13 April, 2024

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Politics Beyond 22

By Tisaranee Gunasekara

“You are in the end – what you are.” ~ Goethe (Faust)

22 is not perfect. Far from it, perhaps light-years far. Yet, in a season of defeats and setbacks, it is a win for Lankan democracy, and for those Lankans who would be free citizens rather than obedient subjects or terrified children waiting for the next saviour. 

The passing of the 22nd Amendment (officially 21) came hard on the heels of another democratic victory. The Supreme Court effectively killed the deadly Rehabilitation Act. If President Wickremesinghe or the Rajapaksas dreamed of using the Act to punish past dissent and discourage future protests, that dream is now dead.  

The two wins demonstrate that however flawed or even dysfunctional the Lankan political system might be it’s not broken. It can be built on, improved. The better kind of ‘system change’, the sort that harms less, roots deep, lasts long.

By 2014, the Rajapaksas had disembowelled every single democratic institution in the country, from the highest court to the lowliest pradesheeya Sabha. Only periodic elections remained, a heads-we-win-tails-you-lose game the family believed it had mastered. Wrongly. Mahinda Rajapaksa lost the presidency and democracy made a comeback. The Sirisena-Wickremesinghe administration removed the executive’s mailed fist from the collective back of the judiciary and paved the way for more institution-building than any previous administration via the 19th Amendment and the Right to Information Act. 

Electoral defeat also revealed the ordinary clay in the Rajapaksa makeup, diminishing the shock-and-awe effect created by the war-victory. High King Mahinda and Supreme General Gotabaya were downsized to normal size, for a while. The memory of that reduction had faded by 2018, but not dead. In 2022, as normal life collapsed under the cumulative weight of shortages and queues, that memory would return. Without its liberating effect, the peaceful revolt of the middle class which constituted the first inspiring phase of the Aragalaya couldn’t have happened. 

Thus the importance in the death of the 20th and the safe birth of 22nd, especially if ‘system change’ is a real goal and not just a radical-sounding slogan or an excuse to scuttle reforms. The next step is its speedy implementation. What was done to the democratising 17th Amendment by the PA and the UNP mustn’t become the fate of 22: death by non-implementation. Having taken the sensible step of backing the amendment, the SJB and the JVP should focus on getting the constitutional council and the national procurement commission up and running. That is of far greater democratic consequence than holding local government elections, an exercise which will cost billions and change little. 

The composition of COPE, COPA, and the Peoples’ Council has caused much handwringing and derisive laughter. Deservingly. But almost all the undesirables nominated to those bodies were elected by the people in 2020; more worryingly many would be re-elected thanks to the preferential vote system. A new electoral system is as much of a democratic (and anti-corruption) necessity as abolishing the executive presidency. 

President Wickremesinghe’s decision to set up a committee to map a new electoral system may – or may not – be a ruse to postpone elections. Either way, it opens up a path to a desirable and popular goal. If the proposal is a Wickremesinghe-bluff, the Opposition can surely call it by coming up with reform blueprints which combine the best features of the PR and first-past-the-post system? Pertinently, what is the Opposition’s stand on the Election Commission mandated campaign finance legislation awaiting cabinet nod? Surely enacting that piece of legislation should be as much of an oppositional priority as calling for elections? 

The Quotidian Rot

In the 19th century, there was an American political organisation called the Know Nothing Party which fared well electorally for a while. A nativist entity (not in the Native American but in the WASP-supremacist sense) it was anti-Black, anti-Catholic, and anti-Semitic. That party is now gone and mostly unremembered, but its spectre survives and thrives across the world. From the US to India, from Italy to Sri Lanka, know-nothing (and learn-nothing) voters and politicians are making choices that invite chaos. 

US humorist Andy Borowitz asked, “What happens when you combine ignorance with performing talent?” and answered, “A president who tells the country to inject bleach” (Profiles in Ignorance: How America’s Politicians Got Dumb and Dumber). Or a president and a political family who take over a functioning economy and run it to the ground. 

