15 November, 2018

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“Dear Mr President, Do Not Re-Implement Death Penalty” — Human Rights Commission

Dr Deepika Udagama, Chairperson of the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka (HRCSL) has urged President Maithripala Sirisena to ‘do away with the decision to re-implement capital punishment.’

Dr. Deepika Udagama

Udagama, in this letter, while referring to an early missive to the President (date January 1, 2016) where the Commission called for the abolition of capital punishment, has nevertheless backed off from that position, calling only for ‘non-implementation’. The Commission instead recommends ‘a series of strong and long term policies including strengthening of institutions and procedures aimed at addressing serious crimes including drug trafficking.

The full text of the letter is given below.

His Excellency Maithripala Sirisena

President of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka

Presidential Secretariat
Colombo 1

Your Excellency,

Re : Proposalto Re-!mplement Capital Punishment

We have been made to understand during the past few days through media reports that Cabinet approval has been granted to re-implement capital punishment against those drug traffickers who have been convicted and are under death sentence and that the government agrees to implement capital punishment with immediate effect on those convicts who continue to engage in drug trafficking while being in prison. The Human Rights commission expresses its deep concern regarding this development.

The Commission by its letter dated 01 Jan 2016 conveyed to Your Excellency its detailed recommendation that Sri Lanka should abolish capital punishment (annexed). We had stated therein that capital punishment is a thoroughly cruel and inhuman punishment; it amounts to severe infringement of the right to life, right to be free of cruel and inhuman punishment and a host of other human rights; and that capital punishment should be abolished since it is an ineffective, extreme and irreversible form of punishment that does not help reduce crime.

We agree that drug trafficking gives rise to severe social problems, especially that addiction to drugs on the part of the younger generation poses a grave threat to the future generations of the country, and that, therefore, drug traffickers can be recognized as persons engaged in an egregious anti-social activity. Yet, it is our opinion that this process can be curtailed not by re-implementing ineffective forms of punishment such as capital punishment, but by bringing drug dealers before the law in an efficient manner and imposing other forms of serious punishments depending on the nature of the crimes they have committed.

lf those already convicted and imprisoned for drug trafficking still continue to engage in drug trafficking while being in prison through contact with the outside world via the use of modern technology, the appropriate solution is to strengthen the security arrangements in the prisons using modern technological methods. Also, it is necessary to exercise constant vigilance over officials who may be involved in these activities and bring them before the law. Further, it is a well known fact that drug trafficking has reached such high proportions mainly due to assistance received by major drug dealers through political connections and also from certain elements within the law enforcement establishment. We are convinced that the drug menace cannot be successfully eradicated in the long run through instant and ineffective solutions such as the re- imposition of capital punishment without addressing the root causes.

Further, we observe a new trend in society whereby certain sections of society are now questioning the strong public support of capital punishment hitherto prevalent in Sri Lanka. We observe that this is due to the fact that confidence placed in administration of justice in Sri Lanka is eroding.

In the recommendation we made in 20L6, we pointed out that the abolition of capital punishment is a contemporary trend among a majority of countries in the world. Despite capital punishment being a part of our statue book, non-implementation of death sentences since 1976 had earned international commendation for Sri Lanka. Furthermore, Sri Lanka voted in support of a resolution calling for a moratorium on executions adopted by the UN General Assembly in 20L6. It is inevitable that the international recognition Sri Lanka earned by embarking on the path of democracy would see a backward slide if policies such as re- implementation of the death penalty are adopted.

Therefore, the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka earnestly and respectfully urges Your Excellency to do away with the decision to re-implement capital punishment and instead implement a series of strong and long term policies (including strengthening of institutions and procedures) aimed at addressing serious crimes including drug trafficking.

Dr. N. D. Udaganta

Chairperson

Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka


His Excellency Maithripala Sirisena

President of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka

Presidential Secretariat

Colombo 1

Your Excellency,

RECOMMENDATION TO ABOLISH THE DEATH PENALW IN SRI LANKA

We extend to Your Excellency our warm wishes for the New Year.

We take this opportunity, on this auspicious day, to recommend the abolition of the deathpenalty in Sri Lanka in keeping with Sri Lanka’s commitment to a more humane society consonant with human rights principles and values.

ln terms of the Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka Act No. 2L of 1996, the Human RightsCommission of Sri Lanka is required by Section 10 (c) and 10(d) of the said Act, among otherthings, to advise and assist the government in formulating legislation and administrative directives and procedures in furtherance of the promotion and protection of fundamentalrights and to make recommendations to the Government regarding measures which should betaken to ensure that national laws and administrative practices are in accordance withinternational human rights norms and standards.

