28 October, 2020

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Reconciliation Is Not Happening In Sri Lanka

Reconciliation Is Not Happening In Sri Lanka, And The Problem Isn’t A Question Of Time

By Sivakami Rajamanoharan –

Dr. Sivakami Rajamanoharan

Three years since the armed conflict between the government of Sri Lanka and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) ended, the Tamil speaking areas remain gripped by repression, ethnic tension and widespread suffering, rather than emergent reconciliation and peace – and the problem is not a question of time.

The war itself ended in a cataclysm of violence in which, according to a UN expert panel’s report, over 40,000 Tamil civilians were massacred, largely by government shelling of safe zones and hospitals. The period after the war’s end in May 2009 saw the internment of hundreds of thousands of shell-shocked civilian survivors in squalid camps (run by Sri Lanka’s ethnically pure Sinhala military), from which reports of deprivation, abductions, torture and rape were persistently emerging. Although after intense international pressure the camps were eventually closed, large numbers of Tamils are still prevented from resettling.

It is against this recent history, quite apart from the decades of ethno-political strife and quarter century of war, that today, ‘reconciliation’ is being discussed as a necessary step towards a lasting peace. So it is unsurprising that the question of how to achieve reconciliation or, more importantly, what exactly it entails, has only become more contentious.

Whilst the Tamils, eminent human rights organisations and leading democracies have called for accountability for the horrific war crimes and crimes against humanity, alleged to have been committed by both sides, as the first step towards meaningful reconciliation, Sri Lanka dismisses such calls as ‘neo-colonialism’. Instead the Colombo government has tried to enforce its own brand of reconciliation – one that denies the military’s slaughter of large numbers of Tamil civilians, refuses to meaningfully address the Tamil people’s long-standing political grievances, and seeks to ruthlessly impose its own idea of what ‘national’ identity should be.

Sri Lanka’s understanding of reconciliation

Even a cursory look at resolved past conflicts and successful efforts at reconciliation underlines how mutual recognition, acceptance and tolerance of communities once seen as the enemy is fundamental. However, Sri Lanka’s vision of reconciliation is not constructed on this model. Instead, denying the very existence of an ethnic crisis on the island, Sri Lanka purports the problem to simply be one of ‘terrorism’. Within this framework, having now claimed victory over the LTTE, Sri Lanka asserts that given time and space reconciliation will naturally follow, and any voices of dissent are remnants of the original ‘problem’, that of ‘terrorism’.

In Sri Lanka, reconciliation between the Sinhalese and Tamils is seen as one of all people adopting a ‘Sri Lankan’ identity. In principle, this need not be problematic as an inclusive identity of equals fosters mutual tolerance and a celebration of differences. However, the inherent flaw – and, incidentally, the raison d’être for the Tamil people’s original call for autonomy soon after independence from Britain – is that the ‘Sri Lankan’ identity is essentially a Sinhala Buddhist one.

Whilst the government purports that Tamils, and those of the island’s minority communities, are welcome into and belong within an overarching ‘Sri Lankan’ identity, this welcome is in fact offered on the premise that a Sinhala Buddhist identity is adopted, feigned, or at the very least, its hegemony over the island is willingly accepted. That such an identity should be seen as the righteous and natural state of the island has long been enshrined within the country’s constitution and its numerous amendments, including the Sinhala Only Act and the state’s explicit duty to ‘protect and foster’ Buddhism, giving it the ‘foremost place’ on the island.

Thus enforced through parliament, the ideology of Sinhala Buddhist supremacy is exalted and effectively indoctrinated through the institutionalised Sinhala Buddhist text, the Mahavamsa. Taught to school children from an early age, the Mahavamsa’s claims of Sinhala Buddhism’s primordial ownership over the island is a theme that has run through the discriminatory and persecutory rhetoric of successive Sinhala governments fuelling the race riots, pogroms, persecution and genocide of the Tamils.