Mr. Borowitz divides ignorance into three stages, ridicule, acceptance, celebration. In Sri Lanka, we ridicule ignorance and accept it by voting the ignorant in. When hiring a driver, any sensible person would prioritise driving skills and experience over the width of a smile, the jauntiness of a moustache or the smoothness of a tongue. But the same person may act antithetically when deciding who should be at the national wheel for the next five years. After all, every Rajapaksa fault we decry now was fully or partly in evidence during their previous terms. Accountability is necessary not just for politicians, but also for the people who vote them in and out. If our people fail to understand their culpability for their own plight, how can they be persuaded not to remake the same old mistakes?  

As Liz Truss’ tenure as the UK’s prime minister entered its 6th chaotic week, Daily Star, a British Tabloid, launched the lettuce challenge. Would the premiership of Ms. Truss last longer than the lifespan of an ordinary iceberg lettuce? The lettuce won. And perhaps saved our former imperial masters from going the Lankan way. Had we stuck to the parliamentary system, we could have got rid of the Rajapaksas without the murder and the mayhem (no, it wasn’t all poetic and peaceful; the lynching of two men is murder and the burning of scores of houses, irrespective of the unsavoury nature of many of their owners, is mayhem). Institutional guardrails matter, especially where Know Nothings hold sway.

The rot is not limited to the government. Sajith Premadasa recently held a cosy powwow with that doyen of ideological racism, Dr. Gunadasa Amarasekara, and his majoritarian-supremacist National Organisations Collective. According to the media unit of the leader of opposition, “Opposition leader elucidated the importance of not making further amendments to the 13th Amendment,” and, said that “There are no ethnic minorities, there are different ethnic groups, all should get together and rebuild the country.” According to the Sinhala version, the opposition leader, “will not agree to any proposal that will lead to the fragmentation of the country by empowering the 13th amendment.” No ethnic problem, no need for a political solution: wasn’t that the Rajapaksa mantra too? The 13th Amendment equates division, wasn’t that the abiding cry of the most virulent of racists? Is this an attempt to shift to a Gotabaya-lite position and win with Sinhala votes only? 

Mahsa Amini, Nika Shakarami, Sarina Esmailzadeh: three names amongst many unnamed victims of a struggle that began with a simple demand, the right to not wear a hijab. 

Lankans probably look with a sense of complacent superiority at the events in Iran. But the rallying slogan of the Iranian schoolgirls, telling clerics to get lost, is valid here as well. After all, we too are plagued with clerics who try to impose their will on secular matters they know nothing about, from economics to sex education, often with distressing success.

Iran’s ongoing uprising, with its stirring cry of Woman, Life, Freedom, began when a young Kurdish woman died in the custody of the Morality Police. We don’t have a morality police, but morality policing is not unknown here, including on matters sartorial. In the aftermath of the Easter Sunday massacre, a coat-and-tie clad top state official tried to make sari-wearing mandatory for female public officials. Banning first year female students from wearing trousers seems to be a fairly standard component of the orgy of cruel and unusual activities that passes off as ragging in Lankan universities. 

The dean of arts faculty of the Peradeniya University is on record saying that students studying in the English medium are banned by the Students Union from using common facilities such as the canteen. Universities in Sri Lanka are not havens of democracy, open mindedness, and intellectual curiosity but deserts of intolerance, tyranny, and backwardness. Ragging is both a symbol of that mindset and its progeny. And all this by student unions and organisations under the control of the JVP and the FSP. The two parties can end this barbarism with one command (inner-party democracy is more alien to them than it is to their bourgeois counterparts). They haven’t, yet. In the universities where the two parties hold sway, even simple acts of dissent like opposing ragging is a punishable crime. The Rajapaksas are not the only problem we have. 

On the need for deals

The petition filed by the Transparency International against the decision makers of the current disaster, starting with Gotabaya, Mahinda, and Basil Rajapaksa, has been granted leave to proceed by the Supreme Court. The case will hopefully cast some much needed light on who ordered, who enabled, and who consented to what in making this avoidable tragedy.

