29 September, 2020

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Medical Mafia, Ethics & Education

By Hilmy Ahamed

Hilmy Ahamed

Hilmy Ahamed

Sri Lanka has exemplary health indicators and is often referred to as a model for other developing nations. This is due to the yeomen service provided by a number of dedicated health professionals. Yet, Sri Lanka is one of the few countries that a large number of mercenary medical professions and industry are allowed to hold the sick to ransom, despite the Hippocratic oath taken by its doctors.

One would hardly find a doctor who would give evidence against his or her own during times of medical neglect. Today, the medical industry has been commercialized to the extent that they hold the patient and their family’s hostage even after the death of a patient.

Medical conditions become emotionally desperate situations where the immediate family is obliged to provide the best to their sick, and in most cases way beyond what is affordable. This leads to situations where they just cannot afford to settle the final medical bills even to discharge the body after a death. The hospitals do not warn the patient’s family of the estimated costs. Even when they do, it probably is too late as the patient’s condition is far too vulnerable to move them out to an affordable facility. Recently, we received the welcome news of a Colombo court ordering the management of a private hospital to release the body of a deceased immediately to his close relatives, which was reportedly detained for several days until the hospital’s exorbitant bill was settled.

Further, the sky rocketing cost of the doctor’s fees is settled through a “chit” plundering the patient and defrauding the state of its taxes. This has been an accepted practice and the authorities are fully aware of this scam, yet no action has been taken against this unscrupulous practice, fearing incarceration by the industry and the wrath of the medical profession. There are no safeguards through the consumer protection authority or any other state institutions on the health industry due to the fear of trade union action by these shylocks, who want their pound of flesh. Their trade union action or holding patients to ransom is totally against the Hippocratic oath they take and are as hypocritical as their practice. The state should intervene firmly and ensure that the citizens are provided quality private medical facilities at an affordable cost because the majority of them have studied for “FREE” in our state universities and schools.

The health industry has become lucrative global ventures and there is high demand for medical education, which our state universities are unable to cope with. We now see a large number of students who pass the GCE A’ Level examination with above average results and are unable to enter local medical universities. They are leaving to study abroad at exorbitant costs and several other negative outcome. Parents who dream of a medical education for their children use their meager saving and sometimes sell or mortgage their valuable assets to provide this education abroad, eventually to lose them to some foreign nation. Very few countries offer full or partial scholarships for medical education. Sri Lanka Medical Council that has thwarted private medical education locally has no qualms about allowing these foreign graduates to work in Sri Lanka if they pass the Examination for Registration to Practice Medicine (ERPM) formerly know as act 16 examinations.

The students, who now attend foreign medical collages, are also eating in to the country’s scarce foreign exchange resources. This, and the negative cultural and social consequences of displacement could be easily avoided if private medical education is encouraged in Sri Lanka with state hospitals providing the necessary clinical facilities and other support for a fee if required. After all, this education is for our own children and they have the right to use the taxes paid by their parents. Yet, the Sri Lanka Medical Council and some student unions oppose this, citing various reasons. They have no reservations about the same students graduating from foreign universities and practicing alongside them locally. The often-claimed reason for opposing is their eligibility is due to their poor advanced level results. This is not true as they have passed the GCE A’ level with the requirements set as per the university grants commission. Further, if their grades are sufficient to follow medical education abroad that has been approved by the Sri Lanka Medical Council and are eligible to practice locally, they should have the option of studying locally in their own home environment. The investment Sri Lanka made on these smart kids on their primary education too is increasingly harnessed by foreign nations. Further, they are compelled to move away from their families, friends and culture, which in itself is a traumatic experience.

The Government provides free education up to the degree and even postgraduate levels. There are also private or international schools that have filled a vacuum for quality education by those who could afford it, but the opportunities for private school candidates who follow the international curriculum to enter local universities is restricted. There is also considerable social prejudice against these students. This is an infringement on their basic human rights. Their parents probably are all taxpayers. Many students therefore are forced to turn to private institutions in Sri Lanka or go abroad to obtain their degrees. While some foreign graduate and postgraduate programmes are offered and accepted, medical students continue to face many obstacles due to the medical mafia not allowing accreditation to any local private medical degree awarding programmes.

