27 September, 2020

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5th Anniversary Of Sri Lanka’s Diplomatic Victory, May 26-27, 2009: Winning And Losing The Cold War

By Dayan Jayatilleka –

Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

“…And mine is the sling of David” – Jose Marti (The ‘Apostle’ of Cuban Independence)

The international press called it ‘victory’ and even ‘triumph’. Exactly five years ago, on 28th May 2009, The Times (London) headlined a report as follows: “Sri Lanka forces West to retreat over ‘war crimes’ with victory at UN”. Concluding our Thirty Years War in May 2009 we had victories on two fronts, or our victory had two dimensions: military and diplomatic. We won the hot war and the first battle of the Cold War. Then, we won more votes (29) than the world’s sole superpower the USA has been able to obtain for its adversarial resolutions on Sri Lanka three years running. That was then, this is now. Navi Pillay is about to unleash the International Inquiry Mechanism targeting Sri Lanka. How far we have fallen!

Most important at the moment of victory, especially for someone in a prominent frontline role, is lucidity; understanding the limits of that victory and the long range evolution of the struggle. Barely a few days after we won the Geneva vote, my account of that battle in the Sri Lankan press opened with the following sentence: “Was Geneva the last battle of the Thirty Years (hot) war, the first battle of the next war –a global Cold War against Sri Lanka– or was it a combination? Only future history will tell.” (‘With a Little Help From Our Friends’, The Island June 1st, 2009). History has proved the projection right. Tragically, the postwar political elite of Sri Lanka was inebriated by hubris and shot the messenger on the morning after.

In an incontrovertible indication of the high stakes in Geneva at the Special Session in May 2009 and what would have followed had we not prevailed in that battle, Sri Lanka figured prominently in a discussion that the US Ambassador-at-large for War Crimes Issues had with the Official Representative for International Penal Tribunals of a Western ally, fellow P-5 member of the UN Security Council and NATO member.  In that conversation, France’s Official Representative for International Penal Tribunals, Christian Bernier is quoted as saying that Sri Lanka was “very effective in its diplomatic approach in Geneva”. [Cable dated 16 July 2009- Wikileaks]

Writing in 2012, on ‘Lessons to Learn from Geneva’ 3 years after Sri Lanka’s diplomatic victory in Geneva, the international award-winning journalist and author Nirupama Subramanian opined in “The Hindu”: “As Sri Lanka mulls over last month’s United Nations Human Rights Council resolution, it may look back with nostalgia at its 2009 triumph at Geneva. Then, barely a week after its victory over the LTTE, … Sri Lanka managed to snatch victory from the jaws of diplomatic defeat, with a resolution that praised the government for its humane handling of civilians…” (April 28, 2012, ‘The Hindu’)

As David Lewis of the  University of Bradford, and one-time head of the International Crisis Group’s Sri Lanka programme observed in 2010:

“It was Sri Lanka which generally had the best of these diplomatic battles…Sri Lankan diplomats have been active norm entrepreneurs in their own right…They have played a leading role in UN forums such as the UN HRC…As a member of the UN HRC Sri Lanka has played an important role in asserting new, adapted norms opposing both secession and autonomy as possible elements in peace-building—trends that are convergent with views expressed by China, Russia and India…” (Lewis: 2010, ‘The failure of a liberal peace: Sri Lanka’s counterinsurgency in global perspective’, pp. 658-661)

The Americans have a phrase for it: “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”. Post-war, the Sri Lankan power-wielders did exactly the opposite. They tried to fix it  and broke it. Someday, when Mahinda Rajapaksa as President or former President looks back on where things started to go wrong, he may realize that it was the dismantling of the successful defensive perimeter and the support base that Sri Lanka had built up in Geneva, and the complete change of tack. That commenced with ‘regime change’ in the Sri Lankan camp in Geneva (the Permanent Mission) within two months of the diplomatic victory, and preceded the next and far more overt mistake by half a year—the jailing of Gen. Sarath Fonseka in February 2010.

Having extended at his own discretion the continuity of Sri Lanka’s representation and thus its strategy in Geneva, President Rajapaksa was finally persuaded by his team at the NAM summit at Sharm el Shaikh in mid-July 2009 to order or endorse the drastic change of profile. I was given a month’s notice. The triggering issue was my support of (a) the 13th amendment and its full and speedy implementation and (b) a solid axis with India as the basis of our post-war foreign policy. I was the most prominent proponent of this view within the State.

The downstream result (or boomerang effect) of the July 2009 ouster has been the sustained hostile breakthrough in Geneva. The President, the security establishment —including the personality responsible for the July 2009 ‘coup’ in Sri Lanka’s Geneva Mission—and the armed forces, now have the sword of Damocles of a war crimes inquiry dangling over their heads.