The 2019 November unfunded tax cut was the first outpost on that road to disaster, the error that made every other error necessary. Repairing that mistake is a necessary step in rescuing the economy without imposing even more burdens on the already overburdened poor. Will the Opposition, especially the economically more sensible SJB, propose constructive amendments to tax proposals instead of taking the easy way of damning the whole? One obvious need is to increase the tax-free threshold from the proposed 100,000rupees per month to at least 150,000rupees per month, to cushion the lower middle class and small businesses. Rates for upper brackets can be increased to make good the loss. (The GMOA is threatening strike action, true to form. Since most of that trade union’s members would not have become doctors without our free education system, their opposition to direct taxes is particularly despicable).

What is morally indefensible and politically dangerous is to increase taxes – any taxes – without touching the innumerable privileges enjoyed by the political class. The opposition can make a deal to combine tax increases with the drastic pruning of these giveaways – the pension system, duty free vehicle permit racket, giving official residences to all ministers and an official vehicle to all elected representatives, to mention but a few. Not likely, since the one subject on which the entire political class is agreed (from the UNP to the JVP, from the Rajapaksas to the TNA) is the sacrosanct nature of these unearned and unmerited privileges. 

In her poem Working on the World, A Revised Improved Edition, Polish poet and 1996 Nobel Laureate Wislawa Szymborska, approaches her utopia of a good life and a good death in stages, starting with “fun for fools and tricks for old dogs.” Striving for incremental changes is more effective than dreaming of or chasing utopias. Given where we are, no improvement, however minute, should be scoffed at. Foreign remittances have gone up in August and September. Litro is making profit again and reducing prices. The Welisara Magistrate Court has ruled to provide legal protection to a young lesbian woman from the persecution of her parents (and the Welisara police). Women parliamentarians across the aisle have prepared an amendment defining anyone under 18 as a child. The Orwellian attempt to use the police to gather information on Colombo residents has been abandoned. To a drowning nations, straws can spell survival.

Our descent into economic disaster did not happen overnight. Our emergence from that abyss cannot happen overnight either. A parliamentary election might help that long climb or it might not. How an election impacts on the crisis would depend on the percentage of citizens willing to let facts rather than emotions decide their vote. If even 10% of voters cleave to the Rajapaksas (the real figure is likely to be double) despite their culpability for our common plight, an election is likely to worsen rather than alleviate the crisis.

A fragmented parliament, and the resultant horse trading for power and influence while hunger soars and poverty deepens, can sunder hope in the democratic system. Once popular faith in electoral solutions breaks down, the Sinhala masses are more likely to seek salvation not from the JVP or the FSP, but from the military, and the monks, their brothers in blood and faith.

The saga of 22 shows that Ranil Wickremesinghe is not a Rajapaksa clone. Had the opposition put personal rancour and political needs aside and worked with Mr. Wickremesinghe once he became the president, a better 22 and other reforms could have been possible. Who can doubt that post-election every party currently in opposition will make whatever deals possible to gain a larger share of the power-pie? Better to make some deals now with the Wickremesinghe government, not for the sake of power, but to promote the sort of political and economic reforms that would help Lankan democracy and Lankan people survive the crisis, and perhaps even emerge a little stronger.

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Latest comments

  • 3
    0

    TG, You have summarised well the saga of 22. Why was nothing really acceptable in government before or after 1948 and needed so many changes in constitution. Why parliament is so messed up is due to the fact that all in it are so self centered on what they can grab and rob rather than the reason that they are there to govern the nation for the benefit of all citizens. We are not unique. The global one world order trying to unify chalk and cheese has many methods involving numerous groups without any integrity, honesty, righteousness or justice. Twisted religions have been used to try to produce good outcome, but they cannot do it. There is only one real truth in this world and we need to find that alone and abide by that to live satisfied lives.

    • 3
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      All Sri Lankans are predominantly self-centered!!??