The basic education requirement to follow a medical degree course is 3 passes at A’ Level In the Science stream (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Mathematics). Today, even students who have all A grades in their advanced level are not guaranteed admission to a local university of their choice. As per a study undertaken by NR de Silva , A Pathmeswaran and HJ de Silva, “approximately 850–900 enter the six state medical schools in Sri Lanka. The university grants commission, with a policy that has remained basically unchanged for several decades, centrally administers this. “At present, 40% of seats are awarded on the sole basis of the GCE A level aggregate score (‘merit quota’), and 55% is divided among the 25 districts of Sri Lanka. The balance 5% is reserved for 13 ‘educationally underprivileged’ districts”

The district quota system was introduced to facilitate students from backward areas to enter universities with a lesser grade. This is seen by urban students as a breach of their fundamental right to seek university education on their merit, yet this is seen by the majority as an incentive for students from rural areas to have access to university education. While admitting it as an elitist notion to object to this concession, this quota system has been accused of being the destroyer of quality higher education in Sri Lanka. It is the responsibility of the state to provide quality education without discrimination to all its citizens.

In 2014, the former government of Mahinda Rajapaksa laid down plans to set up ten foreign universities in Sri Lanka by 2020, under its ambitious target of making Sri Lanka an international hub of excellence in higher education.

The University of Central Lancashire in Britain started their project of setting up a branch campus in Mirigama, Sri Lanka, with an investment of US $ 120 million. They have received tax holidays, along with duty waivers for items that are to be imported for the execution and implementation of the project. Regretfully, this has not taken off as yet and the much expected “laying of the foundation stone” during the visit of Prince Charles during his visit to CHOGM 2014 did not take place.

The first private medical collage was established in 1980 as the North Colombo Medical College. However, due to heavy opposition from the Marxist unions, some medical professionals, state university students and other professionals, the college was nationalized and renamed the Kelaniya Medical Faculty. The North Colombo Medical College as a private medical university was fully supported by a large number of medical professionals.

The next attempt at setting up a private medical college was the South Asian Institute of Technology and Medicine (SAITM). A brilliant concept and the brainchild of Dr Neville Fernando. This was undertaken in collaboration with the Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, Russian Federation. Here, the final year students were offered entrance to the Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy in Russia, which has been recognized by the Sri Lanka Medical Council, thereby allowing its graduates to practice medicine in Sri Lanka after passing the licensing examination.

SAITM also started a local MBBS programme 5 years ago. To provide clinical support, Dr Neville Fernando invested heavily in setting up the Dr Neville Fernando Teaching Hospital (NFTH), a 1002 bed facility ( a bed more than the Japanese grant of the Sri Jayawardenepura hospital to JR Jayawardene in recognition of his support at the Treaty of San Francisco or San Francisco Peace Treaty ). The hospital’s website claims “NFTH is not, yet another private hospital in the country, which charges exorbitant prices from their patients for the services provided. The hospital services are presented in such a way that it is very much affordable to the greater majority of the local population who are average or lower middle income earners, but never compromising on the service standards or the quality of medical care. As a socially responsible corporate citizen, Dr Neville Fernando Teaching Hospital (NFTH) reserves 20% of the operational bed capacity for the benefit of the less privileged patients offering free beds and medical care at a concessionary rate. It also charges heavily discounted and subsidized rates for the medicine, lab and radiologic investigations”.  A noble concept indeed.

The were recent media reports that Sri Lanka Medical Council has concluded that the clinical facilities for medical education at SAITM is inadequate and that it cannot be recognized as a medical degree awarding institution. There is an intake of students who are completing their degree programme this year, and now these students have complained to the human rights commission on the breach of their fundamental right by the Sri Lanka Medical Council. They also staged a peaceful demonstration outside the Sri Lanka Medical Council against their discrimination. Prof. Carlo Fonseka as President of the Sri Lankan Medical Council has accused the Neville Fernanda Teaching hospital of neglect and responsibility for the bacterial infection of the late Ven. Sobitha Thero while receiving treatment at the hospital.