It is not only the Government that has failed to understand the lessons of Geneva. It is the cosmopolitan civil society intelligentsia, which is largely anti-government. Contributing earlier this month to a valuable online anthology on Five Years after the War, a former senior official of the UN, member of the Friday Forum, declared her stance in the very title of her essay: ‘Head in my hands’.  Reading the remarks on Sri Lankan diplomacy I thought that the head in question needed examination because of at least two factors. In the first place this civil society heavyweight had approvingly identified an “era” of Sri Lankan diplomacy and listed a number of personalities which conspicuously failed to include in the pantheon, Hamilton Shirley Amerasinghe, Neville Kanakaratne and most shockingly of all, Lakshman Kadirmagar (unarguably the finest foreign minister Sri Lanka ever had). These absences are hardly accidental because all three were pronouncedly Third Worldist defenders of independence, sovereignty and non-intervention, and articulate, Westernized critics of Western hypocrisy. They (and in the development realm, Dr Gamani Corea) were the authentic exemplars of the real Great Tradition of Sri Lankan diplomacy and foreign relations.

These civil society personages supported the Ceasefire Agreement (CFA) and/or the Post-Tsunami mechanism (PTOMS), both of which were criticized by Lakshman Kadirgamar. They stood for a “diplomatic endgame to the war” rather than a military victory. They advocate a (slightly Sinophobic) West-centric diplomacy of dependence. In sharp contradistinction to their vapid, anodyne, clichétic view of diplomacy, Raymond Aron, the iconic thinker on international relations, strategy and diplomacy; contemporary student of philosophy and friend turned ideological foe of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir; mentor of the famous IR/foreign policy scholar Stanley Hoffman, had this to say about the very nature of the ‘game’ of diplomacy: “Diplomacy is a game in which the players sometimes risk losing their lives, sometimes prefer victory to the advantages that would result.” (‘Peace and War’, New York, Praeger 1968, p.5)

Our stand in Geneva five years ago was not merely about winning for the sake of the prestige and status of the country. Professor David Keen of the LSE, writing critically of Sri Lanka, in Conflict, Security and Development confirms that “The Sri Lankan government very astutely created the  political space—both nationally and internationally—in which a ‘ruthless’ solution to the civil war became possible.” He proceeds to quote my speeches and writings in the last months and weeks of the war, as illustration.

Geneva 2009 was a classic case of pre-emptive self-defense in support of the vital interests of the state and its sovereign decision to wage war to a finish. It obtained the very space and time for the military victory and the defense of that victory against the attempt to punish Sri Lanka by means of a war crimes inquiry. It was also a successful battle of ideas against neoliberal humanitarian interventionism. This is not changed by the fact that the Sri Lankan government squandered the time won in that battle.

Today, five years later, the Sri Lankan State is losing the Cold War because the Sinhala political elite is unable to — or, more accurately, is no longer able to—compete with the Tamil political elite, still less with the Western diplomatic apparatuses. It is no longer able to do so because its ability to compete and prevail depended precisely on the incorporation and deployment of the well-educated cosmopolitan (multiethnic, multi-religious) element within the political elite; the element that was the most competitive globally. The profile that any state (from Cuba to Iran, Pakistan to Zimbabwe) presents in its nodes of intersection with the outside world is one of a sophisticated elite. However as the Sri Lankan political elite and its diplomatic representation became culturally more in-bred and less meritocratic, multiethnic and modernist, its ability to compete in the world arena declined.

The Sri Lankan missions overseas are increasingly enmeshed in a matrix of the clergy of Buddhist temples in the country of accreditation, militant blue-collar Sinhala émigré organizations, military intelligence officers embedded in the embassies who interface with the first two categories and operate a separate chain of command— a shadow Embassy— with a patronage pipeline hooked up to the power centers in Colombo. The main function of the Sri Lankan embassies is neither to build bridges with and bases among the political elites and civil society in the country of accreditation, nor reach out to the educated Sinhala and Tamil elites, especially of the ‘next gen’ (the young) in those societies, but to service the Sinhala Buddhist expatriate constituencies of the regime.

For the first time in Sri Lanka’s history as an independent state, the selection of human resources, of higher cadre, proceeds through as many as four filters while matters of policy are viewed through four lenses and are therefore obscured or distorted. Today, one has to be (i) loyal to the ruling clan (not just the elected President) (ii) Sinhala Buddhist (or if one is Christian, one has to be religio-culturally conformist to the Sinhala Buddhist ideology and symbolism to the point of subservience) (iii) endorsed by the Super Securocrat and (iv) enthusiastically acquiesce in the adoption of the Pakistani model of civil-military relations, including the extensive role of the military and military intelligence; applaud the value of expanding military cooperation with Pakistan in new sectors; support the Israeli model of (non) negotiation and convert to the absurd doctrine that Tel Aviv is more important an ally and factor than neighboring New Delhi!