The Human Rights Commission wishes to bring to Your Excellency’s and the Government’sattention its recommendations regarding the abolition of the death penalty, which theCommission views is imperative for Sri Lanka in recognition of the growing global recognitionthat the death penalty seriously violates several human rights including the right to life andfreedom from cruel and inhuman punishmen| is an extreme and irreversible punishmenU andis ineffective as a deterrent to crime. Sri Lanka should demonstrate its commitment to the sanctity of life and fundamental human rights principles by joining the more than 100 nationsin the world that have abolished the death penalty thus far. Another 60 countries do not carry out death sentences in practice.

lnternational human rights obligations of Sri Lanka clearly discourage the death penalty. Article3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights enshrines the sanctity of human life by affirmingthat everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person, whilst Article 6 of the lnternational Covenant on Civil and Political Rights strongly suggests that abolition of the deathpenalty is desirable.

Your Excellency’s attention is drawn to the Second Optional Protocol to the lnternational Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, adopted by the UN General Assembly by resolution 44/128 of 15th December 1989 which calls forthe abolition of the death penalty. lts Preamble declares that the abolition of the death penalty contributes to the enhancement of humandignity and progressive development of human rights. ln keeping with Sri Lanka’s commitmentto improving human rights protection in the country we recommend that Sri Lanka accede to the Protocol and take steps to abolish the death penalty.

Whilst appreciating that from 7976, successive governments in Sri Lanka have not implementedthe death penalty, the Commission notes that courts continue to impose the death penaltyunder several statutes which provide for the imposition of the death penalty, including thePenal Code and the Poisons, Opium and Dangerous Drugs Ordinance as amended by Act No. 13 of 1984.

ln view of international and comparative jurisprudence, the Commission agrees with theposition that the death penalty amounts to cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment andfails to respect the sanctity of human life. The Supreme Court of Sri Lanka has held thatalthough there is no express fundamental right to life , nevertheless that such a right is impliedin the 1978 Constitution of Sri Lanka. Article 11 of the 1978 Constitution prohibits without anyreservation torture as well as cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment.

The Commission seeks to place before Your Excellency and the Government the following factors which should be considered in abolishing the death penalty:

i) Death Penalty as a deterrence to crime

Many proponents of the implementation of the death penalty have urged itsimplementation as a deterrence to crime. However, it is our view that it is aneffective justice system and a just social order that lead to a reduction in crime, as isseen in countries which have some of the lowest crime rates. There is no empirical data, to show that death penalty has caused a reduction in crime or has a deterrent effect on crime.

ii) The risk of miscarriage of justice and the irreversibility of capital punishment

Despite constitutional safeguards, including the appeals process andrecommendations being called from the trial judge, the Attorney General andMinister of Justice, it is the view of the Commission that there is always the risk ofinnocent persons being executed for crimes which they did not commit.

It is the view of the Commission that in view of the serious flaws which exist in the criminal justice system coupled with Sri Lanka, unlike other countries, not having aprocess permitting the reopening of a criminal case after exhaustion of the appealsprocedures, there is a serious risk of a miscarriage of justice. Although due process in criminal proceedings are guaranteed by the Constitution and statutory law, there is always the possibility of human error distorting the final outcome.

The Commission wishes to place before Your Excellency that there have beenseveral instances, in countries including those of the developed world, where alsodue to new investigation techniques and development of technology, fresh evidencehas surfaced or doubts raised about the integrity of evidence many years after conviction. ln the United States , Canada and the United Kingdom there have beenseveral occasions where people wrongly convicted have been released from death row or prison decades later, the most recent being a U.S. man who was released inNovember in Louisiana after serving 23 years in prison for several crimes, becausethe judge found he did not obtain a fair trail. The lead investigator and the judge inthe original trial said they believe his conviction was a “miscarriage of justice”.Similarly, the Commission notes there are allegations of prosecutorial misconductleading to conviction of the innocent in Sri Lanka. Such an instance is highlighted inthe Supreme Court Judgment of Wijepolo v Attorney General (2001) 1 SLR 42.

iii) Accused not being properly defended

The Commission is also of the view that the chances are that accused from underprivileged circumstances would be more prone to be subjected to the deathpenalty than those who have the financial means to hire competent counsel. There is a possibility of certain accused being convicted not due to their guilt but due tobeing improperly defended. ln the High Court where accused are financially unable to retain counsel, the State assigns counsel from the private bar at random, who often tend to be young, untrained, inexperienced and not sufficiently remunerated.

