, frauds, politically corrupt and demented. Lanka gives titles, as in printing money. Both depreciated, so badly worth only to wipe ____.

  • 16
    0

    What a sad image for Sri Lanka when Colombage’s and Jayasumana’s profess to be Professors.

    • 2
      0

      Neither of these can claim to be professors. The rule is that one has to serve 15 years as professor and the University should confer the title “Emeritus Professor” Therefore these two gentlemen cannot use the title professor.

  • 14
    1

    I think special mention must be made about “Professor” Channa Jayasumana the genius (?) in charge of drug supply, and the inimitable “Admiral Professor” Foreign Secretary.
    Only in Sri Lanka do these titles carry any weight. Even musicians like to flaunt their “Visharada” title.
    Angela Merkel was a research scientist, but doesn’t even use “Dr.” in her name.

  • 5
    1

    The writer says: “If you lie with dogs you get up with ticks”. Leave aside a “Professor”, even an average intelligent person knows this truth. But did “Professor” W.D. Lakshman, with all his “Professional” career background and years and years of experience in the chosen field and Heading the Highest seat of learning (a University) was “ABLE” to “Assess” the “Capacity” and “Capabilities” of the candidate he chose and supported to be the “President” of the country? In his own admission, he joined the main organization that selected the candidate “GR” viz. the “VIYATHMAGA” and contributed his expertise in formulating the economic “Policy” of the “Saubagye Dekma”. It took nearly two years for him to “Learn” that he faulted in making that “Choice” and also to learn that many “Vultures” were his associates whom he was compelled to work with.

    This amply proves that a “Professor” qualification or as a matter of fact “Higher Learning” is not the only or the main criteria for “Performance” in a given field. With those “Tools” in your hand, it is a must “Capability” to “See”, “Evaluate”, and “Forecast” the “Environmental” factors not forgetting with “WHOM” you are going to work. The “average” person whom I mentioned work with a different tool called “Intuition” and succeed well. But unfortunately, our “Professors” have lost that tool, “Intuition” and “Common Sense” in the process of achieving “Academic Qualifications”..

    • 2
      0

      Dear Simon.
      So true.
      University is like a forge to cast a model for a start. But to add the temper and sharpness to that tool and the finishing of rough edges, one’s use of your own intuitions and intellect, will make that tool to really perform best in the world at large. There are exceptions – prodigies – like a few being very good at maths before even 10 years or musicians who perform in formative years, but these are exceptions often found in the diversity of Nature.
      In fact, even though trained as a legal mind, Lakshman Kadir’s intellect and sincerity made him arguably our best politician of his time. Compare him with another decrepit Law Professor still hanging on but achieved nothing but seen his stature drop to zero.
      Professor title is for show and really to impress the ‘undiscerning’.

      • 1
        0

        Very good points. WD was always poor in making “judgements” as far as I recall. We, in Science, interacted with him, in Arts, quite a lot during a sustained period prior to 1993. “Capability”, “Courage” and “Commitment” were missing. But as I said in the article, a decent human being. Just “ineffective”.

    • 0
      0

      Sorry – It is me the writer replying as “The Weedy One” (I am a Weed Scientist!).
      Very good points. WD was always poor in making “judgements” as far as I recall. We, in Science, interacted with him, in Arts, quite a lot during a sustained period prior to 1993. “Capability”, “Courage” and “Commitment” were missing. But as I said in the article, a decent human being. Just “ineffective”.

  • 8
    0

    “Nowadays, G.L. Peiris, Tissa Vitrana and Channa Jayasumana, parliamentarians, are often in the news, referred to invariably with the title “professor”.” Dr. Chandrasena
    Only G.L. out of this lot is Professor Emeritus and entitled to use the term and be called “Professor”. Tissa Vitarana was a Professor for a few years only and therefore not appointed Professor Emeritus. Channa Jayasumana was an Associate Professor at the time he was elected. So, Vitarana and Jayasumana cannot use the title “Professor”. Some time back a Colombo Telegraph reader commenting on some article related the story of Carlo Fonseka who was referred to as Professor soon after he retired. Carlo then said he was “Dr. Fonseka” now after retirement. Then someone asked him whether he was not entitled to use the title as he was a Senior Professor for more than 10 years. Carlo then said “Yes, but the University Senate has to formally appoint me and until then I cannot use the title”. Such was the humility of the man.

    • 3
      0

      As far as I know, only G>L has high-level academic writings and contributions that would make him a “Professor” in any country. Those days, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, he used to travel to Britain and other countries as a regular invitee on Lecture Tours. I admired him greatly as an Academic. I also claim to be one of his “confidants” those days. However, he has made a huge mistake in continuing to serve corrup governments. The first insult came actually from Chandrika who called him “..some Professors come to me like dogs with tail between the legs..”. What an insult? I remember him telling me in June 1993 that he would quit the Vice-Chancellorship and join politics. He had noble goals in his mind those days.
      Tissa Vitharan, another “victim”, made his choices (bad). He was one of the first to teach me “Virology” at the MRI, back in 1975. Despite a distinguished career in Medical (Virology) research, I don’t think he has written or contributed enough to his field of study to be appointed a “Professor”. Those things don’t seem to matter in SL. In his case, leftist, socialist politics became his lifelong passion. It is not too late for him to quit even now. He must be nearly 90 years old now.
      Regarding Jayasimana, the less we write, the better it is for our sanity.