      • 2
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        Corrected by myself, South Asian Trait!!??

        • 4
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          Thanks for exposing Sajith Premadasa. I have been saying in these colums that he like his father is anti-Tamil, anti-India and anti-devolution and that in order to cover up his inefficiency and inability to counter Rajapakses, will surrender to Sinhala racism. Now that is coming true. Sajith Premadasa will never win without support of Tamils, and if thinks that he can take Tamils for granted, he is sadly mistaken. As for Ranil Wickremasinghe, he will continue to play double games and will put the country in a mess. Through his lackey Sumanthiran he is spreading a propaganda that political solution to Tamils will come in one year, which is a blatant lie. He is also bluffing about missing persons, releasing of prisoners and occupied lands. He went to Trincomalee and announced that it will be developed with Indian assistance, which will be kept on delaying giving vague reasons, which is made purely to keep India quiet, when there is concern about Chinese being clandestinely allowed to set foot in the north. On the economic front too, he is bluffing IMF and finally no loan will be given, and foreign investment will come.

  • 10
    1

    How and why the Aragalaya came about is quite a pertinent question.
    My answer:
    The younger lot was feeling the pain of a dysfunctional system.
    Nothing more; nothing less.
    .
    Anybody who thinks that the Aragalaya is a passing footnote in our history will live to regret it.
    .
    What about 22A? How good, bad or necessary is it?
    Knowing our people and understanding our politicians I am not thrilled at all; I am disappointed.
    22A is a stalling tactics.
    .
    But, I have hope. Since the beautiful Aragalaya is not dead and gone, it will sprout nice with dashing colours.

    • 9
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      Nathan

      “Since the beautiful Aragalaya is not dead and gone, it will sprout nice with dashing colours.”

      However many members of middle and upper middle classes wishes the Aragalaya disappeared and dead and gone as it has fulfilled a particular function, making available of essential goods (including fuel) and medicine.

      It appears Aragalaya is seen as a guest who has over stayed his/her welcome.

      The middle and upper middle classes don’t give a toss about anything else.

      • 2
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        NV, You get some kind of sadistic pleasure in dampening my spirits, don’t you!

        • 4
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          Nathan

          “NV, You get some kind of sadistic pleasure in dampening my spirits, don’t you!”

          Never, not in a million years did I think so.
          I was reporting what I gathered from ground.
          I have hopes for Aragalaya, they should set out to achieve whatever their goal is before they reach their 40s and become millionaires.

          I wish them well.
          I am an optimist.
          Wish you happy Diwali.

          • 7
            2

            Native,
            “However many members of middle and upper middle classes wishes the Aragalaya disappeared and dead and gone as it has fulfilled a particular function, making available of essential goods (including fuel) and medicine.”
            All classes, actually. Even the Maligawatta flat dwellers have their LPG. Others have milk powder (at a price). The IUSF wants a revolution. The flat dwellers don’t.
            The Aragalaya was popular when it was a place where you could get free food. Now you risk a broken head.

            • 9
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              “Accountability is necessary not just for politicians, but also for the people who vote them in and out. If our people fail to understand their culpability for their own plight, how can they be persuaded not to remake the same old mistakes? “
              Absolutely true. It is the people that elected all the crooks that they object to now.
              Did the people protest on the streets, Aragalaya-style, when Dr. Shafie was framed by a cabal of monks, shameless media, and other doctors and Professors?
              Did the people protest en masse when Muslims were being cremated on utterly unscientific grounds?
              Did the people protest when the same monks who told them to vote for Gota now complain about not getting free electricity? Why do they not protest at the gates of the temples where these parasites reside?
              I don’t think anything has changed.

              • 6
                1

                “The dean of arts faculty of the Peradeniya University is on record saying that students studying in the English medium are banned by the Students Union from using common facilities such as the canteen.”
                And who controls these unions? The FLSP and the JVP.
                Yes the same crowd that claims to be the Aragalaya these days. Enough said.