This is seen as a ploy by the mafia to stir up a revolt against the noble initiative of Dr Neville Fernando and his social venture. Dr Fernando has taken steps to sue Prof. Fonseka for a staggering Rs. 500 Million for falsely accusing the hospital. It is indeed regrettable that Prof. Fonseka, an octogenarian has made such statement. Questions have been raised as to his medical capability at 83 to take rational decisions involving the health of the nation.

If the reasons for the Sri Lanka Medical Council rejecting the SAITM medical degree are valid, it is incumbent on the government to investigate and make necessary arrangements to support and ensure that the clinical facilities are upgraded to the required standards or provide access to clinical training for private medical education in state hospitals. If the well-equipped Dr Neville Fernando Teaching Hospital (NFTH) is below the required standard, It is incumbent on the government to support this socially conscious private entrepreneur to elevate the quality of patient care and clinical facilities to the required standards. After all, Dr Niville Fernando is also providing a yeomen service by providing subsidized medical facilities to the needy, which is the responsibility of the government. This will ensure that the degree offered by this private university is as good and recognized as any other in the country. The government should also assist in improving this hospital as there are no hospital facilities for the people of Battaramulla, Kaduwela, Malabe and beyond that is equipped with modern facilities.

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Latest comments

  • 0
    1

    Hilmy,
    Even though it is not entirely relevant to your article, your use of “FREE” with education is misleading. And misunderstood by many in SL. We didn’t get our education for free. CW Kannangara called it “NIDAHAS Adyapanaya”. Our education is not free, its cost is paid by our mothers and fathers (just 2-3% of direct/indirect TAXes paid by our mothers & fathers).. Some countries have this FREE education up to year 12 and some goes up to Uni. SL gov Uni education would have been more meaningful if students have to bear some percentage of cost (as an interest free loan pay back once they get employed).. This would eliminate 20,000 unemployable art graduates pass out every year, and more meaningful and useful Uni courses would appear.

    • 1
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      Yes, our tax money is what is being used and we pay for it, I fully agree that the unemployable graduate programmes are eliminated from the universities, but we will have huge protests from the JVP and other political unions as they would not have stupid students to come on to the streets and protest over everything. An iron fisted approach is needed

      • 3
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        No govt has the back bone to do reforms in health sector and education sector.

        Just look at our system. From the day you are born and until you are six feet under ground the expectation is that state should look after you. This includes free education including university education, govt jobs and a non contributory pension until you die!!!

        Ask the doctors to get lost if they cannot work for the salary paid to them after allowing private practice as well. What is required is a voucher system so that the public can visit any hospital of their choice to get the treatment they want. We need to create competion between public and private hospitals.

        Unfortunately no govt will want to take it on and that’s realty. Yahapalanaya is no better than MARA regime.

        None of the doctors doing private practice pay proper taxes. Every hospital has at least 20 consultants who earn in excess of Rs 5 m per month. All payments in cash, Interestingly these hospitals don’t show these payments in the annual report either due to they being only a collection agent.!!!

        • 5
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          This is a wrong comment of a person who has not stepped one foot away from major towns,I have worked as a consultant in Mullatiu and Bibile, no one of our consultants got more than 100000 from PP, I WORKED 2 WEEKS in a row and come home on a weekend in the Bus as I did not ha e funds to travel by car, my classmates who did not even got through A/L earn the same amount and stay at home every night and weekend
          This statements are due to pure jealousy, even a doctor who earns well by Pro ate practice dedicate all his leisure life to do so, when he goes home his children would be asleep
          As consultant I had the chance to stay back in Australia and earn 15 lacks per month salary and all the free time in the world, if you studied a bit harder you will also be able to get it, I Sril ha e that job if I want but I really prefer to stay here as this is my country and as obstetrician I can do immense help to the people, BUT thanks to people like you I think my decision is getting easier to make,in fact all ordinary man is against the doctors unless he’s ill, he needs a doctor to marry his daughter, when he needs his child to become one in this country,

          • 1
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            Dr. Who,

            The other side is not always greener even for Doctors. It is a crime and a waste spending public money for educating some of these so called ‘doctors’. So, if you have a good chance in Aussie, please go ahead. Do not worry about the poor of this country. Any how that’s what you guys do !