For all of the above reasons the Human Rights Commission recommends that Sri Lankaratifies the Second Optional Protocol to the ICCPR and abolishes the death penalty forthwith.The death penalty should be substituted with periods of imprisonment that befit theieriousness of each crime. Accordingly, we recommend that commutation of periods ofimprisonment for such crimes also be done according to a national policy that takes intoconsideration the serious impact of such crime on society.

Dr. N.D. Udagama,
Chairperson,
National Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka.

Cc: Hon. Prime MinisterHon. Speaker

Hon. Leader of the OppositionHon. Minister of Justice

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Latest comments

  • 17
    6

    Also along with Drug Traffickers, Cold blooded Murderers of Lasantha, Ekeligoda, Raviraj, Thajudeen Welikada Massacre, rathupaswela, Roshen, Antony, Lalith Kugan, etc. etc.

    Monies stashed in Swiss Banks, Dubai, Ukraine, Seychelles, Texas, should also be given the death penalty first and foremost.

    Money robbed from Bond Scam, Hedging, Greek Bonds, Nilwala, Spectrum, Warship, CSN, Krish, Hellocorp, Rocket , Tsunami Helping Hambantota should also be given the death penalty.

    Owners of Media Channels owned by Kudu Boss, Stock Market Manipulator and Killi Boss should also be hanged.

    • 7
      6

      Sir,
      Sirisena has proven to be a shameless, HYPOCRITE. He is yet to hang Gota Raja, who shot 29 prison inmates in cold blood. Instead, Sirisena is colluding with Gota Raja to hang on to power. The stupid Sri Lankan electorate has bought Sirisena’s newfound tough on crime attitude. TARZAN WANNABE! SAD!
      Cheers!
      PS: Dr. Deepika Udugama for PRESIDENT!

      • 3
        0

        Ben Hurling

        Once the state/politicians decide to kill a person or group of persons, they slaughter them anyway. In Hindia it is known as encounter here it was known as counter insurgency campaign. In both countries the intention was to just bump off the undesirable.

        What all the fuss is about ?
        Just kill them and toss the bodies in the Kalyani River or Nanthikkadal.

    • 5
      0

      Don’t forget the land thieves occupying our poor people’s land.

    • 0
      0

      Sandra: How about the PM Ranil who asked President to remove Vijayakala Mendis because of her promoting of LTTE, then he pha d awalking photo OP with VIjayakala Mendis to score with Tribalist Tamils. Do LTTE – promoters should be executed o rnot Rajapakses and Ranil are relatives from Wicramsinghe side. What are you talking ?

    • 2
      1

      Sandra,
      Why you want to spare ‘Batalanda Wadakaya’ who is responsible for torturing and killing thousands of Sinhala youths and master minded the biggest Bank Robbery in Sri Lankan history?

      • 4
        0

        Potta Eye.
        Medamulana Warlord had 10 years from 2004 to 2015 to Investigate and punish for Batalanda.
        Why because it was a cooked up case.

    • 0
      0

      There is a bigger issue than reimplementation of death penalty in terms of violation of human rights.
      President’s Counsel Saliya Peiris who represented terrorist suspect Iyer Sriskandharajah in Gotabhaya assassination case is NOT SUITABLE to hold the post of Chairman of the OMP. It is against the law. It is prejudice. It is against all ethics.
      It is a violation of human rights of our Army against whom some give evidence before the OMP.
      Being a member of HRCSL, his appointment as the President’s Counsel was also questionable.
      How could a Human Rights lawyer for terrorist suspects who works for money holds the post of Chairman of the Independent Commission of Missing Persons?
      What guarantee is there he will not accept money and twist cases against our Army?
      How could a lawyer who defends terrorist suspects be independent?
      Except Mohanthi, all the other Commissioners appointed to the OMP by the President were die hard NGO activists who worked against our Army.
      We raised this issue and vehemently objected to the composition of the Office of Missing Persons but President didn’t pay any heed to our concerns.
      Saliya Peiris holding the post of Chairman of the OMP any longer is arbitrary. It arises serious conflict of interest.
      He should be expelled from the post FORTHWITH.
      Over to you Mr. President. The OHCHR’s goal is “promote and protect human rights of ALL” and that includes our Army who shed blood, toil, tears, sweat and sacrificed their lives, limbs, eyes to protect this land and its citizens from terrorists.