This postwar regime matrix chokes off high performance, sheer merit, talent or proven ability. It prevents the selection of Sri Lanka’s best and brightest, capable of competing with an educated and sophisticated Tamil political elite here and in the Diaspora. Russian Minister of Defence Sergey Shoygu correctly observed that “in today’s world, the military potential of a country is measured not only by the number of tanks and planes it has, but by its intellectual resources.” (PiR Centre Press, April 28th 2014, Moscow). Almost uniquely in the world system, the contemporary Sri Lankan state has no intellectual elite; no ‘intellectual resources’.

This is why it is a safe bet that no one has pointed out to President Rajapaksa that he and Prime Minister Modi may have a congruency of values but not a convergence of core strategic interests— and that latter rather than the former determine foreign policy. Almost certainly, no one has placed on President Rajapaksa’s desk for close reading, three indispensable texts: (A) the Indo-Lanka Accord (B)  the Accord’s geo-strategically parametric Annexures and (C) the authoritative exegesis regarding the fundamentals of India’s Sri Lanka policy contained in JN Dixit’s address to the United Services Institute.

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Latest comments

  • 19
    3

    Many would not want to read this even – since it is just ha hoo focusing only ” how good I am – MAMA THAMAI MINIHA “. Actually the matimpola MR SHOULD give you a big lunch wasting our funds – why does not he seem to be doing anything towards that ? I have no doubt, if you DJ instead happened to be a real maxist – people including me would have respected you that much. You made a big blunder to our eye. No doubt about that. Promoting crminals on international stages are also a high crime. There I would put you not second to alleged war criminals -RAJAPKAHES.

    • 4
      0

      Furthermore –

      1.In this geopolitical world anything is possible – PR companies have been doing what Ambassadors should or should not be doing.

      2. Successive SriLankan governmets have been expertly controlling damage at the UN and the Commonwealth for six decades. You simply continued it.

    • 5
      1

      I agree with you. The list of war criminals should have included this bureaucratic, opportunistic Sinhalese racist criminal.

    • 7
      0

      Actually, if so called diplomatic victory at UNHRC should be held that important, not DJ but any other good kind of authors – may be freshly-baked award winner -MS or any other journalists enjoying MR laptops should come forward with an article of praises towards the DJ´s role in 2009.
      My question is why the former Diplomat himself decided to write about his own story ?

    • 0
      0

      The Occupation Army is re-gaining more than enough for the next elections:

      http://army.lk/detailed.php?NewsId=7895

  • 17
    2

    DJ,

    you could do a better service to the nation, if you were neutral minded.

    As many became clear by several dozens of articles of yours and other authors on this valuable platform, you are not a man who is evidently to have consistent policies. At least now you should ask yourself, what have you been doing to this nation to this day ? And what better could you have done if you were a real partriot. Real patriot is not one covering all the crimes of a family rule. Why cant you leave all these harboured depitakattu principles and join good kind of politics. Even drug addicts can be brought before the people through therpies, but I dont see your person could ever be healed… Wake up DJ, you are not too late.

    • 2
      0

      Asking him to wake up for this matter – if DJ would beahve other way around – then pigs might fly. This man has discussed his own views with many among us. Now any of us can make our picture about the BEING.
      My father would call DJ like personalities [Edited out]

  • 11
    11

    ..

    Are you telling us that PM Rudrakumaran, Rev Emmanuel,Suren Surendran , Nediyawan, Sambandan, Premachandran and Sivajilingam educated, sophisticated Tamil political Elite?…

    • 7
      0

      K.A Sumanasekera

      “Are you telling us that PM Rudrakumaran, Rev Emmanuel,Suren Surendran , Nediyawan, Sambandan, Premachandran and Sivajilingam educated, sophisticated Tamil political Elite?…”

      What do those people do for living?

      Are they educated?

      Are they sophisticated?

      What do you think?

      Could I have an honest answer.

      Please let me know about those people who are closed to the clan,

      Duminda, Mervyn, Gota, Basil, Malaka, Weerawansa,………. Douglas, Pillayan, Premadasa, ……. Cyril Mathew, Gamini Disanayake, ………

      • 0
        4

        Dear Native,

        Shouldn’t you direct your question to Dayan if you haven’t read it?.

        BTW,

        Can you put in a word to your TNGTE mates and get Dayan a gig there.