  • 7
    0

    Excellent article.
    We have in excess of 2,000 PhDs in the university system. But only a handful will be invited to sit on a board of a private company or a company listed on the Colombo Stock Excahnge. Why is that?

    • 1
      0

      A tragic country – isn’t it? I am assuming you are right in SL having 2000 Ph>D.s currently in the University system. Did you mean the number of current staff with Ph.D.s? Even if the number is correct, the greater majority have no clue on where the world is in relation to where their chosen “field of Expertise” is. I say that because, from my Fields- Botany, Weed Science, Ecology and Environmental Science and related other disciplines (broadly, Plant Science), I see very few contributions (ZERO would better describe it!) from SL. It was a topic we discussed in 2013 “Global Forum”, which was organized by the National Science Council, under Tissa Vitharana. Not much “follow-up” happened in making us (SL) better known in the world of science or any other subject. We all appear to be “victims” in one way or another!

  • 7
    0

    Reader Jayasiri Samarakoon is correct in asserting that the title “Professor” is only valid and appropriate as an honorific for one currently in academia and having earned the title via academic merit.

    The moment such a person leaves academia, they would cease using the title, unless they have been formally awarded the title “Professor Emeritus” or “Emeritus Professor.” I recall Former Prof of Zoology, Mahes Laduwahetty, writing in a local rag several years ago, about this.

    However, in our dear land like no other, bogus buffoons such as Jayanath Colombage, and pathetic racists like Channa Jayasumana are encouraged to flaunt the title, so as to give bogus respectability to the quintuple R-regime and valiantly try to smooth out the “academic average” in the legislature with hocus-pocus.

    The picture will, of course be remedied when “Double PhD” Chichy Rocket Rohitha becomes a parliamentarian, and Admiral Professor in waiting, Yoshitha comes along for the ride, armed with a spanking new PhD and instant professorship from the KDU. Ah, and don’t forget Nandasena’s assertion at one of his Gama Samaga Pilisadara lectures about him having sufficient “academic merit” to earn a “double PhD”.

  • 4
    0

    Minor point. “Professor” as a title if different from “professor’ as a term of greeting, especially in the US.
    “Hi prof” is common in US campuses even when addressing teachers who never held a Chair.
    Also apart from Emeritus, ‘Life Professorships’ are awarded in some countries.

    • 1
      0

      I think I made my point. It is just a term used in the USA and a few other countries in addressing a teacher. However, in SL and many South and South-Esat Asian countries, the title is a weighty one, abused by unqualified people. The gut-less and ineffective UGC in SL corrupted the system during the past two decades. People like GL sat back and did nothing when this insidious form of “corruption” crept into Higher Education. However, the well-informed Media and investigative journalists should be smart enough to “weed” these pretenders out! I encourage them to do so…

  • 3
    0

    In the old days, we had only one university and professors were greatly respected. Now we have several going into around 70 which means that we will have so many hundreds of dubious professors in mysterious subjects. we would need someone with a PhD in weed science to weed out these false professors. Some like the Admiral Professor give talks over Zoom and expose their lack of quality to the whole world. Some have published only in Sinhala and Tamil but the system cannot, after getting them to teach in these languages, deny them promotions. There are few publication outlets and fewer still to review their works.We have progressively dismantled our systems. We have had a succession of unlearned Chief Justices, some corrupt and unlearned in the law. Why not unlearned Professors?

    • 0
      0

      Please read my reply above. Thanks.

  • 8
    0

    A very timely article, given that SL now has some of the highest titles awarded to not just university teachers with distinction, track record and status but especially in military titles. For example, the United States has a vast military with far superior firepower and range than perhaps several of the second-tier militaries like Russia, China or the UK combined. Yet, it is not commanded by a Field Marshal. Sri Lanka has an “air-force” that consists of a few ageing fighter jets and some helicopters. Yet its commander is Marshal of the Air and the navy, using some old boats with guns mounted on them has an Admiral of the Fleet. It is in this context that we have a title called “Athigaru” when the country’s president is mentioned by his ring of helpers in the kitchen cabinet. Likewise, the chief monks in the main chapters of Buddhist clergy are “Athipoojyer Agger Mahaa Pandither” etc. The kings of historical times past would have had titles depicting the sun and stars as well. So it it no wonder that two-bit academics with not much substance insist on being referred to by hallowed honorifics while the scoundrel infesting parliament are still called “Honorable”.

  • 2
    0

    I am “The Weedy One” – the author of the article. Thanks to all readers who have respectfully commented. I have provided a few additional thoughts to the conversation we are having.