    • 0
      0

      Those incapable of doing their promises should pack their bag and luggage and give room for some one else to take over.

  • 3
    9

    Phillipine PResident Daniel Dutertae is a Hero. HE di dnot wait until the Hang man get ready. Instead he asked a special squad of Army to jump into houses of the drug king pins who ministerial security etc., and slaughter them. USA was barking but nothing happened. Now he is challenging the Almighty blievers. Sri lanka needs a president like tha tand not those who are looking for the development of their families.

    • 12
      4

      Whole world knows Phillipine President kills the drug peddlers and murderers without waiting for lengthy trials. Soft Jim should call the President to hang the well known killers and torturers of Lasantha, ekneligoda, Rathupaswala victims etc. without waiting for useless trials. I hope you will be the cheer leader at Welikada on that day.

  • 9
    0

    If it is the intention of the President to eradicate the drug menace by implementing the death penalty on those drug lords convicted by a Court of Law, then it would seem that this endeavor is a non-starter.
    The drug business is far too large and lucrative for it to collapse due to these pin-pricks. Even if the current leaders are removed permanently, they will soon be replaced by their second-in-commands or by their rivals. There are far too many persons at various levels of society who are benefitting financially from this business. These persons will not let this source of income dry-up. There will not be any let-up in the supply of drugs to the local market. The market forces (supply-demand) will not permit such a situation.

  • 22
    2

    Yes, more than the death sentence itself, what is scary is our judicial system. It is not the best in the world (let me put it that way). We can be certain mistakes will be made and wrong people will be hanged. So do not bring back the death penalty. And Maithri, please tell the monks this is a Buddhist country, you can’t just kill people to solve problems.

    • 20
      0

      Ajay, its not only the wrong people who will be hanged, it will be the poor people. Wealthy politically connected drug kings will survive and thrive, they already do.

  • 16
    1

    Do not worry Deepika, Appa Sira never does what he states he will do.

    The fact of the matter is that Appa Sira got only 15 more months and he’s gone forever. Oh what a relief!

    • 9
      6

      Mrs Udubaddewa,

      I also agree with Sandra’s comment above.
      This is a failed state now.
      Now time for International Judges.
      Ranil and My3 will never ever punish the wrong doers

  • 6
    3

    Lets starts with the death penalty by lethal Injection of the master crook below.
    A case against former President’s Chief of Staff Gamini Senarath and few others with regard to obtaining Rs.1250 crore from a bank was heard yesterday at the Fort Magistrate’s Court. The case had been filed under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act. The case was heard by Fort Chief Magistrate Ranga Dissanayake.
    Earlier, chairman of a leading bank in Colombo had been ordered to provide bank account details of the bank accounts related to these transactions. The bank had refused to provide the above details, and had requested the court to revoke the order. The Magistrate stated that the Magistrate is bound to issue appropriate orders according to section 124 of the penal code to assist the investigations. The Magistrate had yesterday ordered the aforementioned bank to obey the orders, and provide the necessary information to the Criminal Investigation Department.

  • 6
    0

    Food for thought if anyone can digest. Today Japan executed the last six of the 1995 Sarin gas killers on the subway injuring over 6000′

  • 1
    4

    Mr President never get carried away by these Dollar Kakkas like Udugama . People are with you for the death penalty.

  • 2
    4

    Mr. President, do NOT be swayed by these nincompoops. You HAVE to stop drugs. Watch what happens to the nation when drug sales is eradicated. HRC has drug connections, perhaps?!