        French and Norwegian chapters and even the PM perhaps can do better with his thoroughbred English education , sophistication and the elite background.

        Poor fella seems so depressed nowadays , without his Diplomatic perks to enjoy croissants and coffee in Cafes in Paris.

        • 4
          1

          K.A Sumanasekera the Sinhala speaking Vellala,

          “Can you put in a word to your TNGTE mates and get Dayan a gig there.”

          No I can’t. You are the one who is most fascinated by Vellalas and has been longing for their affection.

          ” Poor fella seems so depressed nowadays , without his Diplomatic perks to enjoy croissants and coffee in Cafes in Paris.”

          He at least benefited from MR clan for his services to them as war crime denier in chief. Without any tangible benefit from the clan why the hell are you bent on batting Hambantota Mafia?

          Did they use you as a condom?

          • 0
            3

            Dear Native,

            …I always pad up for the Country and bat for the great majority who want to live in peace and harmony…..

  • 15
    5

    Any masochist who has read Dayan’s latest typing could you let us know whether it is worth reading.

    Please be honest.

    • 8
      0

      please tell me too NV , I only read the first line where he was praising himself again (surprise surprise ) and stopped !

      • 4
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        Dev

        “I only read the first line where he was praising himself again (surprise surprise ) and stopped !”

        I may be a jungle dwelling Veddah, however I too have my own principles you know.

        I have stopped reading articles by intellectually dishonest authors/writers/historians/………

        You too will feel good/better if you follow my simple principle. It won’t cost you anything.

    • 6
      2

      .
      Read the title and start reading the comments…
      Success of CT is having smart readers.
      :-)

    • 4
      0

      You are deadright.
      I did not even read the first line completely – kwnoing the guy is going to hold his own eulogy by himself.

  • 18
    7

    Dayan Jayatilleka, the great,

    5th Anniversary Of Sri Lanka’s Diplomatic Victory: No, it is the anniversary of the diplomatic coverup and fooling the international community of the genocide of Tamils committed in 2009 during the war.

  • 9
    2

    The greatest Sinhala intellectual is writing this?

    Sengodan. M

    • 10
      1

      Let me modify this in this way. So that the CT readership would get the message across.

      ” The greatest self proclaimed political analyst,so called patriot, a former Embassador to France, a former front men of lost diplomatic outfit of MR regime, condomized to serve for COVER MISSION of MR regime”.

      Now sadly an unemployed but still coughing for future appointments intending to help winning either MR or Sajith P the ONLY dimiwit son of an another polpot like leader of the nation, not far differnt to the nature of Mahinda Rajapakshe

  • 2
    4

    Navi Pillay international Tamil [Edited out],

    I think we must thankful to USA and UK as they drag fuccking international inquiry year by year.. TNA + Pro-LTTE tamils are suffering from brain trauma as they were fooled by USA & UK ..

    There weren’t war crimes TNA + Pro-LTTE tamils.. you go back to [Edited out],,

    hahaa Sinhalese Army defeated eelarm dream .. it wont come back again..

    Peace loving tamils live in Sri Laka without any issue.. Only pro-LTTE suffers

    • 5
      0

      Bebon must be a real Baboon; he cannot even spell a four letter word correctly!

  • 4
    5

    Dear Dr. Dayan,

    Today, five years later, the Sri Lankan State is losing the Cold War because the Sinhala political elite is unable to — or, more accurately, is no longer able to—compete with the Tamil political elite, still less with the Western diplomatic apparatuses.

    The Tamil political elite activism began on the same eve Donoughmore commission concluded. With the advent of democracy they are shaken with the realisation Tamil low-castes and majority Sinhala can easily take over thanks to the universal adult franchise.

    One can hardly call what follows “Tamil intellectual prowess”. The Tamil political elite begin bombarding Britsh colonial office with tales of Sinhala discrimination. The British Parliment send Lord Soulbury to see what is causing the Tamil cacophony.

    Please read chapter 7 – Discrimination, Soulbury report for a summary of his findings. The Tamil elite list a large number of grievances allegedly caused due to discrimination of Tamils. Lord Soulbury dismisses all of them after careful study.

    The so called “Tamil advocacy” you allude to is simply bullshitting and exaggeration of everything. Nowadays they flood emails everyone with lies. Everyone knows Tamils are lying.

    If this is anything close to an “intellectual pursuit”, Tamils will be ruling Ceylon by now backed by 65 million Tamils in their Nadu,

    What I suggest you do is stop selling youself and the non-Tamils in Ceylon short.

    • 5
      0

      Imbecile,

      In retrospect Lord Soulbury regretted that he should forced a federal constitution! The promise made by DS Senanayake that the minorities would come to no harm fell flat starting with the disfranchising of the estate Tamils. The rest is history. You fool still writing rubbish incessantly on these forums thinking that other are fools! Get a life you cheap bigot!