  • 4
    0

    GOOD ARTICLE. Like everything else in Sri Lanka running to dogs, academia no exception. Few years ago, I have seen in Two Presidential Elections, all the Vice Chancellors come to TV and say Vote for Mr X. So where is academic independence, if the Vice Chancellors are politicised?
    It is hilarious, if you look at every university academic staff list, Professors outnumber lecturers. Some have 10 to 13 Professors in a single Department. Old days we had One Professor in a Dept and it was referred to as the Chair. Old days,to be a Professor, you needed 10-15 International Publications. Now Every University Faculty has a Journal. Every local “professional” association has a Journal and conductes conferences. University A staff writes a paper in University B Journal and Vice Versa. Papers are accepted without a question. University A graduate Registers for a quick Ph.D. from Local University B and vice versa. So we have factories turning out Local Ph.D.s and Local Professors/ Senior Professors. So every TV chat show, media voice cut, News article it is a “Professor/Senior Professor/ Doctor”.

    • 1
      0

      There was one person at Peradeniya Agriculture faculty whose application was rejected by the selection committee. Then this person started a journal in his own speciality and published several articles in the first issue and then he was appointed professor in the next round. University journals and proceedings at academic sessions do not provide the academic calibre of a person. I am aware of one who did not have a single publication got the post only from abstracts at meetings, He was called the “abstract professor”. I think at least in science based faculties h index is a suitable quantity to be used. The current merit promotion scheme should be amended as a top priority.

      • 0
        0

        I can’t guess who that is. I used to teach Weed Science at the PGIA as a Visting Lecture. I know the Instutute and some Departments well. Regarding H-Index, yes, it is one measure of a solid academic record; it is relatively new; the number of citations of a person are worked out by algorithms. These algorithms often MISS Book Chapters and others, which are still useful contributions of an individual. There are possibly other methods available to gauge the merits of an academic claiming an elevation to “professor”. The Australian, European and American systems are excellent. If those are applied, I don’t think there will be many Professors in SL – past or present. The critical, fundamental issue, of which the SL UGC does not appear to have any clue is PEER RECOGNITION.
        Science, from the days of Kepler, Gallileo, Bacon, and Newton, and more recently, Popper, thrives on this recognition. Of course, this can be abused. There are numerous scandals, well recorded in the history of Science. For example, in the Royal Society of Britain, many individuals were thwarted by those in power. It is a topic for another day. But, Sri Lanka academics and the public would benefit greatly from the understanding of the importance of the concept of ‘peer recognition. I would love to count the number of significant articles written by the members of successive SL UGC members. Surely, not all UGC members need be ‘pure academics’ but some absolutely have to be thoroughbred academics! Otherwise, they don’t know what is involved in enhancing University Education.

  • 4
    0

    W.D. Lakshman has a title as a professor but he never managed to live up to the expectations of the title. He got his professorship while working for Colombo university and later held the esteemed Vice Chancellor title as well, but his tenure was full of nepotism and corruption. I am surprised the writer did not know about the highly inappropriate procedure he manipulated to get his son in to the academic staff and get him a scholarship before completing his minimum years at the faculty. I wouldn’t go in to the huge corruption that took place with the construction of the new library. All in all, Lakshman is just a screenshot of most of our so called intellectuals today who would do any dirty laundry work to appease the politicians and equally get compensated for the cleaning job they so lovingly do for them!

    • 1
      0

      I didn’t know this; I had left the Uni before Lakshman became VC around 2002 I think. But I generally knew him reasonably well before that.

  • 1
    0

    The media has a responsibility to refer to persons with the correct title so that the general public will not be misled.

    • 0
      0

      Totally agree. The Media in Sri Lanka are largely a bunch that reflects exactly what the Country is- completely duped, aimless in intent and unsophisticated. The “new” generation of journalists probably get harassed by the Seniors to produce just stories good enough to fill some pages. Why everyone keeps referring to the corrupt politicians with honorific expressions endlessly (i.e., as “E-Thuma”, “amathi-thuma”, etc etc.) beggars belief! It shows cowardice if nothing else!

      • 0
        0

        ….Why everyone keeps referring to the corrupt politicians with honorific expressions endlessly beggars belief! …
        Last week I saw an infamous one, Dilith, gifting a school bus from stained wealth and the school children worshipping with heads at his feet.
        Sometimes I think this is gene mutation over 500+ years of colonial mentality bred into many, paying obeisance to the “rich and powerful” and not thinking of how they got there.

  • 0
    0

    Your article on Professional titles and competence is indeed an eyeopener to a larger problem that exists in Sri Lanka. Most of our leaders lack character which is basically the most important attribute of a leader. A leader of character follows a set of values, shows empathy and maintains high moral standards which is shown through their dress, speech and action. A leader earns respect by being a dignified personality. A leader should have a sound intellectual capacity which includes professional competence. Those who are professionally competent need not show their qualifications or titles because society at large will recognize and respect them accordingly. Sadly Sri Lanka today lacks exemplary statesmen/women who could take our country out of the mess we are in at present. Instead we have selfish party centric politicians who are elected to parliament and call themselves Members of Parliament every 5 years to serve themselves. All their titles and professional qualifications have only taken this country to this pathetic state we are in at present.

Leave A Comment

Comments should not exceed 200 words. Embedding external links and writing in capital letters are discouraged. Commenting is automatically disabled after 7 days and approval may take up to 24 hours. Please read our Comments Policy for further details. Your email address will not be published.