It is not only Sri Lanka’s refusal to accept the Tamil identity as a rightful and equal part of the island that discredits its claim of seeking ‘reconciliation’, but that any assertion of the legitimate, long-standing grievances of the Tamil people, or their desire for self-determination as a means to escape Sinhala Buddhist domination, is denounced as an inherent threat to the majority and vilified as ‘terrorist ideology’.  Even the dominant Tamil political coalition in the island, the Tamil National Alliance (TNA), despite its extensive democratic mandate within the Tamil areas as seen in the 2010 elections, has been accused by the government of propagating ‘extremism’, in calling for autonomy.

The only Tamils considered acceptable to the Sri Lankan government are those that accept Sinhala Buddhism’s dominance on the island – a state of perpetual submission and oppression that has never been accepted by the overwhelming majority.  Tamils who endorse accountability, greater autonomy, or self-determination are condemned as ‘war-mongering’, ‘radical’, ‘seeking revenge’ or as part of a Western ‘conspiracy’.

The Sri Lankan government’s delegation to the 19th session of the UN Humans Rights Council this month, illustrated the state’s façade of reconciliation. Whilst representatives of the TNA said they felt compelled to forego the event fearing reprisals on their return, the government’s delegation included an unelected Tamil mayor and a dubiously elected Tamil paramilitary leader (and now minister) who is indicted in the government’s own investigatory report into the final stages of the armed conflict.  This self-selected pool of ‘Sri Lankan Tamils’ is used to claim that ‘Sri Lankans’ have no appetite for accountability, and would under no circumstances accept international intervention to secure an independent process, viewing such measures as neo-colonialism. Yet once again, whilst this may resonate with ‘Sri Lankans’, for the Tamils this is far from the truth.

Since 2009, the Tamil people have consistently called for an independent, international investigation into the credible allegations of war crimes and crimes against humanity, as the only means of securing accountability. From the TNA, youth activists and civil society groups on the ground, to activists within the diaspora (criminalised by senior government ministers as the ‘LTTE rump’) there has been unanimous consensus. Sri Lanka cannot be left to investigate itself.

Fundamentally, crimes of such appalling gravity warrant an adequate investigation in and of themselves. Victims’ families and survivors have a right to justice. Knowing that those who perpetrate crimes will be held to account and that the rule of law holds (let alone questions of reparation or the sense of closure) are basic steps that allow a community, or nation, to take stock, grieve and renew. This is not a ‘Western’ concept of justice, or a ‘Western’ idea of morality, but a universal notion inherent to humanity. Looking forward, if Sri Lanka is serious about ceasing the relentless ethnic repression, there has to be meaningful accounting for the past.

Structural genocide

The government’s rhetoric about reconciliation thus belies a now relentless project to impose a Sinhala Buddhist identity throughout Tamil areas. Tamil place names are replaced with Sinhala ones; the national anthem is prohibited from being sung in Tamil, and Hindu and Christian places of worship remain destroyed across the Tamil areas, as Buddhist stupas are constructed. All the while, militarised repression seeks to stifle and violently stamp out any Tamil dissent and protest.

Whilst Tamils are prevented from resettling, the government is building militarised Sinhala settlements over their homes, to accommodate the increased deployment of the military, (almost exclusively Sinhala) to the North-East. At a time when the military should be scaled down, the government has announced increased military expenditure, and proposed grants for military personnel who extend their family by having a third child. Meanwhile, the government’s expropriation bill, changes to land registry and ownership, and dual citizenship amendments, disenfranchise and alienate the large swathes of Tamils who fled during the 80s and 90s – a diaspora that has and continues to be the backbone of the economic development and capital in the North-East.

Whilst proclaiming to potential investors and tour operators that ‘peace’ now prevails in Sri Lanka, the government has cracked down on press freedoms, increased political interference within the judiciary and imposed a militarised governance on Tamil areas, where aid agencies, foreign reporters and independent observers are unable to operate without close government supervision. In short, for the Tamils, the question is not one of reconciliation, but the absence of basic freedoms.