      • 1
        2

        The promise made by DS Senanayake that the minorities would come to no harm fell flat starting with the disfranchising of the estate Tamils.

        You shoo away one Tamil slapping him hard with reality another one comes along saying the same crap!

        The new citizenship policy was anyone who lived in Ceylon for more than 5 years was given citizenship. How many years did you wait until your refugee claim was approved? Estate tamils did not have franchise to be ‘disfranchised’ in the first place. Most Tamils who did not meet the criteria ended up staying with over million Tamils given citizenship.

        • 2
          0

          Vibushana (independent thinking person)

          You write CRAP.

          How many years mass murderer Gota Rajapkse lived in America? Is he permanent resident or green card holder of USA.

          These TAMILS you talk about worked hard and the country dependant on them to produce TEA &RUBBER. Their contribution to the Ceylon economy must be appreciated not made stateless.

          • 1
            3

            listen, I am going say this slowly as I am writing to a dimwit.

            Tamils after 5 years were given citizenship.

            There are Tamils in Tamil Nadu not given citizenship even after 30 years. Kapeesh?

            • 3
              0

              Vibhushana

              Hundreds of thousands of Tamils after hundreds of years of contribution to this island under most strenuous circumstances made stateless at the stroke of midnight by 1948 citizenship act.

              ” Tamils after 5 years were given citizenship.”

              When did this policy come into effect? And could you cite the act which granted citizenship to Tamils after five years.

              By the time Hindia kicked JR to change citizenship act nearly half of the hard working upcountry Tamils had already been deported to Tamilnadu.

              You have already gone ga ga. Now you are driving all of us mad.

    • 4
      0

      Dear Lowcaste Vibushana,

      “””I feel sorry for you and your community and I wish I could provide some acceptable solution”””” Lord Soulbury

      “Dear Mr. Suntharalingham,

      I have read the dozen documents in the folder which I now return to you – with much interest and also much sorrow.

      During my tenure of the office as Governor-General of Ceylon I never expected that there would be such a bitter cleavage between the Sinhalese and Tamil communities – and you are quite right when you say that the cause must be laid at the door of Sir John Kotalawala and his government. But if he chastised the Tamils with the whips, the late Mr. Bandaranaike chastised them with scorpions. The Sinhalese behaviour to the Tamils has been excessively short-sighted and foolish. When as Chairman of the Commission on the reform of the Constitution of Ceylon in 1945 I studied the relations of the two communities. I was much impressed by the important contribution that the Tamils had made and were making to the economy of Ceylon – and I was aware that the Ceylon Tamils were better educated and more industrious than the Sinhalese – in many ways they were playing the part of the Scots had played and still play in the economy of England. In fact during 18th and part of 19th century – the English were rather jealous of the Scots – who were getting a greater share of the jobs going in England than their population warranted. The reason, I Think, was that the Scots were better educated and more industrious – Northern folk often work harder than Southerners; the climate and soil compel them to do so. But the English were never so stupid as to antagonise the Scots. Had they behaved like Sinhalese to the Tamils, Britain would never have achieved a tittle of her prosperity at home or overseas in the Empire.

      If at this time of the act of Union between England and Scotland at the beginning of the 18th century the English had insisted on “English only” as the language of the two nations, every Scot would have hung on to Gaelic, but the English had more sense and every Scottish Mother had her children taught English because it was England that offered the greatest opportunity of employment.

      If the Sinhalese had been as sensible, every Tamil Mother would have been anxious for her children to learn Sinhalese-for the same reason. I do not know what is now the best solution, or if there is any solution.

      In constitution which I recommended-there seemed to me at the time to be ample safeguard for minorities – but section 29 has not as efficacious as I had hoped – and I now wish that that I had recommended a human rights clause as in the constitution of India – and elsewhere. But I do not believe that other federation or an autonomous Tamil State will work. Federation is cumbersome and difficult to operate – and an autonomous Tamil State would not be viable.

      I am afraid that I can only counsel patience – and vigorous participation in the work of the House of Representatives. You might imitate the Irish party in our House of Commons before Ireland was separated from us. Incidently the Tamil Members of Parliament were, in my opinion, very unwise not support Dudley Senanayake. They could, I believe, have kept him in power.

      The position of the Tamil workers on the estates is also very disquieting – it is deplorable that such a larger body of men and women should be voteless.

      I can understand the reluctance of the Sinhalese in the area of Kandy to an enfranchisement of numbers large enough to swamp the electorate. But a reasonable solution would be to create four or five seats available to Tamil voters only – no matter what part of the island they live in; outside of course – northern and Eastern provinces.