            You get the free education, you get excellent work experience through NHSL – without which you are no body and you are sponsored for various overseas seminars, workshops. If you are good at supporting pharmaceutical companies by way of prescribing medication, your whole family enjoys free holidays ! Don’t forget the respect you receive for a doctor in this country. Once you go to your greener pasture, you are just another Tom, Dick and a Harry running from one tube to another !

            How many of you guys declare your private practice earnings ? Still threatening to go on strike for a car permit.

            Shameless, shameless, shameless !

  • 0
    2

    “…the final year students were offered entrance to the Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy in Russia, which has been recognized by the Sri Lanka Medical Council”

    If I am not mistaken the SLMC actually refused to accept this joint training program a few years ago saying only students who completed their whole medical education at the Russian Campus were allowed to sit the exam to get SLMC registration.

  • 1
    0

    Thank you Hilmi for highlighting this injustice. I do not want to send my children abroad and two of them want to do medicine. I know as you say, I will lose them and they will also move away from our culture. So, we must get more people to support. My tax money need to be used for this and not for the bloody politicians to enjoy the perks. I am told that the Malabe University became controversial because the former higher education minister has been given shares. Is this true? I am ready to go to FCID so that they are brought to book.

    • 2
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      Get real Rasheed.If you have the money and if you think that your kids are bright enough to get a medical education abroad;do it .The culture of impunity is the culture in SL.The FCID is not going to help you.

  • 1
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    The problem is, people like Carlo fonseka who are stooges of the Rajapaksa’s has been told by the former regime to ensure that they have a piece of the pie. Dr Neveille fernando is no saint. The money is what he got from the stock market which was pumped up by Dilith and company. This is probably Russian underworld money and the Rajapaksa’s were not given part of the loot, so they were put in the back burner

  • 2
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    Protectionist Mentality will be a huge disadvantage to development, productivity and growth of a nation. Virtual e-education should offset the high cost of education in the near future. To recover the cost of education leads to unethical means as the ROI is years.

  • 4
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    A well articulated article on the tragedy facing the first batch of medical students at SAITM. The authorities should act without fear and get the SLMC to review. They are being controlled by external forces.

  • 4
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    I have two of my children studying there and if they cannot practice here, what is the use of their degree. I am not ready to keep quiet. Let us take these worms at the medical council before the law. Did all the government medical faculties including Ruhuna and Rajarata have full fledged clinical facilities when they started. It should be the government’s responsibility to facilitate as Ahamed says. I am a tax payer and my taxes should be used for the well being of our children

  • 4
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    An excellent analysis of the “Health, Wellness and Pharma Industry” and a timely exposure of how Doctors rip off patients and the Dept of Inland Revenue. All of us have experienced that little package of cash left at hospital counters for doctors to slip into their deep and murky pockets. All of us have experienced doctors arriving 1-2 hours late without a murmur of an apology and then rushing through their patients who have waited for them patiently, wheezing, sneezing and shivering..

    There are also rumors that doctors receive a “commission” on the aggregate value of tests ordered. Can this be true? And what about the bloodthirsty labs that spring up around government hospitals?

    Having said all this, I have also experienced doctors who practice the Hippocratic Oath right down to the last letter “…..I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick..” (extract from the modern version of the Oath).

    • 4
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      Couldn’t agree with you more. The doctors need to be disciplined, but any attempt will be a failure because they will resort to strikes holding the life of patients to ransom. My father used to say how former prime minister and president handled strikes by hospitals. We should even use mervin silva if necessary to send these doctors back yo hospital when the strike or check whether there are any suicide bommers left from the war

      • 0
        0

        I meant former Prime Minister and President Ranasinghe premadasa

      • 3
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        It is time for the civil society to start protesting against the demands of these corrupt and shameful Doctors.

        How do we go about this. Anyone ?

    • 3
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      It is not a rumour that they get a cut on the tests but the gospel truth. Most of when we go for a common illness have to go through a hundred and one tests. That cost alone would cure us for good. People who earn 30 or 40,000 end up spending 54 to 5 thousand on the simplest ailment because of these mercenaries. They need to understand that they will pay for it in this world or hereafter

    • 4
      1

      We must name and shame these GMOA guys and boycott their private practice.