  • 0
    0

    1.. bringing drug dealers before the law in an efficient manner and imposing other forms of serious punishments depending on the nature of the crimes they have committed.
    2. the appropriate solution is to strengthen the security arrangements in the prisons using modern technological methods

    1. Please explain other forms of serious punishments. ( Say Life in prison) then the
    the below mentioned can take place.
    2. Drug trafficker can discover or break through and overpower the modern technological methods by using the funds on drugs

  • 3
    0

    In news: Two “Entrepreneurs” in China found guilty of “BRIBERY” and amassed millions of wealth were EXECUTED on Tuesday after their conviction was appealed and rejected. Meanwhile, in Sri Lanka the “Head” of the Chinese Co. under “Investigations” for offering “Bribes” (amounting to millions) in the construction of Norochchole Power Plant, has ‘scooted” off the country. What were our FCID; CID; BRIBERY; IMMIGRATION authorities doing? Any response from the Chinese Embassy? All are SILENT; because it is a “Human Right” in Sri Lanka to “ESCAPE” from “Responsibility” and “Accountability” before being convicted by Courts. Our Judiciary too provide cover for that “Great Escape” by granting permission (legally) to “Go Abroad” while cases are pending. Example: The cases of Jaliya Wickramasuriya – our former Ambassador to USA and his own brother who was the Chairman of Airport and Aviation, Katunayaka. Recently both of them were found at a “Grand Party” along with the “respected” and “patriotic” crowd of Sri Lankans in Atlanta. Their “Human Rights” have been upheld? Dr. Udahama: Be assured none of these alleged “Criminals”(for robbing & plundering PEOPLES’ Wealth) will be found “Guilty” and “Executed”. Your request to President is very “TIMELY”?

  • 3
    0

    Further, it is a well known fact that drug trafficking has reached such high proportions mainly due to assistance received by major drug dealers through political connections and also from certain elements within the law enforcement establishment.

    Why is Human Rights Commission protecting them. Are drugs dealers taking the advantage of human rights code right to live and promoting the drug deal

  • 0
    0

    Dr. Udagama, While we admire and endorse your appeal to the President for repeal of the death penalty , the onus lies more on the cabinet of Ministers to oppose the very idea of reinstating same. It is reported that a few Ministers who did not agree but nevertheless did not oppose President’s wishes. Reasons are quite clear. This is the calibre of our politicians. As Dr. Udagama points out there are enough and more provisions in the Law to eradicate this menace. President, Prime Minister , Ministers , MPP. and Police are all aware as to who are involved in this and other criminal activities. Even glaring murder and many other extra judicial killings and disappearances are gaping over the public eye. To begin with will the God fathers and the king pins in the previous regime be brought before the law. I will bet my old pair of shoes it will never happen. Dogs will bark but the caravan will move.
    Mr. President and Prime Minister put your development goals aside for a while, rid the parliament and the public service from corrupt individuals by putting the laws in motion. Remember it is only the truth that will make you free.

  • 2
    0

    Our President now has become a laughing stock to the entire world. First he took the “Madu Walige” to punish the wrongdoers. Nothing happens. Then he took the “Sword ” to his hand against corruption. So far nothing happens except files belongs to Sajin Vaas Gunawardana and former chairman of Ports Authority, Priyath Bandu has gone missing from the Attorney General Dept. Now he is trying to do a Hangman’s Job. You first clean Prison Dept and Attorney General Dept. before do anything. People voted for you as their leader to lead the Country and not to do the executioner’ job. Gota still out in the open. Ambassador, A.S.P Liyanage , appointed by himself to Doha Qatar is now behaving like a mad man and trying to control the administration of only Sri Lankan school in Doha Qatar. That is enough Mr. President. You better go home after your term as you promised earlier. Let the General public to decide about next Leader. You are a failed miserable only elected leader in the world.

  • 0
    1

    The prez is very smart. Everyone knows very well Ven Gananasara has committed serious crimes against humanity in the name of Budhaha. He has has the right to defend our Budhists birth rights. If he doesnt, who will? The implementation of death penalty is just a trick to hang our leader Ven Gnanasara

  • 0
    0

    Does Pakistan’s new political results send us Sri Lankans a sacred message?

    Is there a Similar Messiah in ‘occultation” waiting to appear at the right time ?,who will be purifying our beloved land & uniting the people as one brotherhood ?

    Only someone who is not polluted with politics and someone who has no past dirt on him and one who can be easily loved by all people without race or religion be a reason or having to bow to businessmen with ulterior motives .

    It has to be someone with Zero political past connection and someone extremely popular and Clean

    Any ex politician always is under pressure by someone or other

    Wait & Hope
    Two great words

  • 0
    0

    Then implement whipping (lashes)………………

  • 2
    2

    Thengai Srinivasan.
    We need international judges to find murder and massacre of innocent Sinhalese by Tamils.
    Full stop.