      Well – I feel sorry for you and your community and I wish I could provide some acceptable solution.

      Were I in your shoes I would do all I could to support the U.N.P. and secure the defeat of the present Government.

      Soulbury

      30.04.1964″
      https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/sinhala-stupidity-i-feel-sorry-for-the-tamil-community/

      • 4
        0

        Anpu

        “Dear Lowcaste Vibushana,”

        This is unacceptable.

        • 3
          0

          Sorry NV & others. I did not meant to heart any one. Vibushana keeps on “Tamil low-castes” ….

          Caste is not the major PROBLEM now. I am not saying it is completely gone. But it is disappearing fast.

          • 4
            0

            Anpu

            Fine

          • 2
            0

            “….heart…” – Spelling wrong. should read – hurt any one.

      • 1
        1

        Anpu,

        So its Suntharalingham complaining to Solubury about ‘desrmination’ eh?

        Suntharalingham did not allow low-caste Tamils set foot inside schools and temples. He personally hounded them off hitting them with a cane apparently. This was in 1967. The Tamil caste dicrimnation was far worse than apartheid. He was an architect of the ‘Tamil homeland’ designed to keep the low castes in something like a chicken coop.

        Didn’t I tell you to grow brain with independent thought? what happened?

    • 1
      0

      Cold war ? what cold war? where?

  • 3
    0

    One is of course compelled to read the self-laudatory ramblings of the Greatest Living Sinhalese Scribe. You never know what you may find. The man makes some valid points, particularly on the state of the present-day shitty heap that passes as our diplomatic service. Our embassies are becoming more like retirement homes for surplus military bods! Truth to tell, our international relations took a distinct dive the day our heroic Gothcha let fly some choice native invective at the hapless Kouchner-Milliband duo. Our Dr D J sounds like a man in need of a mission, but is anyone listening? Meanwhile, the smart boys and girls of the Yal Diaspora continue to run circles round the yakkos that guide our ‘external affairs’. Whatever will Dr D J’s heroes of yester-year say?

  • 2
    2

    Lest we forget!

  • 3
    0

    I am sure Dayan you regret your inability to put some bed time story books for his excellency to read. But you have already given him good advise via your interview in “The Hindu”, where you state quite idotically ” It all depends as to how our President will be able to cultivate a friendship with Prime Minister Modi and move ahead.”

    Yes, Modi will be cultivating a friendship at huge expense to his popularity in South India ? He will trade that for some kiri bath and a bit of Muslim bashing ?

    DJ, our president is far sharper that you. He has praised Modi’s leadership qualities. I am sure in diplomatic terms you know what that means.

    • 3
      0

      well, he may be regretting to have defended the regime considering that he was not named to the last delegation to the UNHRC. All his articles upto the time were well articulated to regain MR´s lapdog status, though failed sofar for some unknow reasons.

  • 2
    0

    This man has again started to blow his own trumpet.For how long will he do it? The victory was not due to him but the resolution was brought too early when all the evidence has not emerged. Will he not stop this topic and think about and write about making democracy work in Sri Lanka so that people could at least breathe freely. Why not the Professor take classes to nincompoops like Aswer,Merwin et al or join them instead of posing as a great hero.

  • 1
    0

    ” Sinhala political elite is unable to — or, more accurately, is no longer able to—compete with the Tamil political elite “

    No they are competing with dumbness itself – with your help.

    They ain’t as smart as you are to help pass “… a resolution that praised the government for its humane handling of civilians…”

  • 7
    1

    Dayan, at the UN in 2009 you said:

    There will be Normalcy, Stability Healing and Reconciliation in Sri Lanka.

    Did you lie when you stated these words? Where is the Normalcy, Stability, Healing and Reconciliation?

    You also subsequently stated:

    “Sri Lanka’s administration could proceed on the basis of what is called ‘5Rs’, or reform, re-set, re-balance and roll-back……..
    Reform means precisely the implementation of the LLRC report within a compressed time frame.’Reform also includes the full and expeditious implementation of the 13th amendment to the constitution.’The re-set button with India necessarily involves the full implementation of the 13th amendment(Jayatillaka said)”.

    Did any of the above ever take place, you may say 13th amendment is there but the PCs do not have the full power given under the amendment and the constitution is being violated.

    I begin to wonder in your current article if you are truly celebrating or blowing your own trumpet of the victory of 2009 or you are throwing mud at the Government of Sri Lanka and celebrating the non-implementation of the promises you as a representative gave to the UN, which I am sure is the Government’s position at that point of time.