      They are an insult to some good Doctors. Shameless SOBs. Most of them are children of government servants who are used to getting everything for free.

      Free education is a curse to this country !

  • 1
    0

    Hilmy Ahamed is talking only about the doctors and the hospitals. How about the pharmaceutical companies. They are the worst and bank roll the politicans including Sirisena when he was finister of health. Nimal Siripala used to get a 20% cut. His wealth is everywhere ad what is Yahapalanay doing. They have prostituted good governence

  • 3
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    Sad to see Hilmy supporting the murders of Sobitha thero. Has he got any vested intersts. Are his children at SAITM?

    • 6
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      I do not think that Sobitha Thero’s death was caused by any neglect at the hospital. He had a brilliant team of doctors taking care of him and I have checked through my doctor friends that the government hospitals are a million times worse for Hygine that neville fernando hospital..

  • 5
    0

    Hilmy works in media and why is he not using his channel to expose these scams. Private medical education is definetely the need of the hour in Sri Lanka as many of our youth disappear from the country for higher education and never come back, but Neville Fernando’s university is as expensive as an australian degree/ Why is it? Who is making the money? SB and his son who is basically controlling the board

  • 2
    2

    It is not the SLMC who is at fault but the private hospitals who are trying their best to destroy the image of the well equiped Neville Fernando Teaching Hospital, because if it succeeds, private medical costs would be more than halved and all the private hospitals who are milking the people to compete and lower their charges. They have invested well on Prof. Carlo Fonseka and his bunch of mercenaries at SLMC. I as a doctor feel that court action is the only course of action to be taken against the SLMC. Why Is Neville not doing it?

  • 4
    1

    A very timely article that should appear in the local news papers. The medical students at SAITM have already gone to the supreme court against the health Minister and it would be interesting to see whether the Supreme Court will allow the application. This is probably the best course of action. An appeal should also be made to the President and Prime Minister to intervene, and Ranil should encourage more foreign investment in medical education. After all, they could be exported to generate valuable foreign exchange for the country. Doctors are in great demand in the middle east and europe.

  • 1
    2

    “Dr Fernando has taken steps to sue Prof. Fonseka for a staggering Rs. 500 Million for falsely accusing the hospital.”

    Dr. Neville Fernando is a shrewd administrator. He now seeing a bright future for his Malabe Private Medical College. He will now blackmail Dr.Carlo Fonseka, President of the Sri Lanka Medical Council to now on work for him or end up paying Rs 500 million which he obviously does not have. Dr. Carlo Fonseka will now on become Nevile Fernando’s puppet, in other words the President of the Sri Lanka Medical Council will be Dr. Neville Fernando, Carlo will be his rubber seal!

  • 2
    6

    Good to see hilmy ahamed writing about important issues than fighting for his Muslim extremists who are destroying the Wilpattu reserve

    • 0
      0

      IG, which extremists, you are refering to ? which one ? The one who just moved in , after instigating chaos in our country( and also all over the world) from outside ? Can you remember ? they were giving military training to our soldiers and the so called tigers , simultaneuosly in thier apartheid and unlawfully installed country. Are you refererring to them? May be, it is going to be a reality in the future,since, we have given room to them , to set their b. boots in our country,may be they would teach , how to destroy forests reserves and human habitat and grab lands. Coz, they are the best of the best in this world….

    • 0
      0

      IG, which extremists, you are refering to ? which one ? The one who just moved in , after instigating chaos in our country( and also all over the world) from outside ? Can you remember ? they were giving military training to our soldiers and the so called tigers , simultaneuosly in thier apartheid and unlawfully installed country. Are you refererring to them? May be, it is going to be a reality in the future,since, we have given room for them , to set their b. boots in our country,may be they would teach , how to destroy forests reserves and human habitat and grab lands. Coz, they are the best of the best in this world….”IN THAT AREA” So,,Let us be vigilant and be united to safe guard Our Mother Lanka..