                • 3
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                  Kaduwa and Kaththa Fight??

              • 3
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                Nothing in Paradise, ever changes for the better!!?? False hopes!
                Always down the GURGLER and near extinction, then begging for resurrection?? All this time, have been Lucky to be salvaged!
                Every day is not Christmas!!??

            • 3
              3

              “The Aragalaya was popular when it was a place where you could get free food. Now you risk a broken head.”
              The popularity was not just for free food, as Douglas D would have it.
              But it was mostly an inducement from certain interested parties. There were smaller players to among donors, who meant well.
              It was mostly a middle class crowd and free food was not any kind of priority.
              The Aragalaya lacked an agenda, and many of its cheerleaders on the social media saw a revolution where there was none in sight, and the Aragalaya was easily misled into adventurism.
              The country is a bigger entity than the Colombo middle class.
              IUSF has to join hands with those who really need a social change. Things like that do not happen overnight.
              *
              Anyone who is not ready to risk a broken head is not quite ready to transform society. The risk is there even far from where the action is, for the state is always on the watch.

              • 5
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                SJ,
                Most were simply demanding petrol, food, electricity and LPG, the very basics that the arrogant Gota and his self-important Viyathmaga screwed up. The revolutionaries were left stranded when these things were provided. Who wants to be protesting instead of doing a job?

                • 0
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                  OC
                  The ones who need change badly are not the urban middle class youth.
                  Those wanting radical change stepped in a little later.
                  And they seem serious, and that is why I have some faith in them.
                  But I concede that delivery is not as easy as a dip in the President’s swimming pool.

          • 4
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            Native, what do you think about the recent CCP meeting. 1) Former President and immediate predecessor of Xi, Hu Jintao was mysteriously escorted out (forced out by bouncers) of the closing ceremony. Video showing Hu siting right next to Xi, reluctant to leave, finally turning towards Xi looking for answers. 2) The PM Li Keqiang was not only removed after two terms but was removed from the all powerful deciding committee. 3) The new PM Li Qiang’s rise to the top may come as surprise, since he was lambasted for poorly handling Covid outbreak in Shanghai Province but being Xi’s “yes man” has it’s advantage. Many had tipped Qiang to not to rise in the party hierarchy following his mismanagement of outbreak. 3) Finally Rishy Sunak may become the next PM, considered as groundbreaking milestone in British political history. Months ago, I remember typing “seeing the name Rishy Sunak in potential Premier list it self, I consider as progress”.

            • 4
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              Native, 1) U.K has first Indian origin as PM amidst racist Nazi editorial comments expressed by Kommersant daily news paper, not from U.K but Russia. 2) U.S where a black or a woman becoming President is thought to be a taboo , had Obama not one term but two and now Kamala as number two. 3) India had a Muslim and now a tribal as President 4) Based on meritocracy countries have even elected ,non politicians including LGBTQIA +++++ etc . . . . etc. . . . ..whereas Silly / Stupid Lankans continue with their excuses (how we were screwed by the Colonial) and keep electing corrupt Mafia Family members, murderers,kidnappers, drug peddlers and other criminals to higher position.

              • 5
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                chiv

                India already had 4 Muslim presidents.
                By the way you got to be careful when you make rational comment openly as Wijedasa is looking carefully into every legitimate, relevant …. comment people or their representatives make inside or outside the parliament.

                Now Wije wants to sue and probably expel Sumanthiran (who seems to be one of a few legal eagles who also possess balls) and shut his mouth permanently. This is what Sumanthiran told the parliament “The Supreme Court also has swung like a pendulum unfortunately. In the 19th amendment bill they permitted various changes and said this doesn’t require a referendum, but now those identical changes, the same supreme court says you require a referendum. Now people have to be told this as well, its not only the Parliament that swings like a pendulum, Its the Supreme Court also. Change the Supreme Court also. Ask them also to go home. If they can’t read and understand their own determination in the 19th amendment with the very same words, within a few years, they say now this requires referendum.”
                https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/22nd-amendment-people-are-never-fooled/

                Racists can’t stand truth or able people.