    There was NIL massacre of Tamils in Sri Lanka
    Tamils are the most privileged community of Sri Lanka

  • 0
    0

    We can heave a sigh of great relief if death penalty is declared inhumane; not because criminals & drug dealers are saved but due to the fact that human society must have been of very high moral standard to declare thus.

    In such a high standard human society even sabre rattling or shooting to death in the battle ground too should also have been banned/ declared unacceptable.

    So all the active members of HR saving bodies & individuals including our own Deepika Udagama who cry to stop sentencing to death of criminals must come forward to cry stop killing even enemy forces in battle grounds.

    Unless your voice against imposing death penalty for drug dealers is certainly null & void.

  • 0
    0

    The first letter is signed “Dr. N. D. Udaganta Chairperson Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka”.
    The second is signed “Dr. N.D. Udagama, Chairperson, National Human Rights Commission of Sri Lanka”.
    Obviously a typo?

  • 3
    0

    Why bother about hanging? Take them somewhere under the pretext that they agreed to show where they have hidden drugs and shoot them. Give the usual reason Police give in such circumstances.
    ————————
    Use white vans for those drug kingpins who are roaming around freely.

  • 0
    0

    The President’s wrath that is directed at drug dealers is not based on morality or principle. He is furious with them on personal grounds. A close relative of his was caught taking drugs and he is very upset about it. So it is a personal vendetta and that is why he is prepared to act against everybody’s advice and even disregard the Buddha’s teachings. It is out of character for him to be so single-minded about punishing criminals because his customary role is to protect and provide succor to the villains.

  • 0
    0

    The ethics and moral issues associated with capital punishment is academic. Hundreds of books have been written and will be.
    .
    Let us consider the (hypothetical) case of a ten year old with a small amount of drug in his pocket. The boy says “My uncle so-and-so wanted me to carry it to so-and-so”.
    The Police say “There is no such so-and-so”. Can we be sure that one or both so-and-so bribed?
    .
    My main reason for opposing death penalty is that an innocent person (almost always poor) may be hung by the neck till death.
    .
    Duterte is projected to us as a Drug-fighting Superman. He has not succeeded at all. The tells his cronies “If the person you catch is rapeable, do this first before executing”.
    His human rights record stinks.

  • 2
    0

    It looks as though there is general agreement that Retributive Punishment amounts to a primitive way at looking at life and at ethics and religion. That capital punishment is not really a deterrent when applied to what we considered normal life, and normal crimes is also well documented. Spectacular executions harden the hearts of all citizens, and brings about a cheapening of life. Clearly, the War has done that already to society. This will continue that process of hardening all of us.
    .
    This present move to execute is born of weakness, not strength. We should forget all that, and get back to exploring more basic views. Incidentally, the most balanced article on the subject came after we’d all got tired of the subject; it deserves more reading:
    .
    https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/the-war-on-drugs-in-sri-lanka-science-or-fiction/
    .
    Life is getting more stressful by the day, because we have allowed our lives to drift away from the rhythms of nature. Yet everyone wants more of the supposed advances of technology.
    .
    I feel that one of the scientific fields that will advance rapidly is the study of the mind – not all aspects of it, may be, but forensic, perhaps. What happens when we are able to unerringly predict that a guy is going to be a criminal? Euthanise him as early and gently as possible? Those possibilities ought to shock most readers; but is this the sort of Brave New World that we are going towards?

  • 0
    0

    In a way Dr. Udugama is trying to bring some sense to the system, particularly from a human rights point of view. It perhaps is her duty. MY3 & Co, to whom I too voted for him for the change proved to a group that makes hay while the sun shines. As I have told before in a comment to a previous article, the motive for this move is not genuine, but blackmail. If you are a convicted drug trafficker under death sentence you are deemed to continue in the business and under that pretext you can be executed unless you prove otherwise by making the appropriate considerations periodically and it should be in crores. From that stand point, attempts of the Fair Chairperson are an utter waste of time. In fact, in an article published in the CT, the punishment itself, however severe, is not deterrence to crime, but, early detection, speedy trials etc. are factors of deterrence. In that context, if the HRC examines ways and means of expediting trials (not at the expense of quality) then it would be a protection of human rights of the litigants and deterrence to crime. That way the scatter brained schemes of some viewed only from the angle of fattening oneself, can be prevented. Over to you! Fair Doctor.

  • 0
    0

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  • 1
    0

    disciplene the police you will not need death penalty. Every high profile murder a policeman is arrested . The police is thus a criminal organisation not a police any more.

  • 0
    0

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