  • 2
    1

    The doctors continue to intimidate government with the threat of trade union action. Now, the government have succumb to their threats and agreed to pay one million as extortion money instead of their car permits. Why is it that a selected few are given all these privileges from the tax payers money? Isn’t there anyway tis could be stopped. If Educated government servants could resort to this form of extortion, is there any rule of law? Why is it that the petty criminals are changed in court for the slightest breach of the law and the big sharks are allowed to hold an entire nation to ransom. One day, this si going to explode and the exploited will take the law in to their own hands and start butchering off their vital parts.

    • 1
      0

      Totally agree. Should allow them to go on strike and expose them to the world !

  • 3
    0

    the despicable nature to which our professionals have fallen is unbelievable. They are an insult to the dedicated Doctors, Lawyers etc of the past whose conduct was impeccable. Unless a code of ethics and accountability are forcibly enforced this country would never be able to progress. It is time that action is taken by the yahapalanaya govt as it is an urgent need for a stable society.

    • 1
      3

      We need a Sinhala Prabaharan to deal with these miscreants, some one who can squeeze their B…ls hard enough for them to remember for life, or even better chop them off. The free education they get needs to be reimbursed by decent taxation to these mercenaries. I dont think any government can do it for the fear of their strike action. It is the peoples vigilante’s who need to reign n these unscrupulous elements. May all the gods of this universe give that strength

  • 1
    0

    Point of viw, the people will have to get together and raid these places, and bring them to justice. It will happen sooner than later if this status quo remains

  • 0
    0

    C.W.W.Kannangara gave free English education only.
    Swabasha was free.
    Until 1948, all aspiring to do medicine, had to pass London Matriculation, or exemption from it on the results of the Senior School Certificate examination. The Higher School Certificate examination was the University Entrance Examination.
    In 1950, top 70 marks scorers were selected for medicine, next 20 for dentistry & last 20 for veterinary science.
    Then came the District Quota system to admit low scorers.

    Nosocomial ‘hospital acquired’ Infections are common.

    http://www.healthline.com/health/hospital-acquired-nosocomial-infections#Overview1

    Sobitha Thero probably was a victim.

    SAITM is essentially a business venture and lured admissions on false promises of recognition by the SLMC – now under litigation.
    In any country, qualification for medical degree admissions are the toughest, with good reason.
    Drug market corruption is common in the under developed countries
    Developed countries, eg. UK have their own list of drugs.
    The website of British National Formulary can be downloaded from the internet.

  • 4
    0

    The Medical profession has it’s quota of unethical rogues, but that is no reason to vilify the profession.
    Sri Lanka has a system which provides basic care to the poor but costly procedures not available freely. The government spends a measly 2.9% of the GDP on healthcare, and the GDP is nothing to write home about. The doctors are poorly paid but provide a pretty decent service. They supplement their income with private practice, and some do very well though they work well into the evening. It is that which has attracted the envious eyes of the many ( I shall not attempt to describe them). The desire for private medical schools was to accommodate the offspring of the ‘wealthy’ mudalalis, lacking the necessary A-levels. Others with sufficient funds had access the many Medical schools abroad (e.g. Nepal, China, Eastern Europe and the Caribbean) catering to this very crowd.
    Colombo and Peradeniya graduates at one time were recognised and sought after abroad. The story is different today.

    • 3
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      That is because the wrong breed have entered the profession. They do not have values, and their background cannot understand ethics. They are a money mongering lot who have suddenly got recognition. This is the tragedy of the Gamaya going to university

  • 4
    2

    The gov. should get out of the health care providing business. It should sell all hospitals to private companies. The gov. should act only as a health insurance provider for the poor who can’t afford to buy premiums. All employers including gov. sector should provide health insurance for all their employees. This will ensure no GMOA strikes and better and efficient health care for all.

  • 1
    1

    This is a controversy which has been happening since the Ragama Medical Collage was challenged by the Kelaniya university students and the JVP as well as leftist parties saw this as prelude to privatization of universities. At that time, there were no degree awarding private universities.

    It is time for the government tp rethink this policy as the brain drain is huge when children are sent abroad for education. They get used to the life in alien countries and will never come back. Apart from the brian drain, the aging parents have no one to take care of them and has huge cultural and social ramifications.