                When and by whom MPs’ parliamentary privileges (not corrupt corrupt prerogatives) have been prohibited?

                I humbly urge our young Nimal Fernando to do something about this mess and the racists who wield enormous power.

                • 0
                  0

                  Native Vedda,
                  Time for some poking!
                  I notice that Nimal Fernando has run out of ideas, – jokes to be precise.

                • 1
                  0

                  Native, I agree with you about Wijedasa. To me people like him are of the worst kind. As you say this guy is extremely racist and a hypocrite causing much more harm than SW and Rajapaksas. Our SC is as good as our parliament. They work for each other, so much so they all need to go. Systemic change should include SC , Judiciary, AG, Low and Odor, next in list after parliamentarians.

            • 2
              0

              chiv

              It will take years for us to learn all those palace coups/ palace intrigue taking place in China. Let us leave it to SJ. According to him Chinese are a descent lot unlike the Hindians.

              This is what Chinese Ambassador to Sri Lanka Qi Zhenhong typed in todays Daily Mirror:

              General Secretary Xi Jinping proudly declared, “From this day forward, the central task of the CPC will be to lead the Chinese people of all ethnic groups in a concerted effort to realize the Second Centenary Goal of building China into a great modern socialist country in all respects and to advance the rejuvenation of the Chinese nation on all fronts through a Chinese path to modernization.”

              I remember reading after the Cultural Revolution Mao has reached all goals of building China into a great modern socialist country.

              I wonder why China wants to reach the same goal again.

              old codger any idea?

  • 4
    0

    Amendment 22 has been passed. However, what would happen to the 10 dual citizens of M. PP who are now serving in the house? As per Mr. Mahinda Rajapakse they will remain and 22 will not affect them. He is in the driving seat of the present administration, but he behaves similarly to being in a hanging-over mood, while the brothers also seem to be in opposite camps; how could the country survive until a new election?

  • 4
    1

    Happy Diwali to all CT readers.
    On the Diwali Day a South Asian Hindu became the PM of UK, The youngest PM of modern time and first South Asian

    Contrast to Sri Lanka, carry on electing octogenarians as President and other high offices even as leader of TNA

    Contrast to Sri Lanka, lets carry on with the racist policies ….where even Booker Price winners are ridiculed

    • 4
      1

      Rajash

      Could you check if Rishi is part of Mahinda’s extended family.
      Mahinda has a habit of gate crashing under the pretext of being related to South Indians.

      • 4
        0

        Native,
        Rishi isn’t South Indian. He was born in UK to to Punjabi parents from East Africa ( the Idi Amin generation).
        Mahinda will have a hard time cuddling up.

        • 5
          1

          old codger

          Alright.
          Tamils as well as Sinhalese sermonize how badly the English (white-man) treat nonwhite in the UK, nevertheless the right wing (?) conservative party has chosen a nonwhite, non-christian, dark skinned, ….. person to man the top job.

          How would you reconcile being racists and electing an Indian descendant as it Prime Minister?

          When will the Sinhala/Buddhist Aryans elect a non Sinhala/Buddhist non Aryan to the top job?

          When will the Sangas let non Govi Sinhalese ordain under Malwattu/Asgiria chapters?

          • 1
            0

            Native,
            White people can rule brown people, but not the other way around.
            https://youtu.be/2t952Gnpjr0

            Watch from 10.03.

            • 0
              0

              OC
              India had 3 (+ 1 acting) Muslim presidents, and 2 Dalits, 2 women (one an Adivasi), and a Sikh too as presidents.
              What has that meant for the communities that they came from, except for some satisfaction of sorts?
              What did a Black president (with real power unlike the ones in India) achieve for the blacks?
              Britain is as racist as the US. The Tories are totally bankrupt politically, and their choice of Boris was a clear sign.
              Sunak is no magician, and one has to see if he has an alternative to the policies that grew out of Brexit.
              I doubt success, but will not blame Sunak, who is constrained by Tory policies.