    So in short you or the Government of Sri Lanka did not have a victory in 2009, you lied to the global body and got away with it and now those lies have come to haunt both you and the Government.

  • 4
    1

    Dayan beats his “2009 UNHRC success” drum occasionally.
    It is OK – he is entitled to it.
    But,he is the man who invented an “external threat” to sri lanka via the north,to justify the militarisation of the northern province, and this was later extended to the east,and is now slowly engulfing the whole country.
    As he says,his advocacy of the 13th amendment caused his ouster.
    But,how did he expect the full implementation of the 13th amendment to
    to function under a military regime?

  • 0
    2

    The diaspora factor is new to SL Politics – it is most powerful as a
    Diaspora in todays affairs internationally and must be recognized so. It will work for its community first. It was created willy-nilly by local politics and more emboldened by unwise moves of this Regime. TGTE is an
    example of the direction it will take. The latest use of a UN resolution not intended against a separatist-war is the extra-walk undertaken by US Gota towards Reconciliation!

    • 3
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      More importantly the question should be asked why is the diaspora working so hard? The answer is simple, after the war every one including Tamils, Sinhalese and Muslims (Although Islam is a religion and Muslims are Tamils as they speak Tamil)expected the Government of Sri Lanka and President Rajapakse to take the opportunity and give equal rights to every Sri Lankan. But at the end it did not happen. In fact what has happened in Sri Lanka is a “silent military coup”. YOu see army in diplomatic services, army commenting on police matters, army in civil functions, army in business etc. Unless we are a province of China (as this is the Chinese philosophy)this should not happen in Sri Lanka. Its no more Sri – Lanka its just Lanka.

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    I wish the diplomatic battles weren’t set-up as elite Tamil vs. elite Sinhala. What the country needed in 2009 and even does now is a battle against forces which seek to terrorize civilians.

    These terrorizers, if you will, come in many shades, not just in Tiger skins. I wish all living in Sri Lanka can put aside past hurt, trauma and anger to unite to oppose these terrorizers, be they the LTTE or those supported by elected politicians or state institutions.

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      Words ‘terrorist’, ‘traitor’ and ‘patriot’ are most misunderstood and misinterpreted words in Siri Lanka.
      There is no worse lie than misunderstood truth’

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    What projection is he talking about? This statement represents a series of questions and what does he mean by “future history”??? Has he gone bonkers?

    Also, Dayan, you may have played a few slick cards in Geneva in 2009, but effectively you were doing this on the backs of thousands of brutally slaughtered civilians…. … the world has learnt the truth now, so there is little escape from due process via UNHRC.

    Dayan, you probably are quite a smart chappie, but you come across as being intellectually dishonest and self-seeking to the core…. as one or two other correspondents have stated, you should do yourself and the country a worthwhile service and work hard to rally the intelligentsia and the common voter alike and awaken them to the tragedy that lies waiting for Sri Lanka unless they unite across ethnic, religious and political divides and unceremoniously boot these malicious rascals out of power, leaving the next regime to start to redress all the terrible wrongs of the past 9 years.

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    DJ has not passed the year 2009 yet. Ignorance, laziness, vengeance,soi disant expertise and with more of loneliness and frustration may cause not being able to leave 2009 to go. The leaders of the Tamils who lost 147,000, TNA leader Sampanthar, TGTE’s PM Rudrakumaran et al are mourning and taking about 2009 only once a year these days. King is celebrating only once a year unless there is an election in between. DJ is celebrating his victory every week for five years .

    The Army generals in the war massacred 147,000 and claimed zero casualty. Lanka’s ambassadors to UN the spread lies and claimed that was diplomacy. Now,the entire world is refusing to accept that. Every thing DJ and other said in the UNHRC on those may 23-26 days were lies. This behavior, exactly matched the behavior of an election candidate in Sri Lanka would behave in the election to get votes. Those who bought DJ’s lies first time believed Lanka and vote for it. But right on the next voting, the Table was turned around. It did not continue like Mahavamsa Modays’ election(i.e. election after election one can tell lies, but the Mahavamsa Modaya’s will vote.)

    DJ did not tell on those meeting that as much as 150,000 could have been killed. He did not tell they the Sinhalese government never has a history of keeping the words or honoring the pacts signed. A thief can not claim his money as his income. A liar in a debate can never claim a victory. What DJ has got to celebrate. Isn’t everything DJ said was found out lies by the countries who voted for Lanka and now voting against the Lanka. America did not get 29 because it is not the countries still thinking that anything DJ said was true. Those opposite side votes are coming from Anti-american countries like China, Russia, Pakistan, Cuba, Vietnam, Middle-east et al.