    I cannot understand why this hooligans in our universities have to protest. Almost all of them are from the arts stream and they are definitely not fit to be in universities. This is what the quota system has done to our education. While it would be nasty to say, if they were kept in their paddy fields, the quality of education in sri lanka would have continued to be among the best

  • 2
    0

    Consultants charges are very high and how can the poor man pay, in a famous hospital the consultabt fees is 1500 the hospital charges is 500 that is 33% of the consultants fees and for the e channeling it is around 300 which is 20% of the consultants fees.this is day light robbery by the hospitals.

    • 0
      1

      Dr Roshan, the doctors fee is not 1500. It is a lot more and there are doctors who give probably 10 numbers at a normal fee and if you have to consult them, the hospital will give a special number which is three times the normal consultation fee. This was started by a doctor de mel and it has now become usual practice for all popular consultants. This will only stop if a few doctors throats are sliced by patients. It doesnt matter if they have to go to gallows, because the doctors and hospital fees will kill them anyway

      • 0
        0

        You must be familiar with ‘Market forces’. Why a popular doctoer should command the same fee as one who isn’t does not stand to reason. As they say ‘you pays your money and takes your choice’.

  • 2
    0

    University Education should be given on merit – Quota System Should be scrapped. Student’s who do not enter the Medical Faculty Enter find employment as Medical Representatives – and educate the Doctors with the drugs what they Market and in return they prescribe. Give the best student the right to enter the University. Even the best rural student gets a good school after Grade 5.

    Parents spend money to educate the children to enter the University at the end they start their University Life carrying a Till and begging. This is the right they are fighting for

  • 2
    1

    The best do is to adopt a Mr JR policy being an emergency profession . if the doctors are fail to work and consider them that they left the job.We all may go through a painful time but we can get doctors half the price from India .I am employed in Dubai and have witnessed many occasions that the doctors are carrying their resume walking one clinic another to find a suitable place /clinic.

    the government should not afraid that doctors are leaving the country and even they go aboard they can work as a doctor unless they sit for those exams and get through and i know many of them are working at elder homes as care takers even bus drivers in Canada .

    Doctors are enjoying privileges in SL and they are all equal to all other citizen since its their profession and we should not categorized citizens by profession and this kind of approach would lead to many problem in the society .

  • 3
    1

    These people get their education free at the tax payers expense, and once they start practicing, they never pay taxes, and then they want tax exceptions to buy vehicles, what kind of nonsense is this. As far as I know no other country provides such duty free facilities.

    Instead of being a blessing to the society they have become a bunch of blood suckers, shame on them

  • 3
    1

    Doctors in SL are respected and honoured by the public. Doctors have taken this to their advantage and become TAX EVADING BUSINESSMEN AND WOMEN. Doctors in SL are similar to investment bankers in the west. Money is God for them. They have no morals or ethics.
    Stopping the car permits is a good start. Tighten the tax system, collect taxes from these scoundrels. Do not worry about these so called Dosters leaving abroad. They will not stand a chance.
    Over to you PRESIDENT MAITHRI AND PM RANIL.

  • 0
    0

    1. It is the responsibility of the government to provide training for the required number of doctors for the country’s need. You don’t need private medical schools to train more than the required number of doctors. There is a big shortage of Dental surgeons and Vet. surgeons. The talent should be diversified for the countries need. Brains are in short supply.
    2. Public should be educated to see that going to the private hospital is not the best all the time.
    3 Private hospitals should not practice commercial medicine.( A lady admitted her son to a private hospital to get IV fluids because he was feeling tired after a tennis match.)The hospital and doctors should have told her to give oral fluids .But they capitalised on her ignorance and charged a large sum of money for this stupid treatment.
    4.Introduce the annual appraisal system and five year revalidation system as in the United Kingdom.
    5.Make medical services as essential service and ban them from taking strike action .
    6,Stop giving free car permits as they earn enough to pay tax and buy cars.
    7.Start training programme for General practice and get all the GP’s trained ,so to stop under trained doctors becoming money minting GP’s with out expanding their knowledge.

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