            • 0
              0

              OC
              India has thus far had several Muslims, a Sikh, two Dalits and two women (one a tribal).
              Are any of the groups, except the Sikhs perhaps, any the better for these appointments?
              Has a Black president transformed the life of the American Black?
              An Indian PM is there because the Tories are plain bankrupt and have no native alternative.
              It is not Sunak that will be struggling with the economic problem but Tory polices.

        • 2
          1

          Rishi is Punjabi, but his wife is South Indian. Her family name is Murthy. Definitely a South Indian name. She was born in Hubli in Karnataka. I think she is a Kannada Brahmin. The billions come from her side of the family.

          • 0
            0

            There were some hopes pinned on one Kamala in the US not long ago.
            Do Kannadigas love Tamils?

  • 4
    0

    TG
    Another excellent article
    “System Change” will automatically come about if there are EFFECTIVE Councils are established to control the BEHAVIOUR of all professions. eg Doctors have the SL Medical Council
    Likewise the Lawyers & Judges; Journalists; Clergies; Politicians etc needs to function under certain criteria.

  • 3
    0

    22A needs to be appreciated and the nation needs to move on. The commissions speedily established and then look forward to other improvements. It is time to stop talking about the 10 dual citizens. They know what they are. It is up to them to do the right thing. There is no benefit to the country agonizing about these individuals. If taxes are to be increased on wages then there needs to be a drastic reduction of political privileges accorded to politicians. Vehicles and houses and removing these completely or partially is of the most importance. Abolishing vehicle permits and garnishing salaries of MPs who do not pay the electricity bills of their official residences is mandatory. Finally an audit of money spent to keep the Rajapakshe family living in luxury with state houses, vehicles staff, and security has to be carried out. These costs have to either be garnished from their own wealth which will never be investigated or these privileges must be withdrawn.

  • 0
    0

    This essay sounds like it comes from Evil Fox’s stepdaughter. Sometimes, with his cunningness and other times as from a person lying on the bed in Angoda hospital. Her democratic honesty is this: Evil was completely rejected by Sinhala Buddhists Modayas. He has no seat in the parliament. Feeling ashamed because of his un-faceable defeat, he kept out of parliament even though other remaining UNPyers asked him to use the one seat allocated by the election commission to UNP. Then he and Old Rowdy had “after 1 O’clock “late night meetings, Old Rowdy declared that Evil had been rehabilitated and he is now an acceptable human being. “Royals only” Slap Party has 145 back washers for them. When protesters were chasing the Old Rowdy & Hitler out of the Presidential Palace, without shame Evil begged for the job of Old Rowdy and jumped to the top job from there. Hitler appointed him to the top job; Mr. 40% got the herd of Slap Party back washers to confirm Evil on the job. Now, according to the advocates of Evil Washers, Evil is the only honest democratic politician ever appeared in Langkang, because he brought the 22A and unsated Mr. 40% who had confirmed Evil at the top job. Hurray!

  • 0
    0

    Here we go, further:

    Starting a protest movement for “Holistic System Change” and stopping at having appointed Evil as the Emperor, who was chased out at the last election, is the good point to stop the protest. If the Modays not bending to the carrot, give them the cane; job is done! Modayas should not long to achieve all at one time, in other words, never seek redemption from the UNP-SLFP. Cyclical internment. Do not ask for an election now, that will be costing money which you may have to pocket out now, so wait for the opportunity until Evil can have corrupted the election laws that can ensure the UNP as ruling party for the rest of the Langkang history (as Junius Richard dreamed one time). Thissaranee Gunasekara’s most democratic politicians have brought 22A and unseated Mr.40%, so feel happy about that while mourning for he was defeated in the effort of bringing the Rehabilitation -Internment Camps act, one worse than the PTA. This kind of cunningness surpasses the usual Sinhala Intellectualism. Amazing- Unbelievable……… (Oh God have mercy on us)

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