    After sacked with in a month of the 2009 Special UNHRC sitting, DJ still waiting for his recognition from Royal Government for his dedicated service. Here he looks like the poor parrot that lived on the Kapok tree. It never had a chance to eat the Kapok fruit.

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      yes. Back to the Future DJ Part 1

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    ”Today, five years later, the Sri Lankan State is losing the Cold War because the Sinhala political elite is unable to — or, more accurately, is no longer able to—compete with the Tamil political elite, still less with the Western diplomatic apparatuses” ?

    Remedy already given:

    ”Mr Weeratunga’s presentation does not contain any of the following points which could rally the requisite support to deflect the threat of an international accountability mechanism:

    A credible local investigation by distinguished Sri Lankan personalities of high international repute.
    A compressed time frame for the full implementation of the 13th amendment.
    The speedy arrest and prosecution of those identifiable through video evidence of attacking places of religious worship.
    A strong anti-discrimination legislation and a powerful watchdog body with teeth.
    A UNESCO supervised revision of school text books by a panel of internationally renowned Sri Lankan scholars (such as Prof Sudharshan Seneviratne) so as to minimize prejudice against communities and ‘build the defences of peace in the minds of men’.
    The reconstitution of the Ministry of Human Rights and the Peace Secretariat (SCOPP) as well as the appointment of a highly respected National Ombudsman for Human Rights who would report to parliament and a more autonomous and credible National Commission of Human Rights.
    The restoration of the independent commissions proposed by the 17th amendment, albeit with no prejudice to the 18th amendment and the removal of presidential term limits.
    The bridging legislation needed domestically to fully incorporate the ICCPR” – The Lalith Weeratunga Presentation, 28 January 2014,
    https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/the-lalith-weeratunga-presentation/

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    .
    If DJ did a good job, why was he fired by MaRa and later called him a NGO guy?

    I think DJ promised too much without MaRa’s approval to get resolution passed in favour of Srilanka.

    DJ get fired, GL get raise.

    :-)

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      aratai

      “DJ get fired, GL get raise.”

      G L did have durian, DJ didn’t.

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      DJ is good enough to give lectures for students in junior terms at the university.
      But I really dont think a persson who blurts out – not thinking twice could do the job of a real diplomat. This country has a greater history of better diplomacies. Jayantha Danaphala, Late MR Kadi and several others could help teaching DJ if he will agan want to try the area. Consistency is not what you would not find in DJ`s genetics.

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    5th anniversary of murdering of thousands of TAMILS in 2009 and the suffering of Tamils continues (because of the diplomatic cover up by this liar Dayan Jayatilleka.)- according to South African human rights lawyer and activist Yasmin Sooka https://barhumanrights.org.uk/sites/default/files/documents/news/an_unfinihsed_war._torture_and_sexual_violence_in_sri_lanka_2009-2014_0.pdf

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      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdtf-R_qo7Q&feature=youtu.be
      Senator Jaffer meets with South African human rights lawyer and activist Yasmin Sooka to discuss the new report: “An Unfinished War: Torture and Sexual Violence in Sri Lanka 2009-2014” – By Yasmin Sooka, The Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales (BHRC) and The International Truth & Justice Project, Sri Lanka.

      The report paints a chilling picture of the continuation of the war in Sri Lanka against ethnic Tamils, five years after the guns went silent.

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    This is hilarious … poor Dayan. “Some day when the President has retired he may realise it started to go wrong after Geneva 2009” … so after he fired Dayan – so melancholy … its like he will be sorry one day that he fired me. Its hard to believe DJ, but the world doesn’t revolve around you.

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    Dear Dr. Dayan:

    Speaking as one PhD to another, the question I’ve long had is this:

    Did you really expect that the brutal counter-insurgency machine created by Gotabaya and Fonseka (building on the work of many predecessors), which destroyed the independent media, badly damaged independent civil society, undermined the judiciary and politicised the police — and succeeded in doing so by rallying the Sinhala masses around a simplistic and unquestioning militarist nationalism — did you really imagine this death-machine could easily be turned off once the LTTE (and many thousands of non-combatant Tamils) were destroyed? Was this in any way realistic? What would be the “objective political and social forces” capable of challenging and redirecting a state and a military that had been so empowered and allowed to commit such crimes with such impunity for so long? Was such a machine ever likely to turn around and begin to respect rights, accept limits on its power, much less share state power with Tamils? What were you smoking to believe this was possible?

    Having worked for and ideologically equipped a regime built on such brutality and lust for power, you are now in no position to be surprised, much less critical, that it has begun to devour the very people that gave it such unquestioning support from 2006-10. And you are in no position to expect any sympathy from those courageous Sri Lankans who questioned and challenged the regime much earlier and more forcefully than you.

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