The effect of decades of pogroms and persecution of the Tamils – through the displacement, fleeing as refugees, seeking exile, disappearances and deaths – is that the very demographics of the island have now changed. The targeted, systematic massacre of the Vanni population, together with the subsequent arbitrary arrest and systematic rape of young Tamil men and women in the immediate aftermath, ensures that the full extent of demographic changes are yet to be seen. To the Tamils, the island’s changing demography is not an unfortunate after-effect, but an aim that spurred the structural genocide that continues to unfold.

Foundational crisis

It is an extensively documented, if often forgotten, fact that the Tamil demands for autonomy – in the form of federalism – first appeared as a direct result of the relentless ‘Sinhalisation’ of the then post-independence state of Ceylon. When these calls, supported by mass demonstrations through the sixties and seventies, were met with anger and state-backed rioting, Tamils united behind a call for an independent statehood. The call received overwhelming popular endorsement in the 1976 elections when the TNA’s predecessor, the TULF, swept the polls – a full six years before Tamil militants began an armed struggle.

It is this popular desire, shared by peoples in other parts of the world, such as in Scotland and Quebec, that is denounced by the Sri Lankan state and its majoritarian supporters as ‘terrorist ideology,’ ‘extremism’, ‘fascism’, and so on. Sri Lanka’s sixth amendment to the constitution enshrines in law the criminalisation of Tamil calls for independence. That the TNA has ‘moderated’ its stance to ask for autonomy, rather than independence, has made no difference.

Calls by the international community – including those like the US, India and European Union who supported Sri Lanka’s military campaign against the LTTE – for a political solution involving talks with the TNA and power-sharing with the Tamils have been met repeatedly by histrionic denunciations for supporting ‘separatism’ and ‘terrorism’.

The cynicism behind the rhetoric of reconciliation adopted by the government and its supporters is underlined by its evolving responses to accusation of mass atrocities by its armed forces – arguably the most serious charge citizens can level against the state. From the outset it reacted with unrestrained anger and indignation.

Beyond the government’s own predictable reaction to the atrocities, what is perhaps most striking is that this reaction is almost unanimously shared by the wider Sinhala polity, mainstream press, and especially, the majority of the Sinhalese people.

The well supported reports, including one from the UN Panel of Experts, of over 40,000 Tamils (supposedly fellow citizens) being killed, have been met with the same dismissal, outrage and indignation as that of the government. The government’s claims of ‘neo-colonial’ bullying are lauded, whilst the TNA, other Tamil critics, and the few Sinhala critics, are denounced as ‘traitors’ and threats to national security. In short, the government enjoys the unqualified support of the Sinhala majority on the issue of accountability for atrocities against Tamils.

Thus, even without the prevailing climate of militarised repression, replete with abductions, ‘disappearances’ and murders of critics, the wholesale rejection and criminalisation of the aspirations of an entire nation ensures that the frank and open dialogue required for reconciliation cannot take place in Sri Lanka.

Breaking the cycle

Today in Sri Lanka, in the name of reconciliation, an escalation of ethnic polarisation is unfolding, as the state strives to impose a Sinhala Buddhist hegemony over the Tamil areas.

The discrimination, persecution and genocide of the Tamil nation by the Sri Lankan state, supported and endorsed by the Sinhala majority, has been on-going for over seven decades – before, during and after the armed conflict. So too, has been Tamil resistance to this oppression.

Even after the end of the war, and in spite of state intimidation and militarised repression, the Tamils continue to support political parties and civil society groups, including resurging youth activism, that are torch-bearers for self-determination and independence. The TNA’s victory in last year’s polls is an irrefutable collective statement by the Tamil people that white-washing the past with promises of ‘development’ is no substitute for accountability, a meaningful addressing of legitimate grievances, and a just peace.

The events of the Arab Spring amply demonstrate that when people are faced with perpetual persecution by the state, their resistance is inevitable. When legitimate grievances and protests are met with violent state terror, then rebellion eventually follows. This is what happened thirty years ago in Sri Lanka, and it is a history poised to replay today. It is after all not merely past injustice that fuels the Tamil people’s demand for accountability and a lasting political solution, but that the grievances, which spurred resistance, are being added to day by day.

The Tamil call for an independent statehood stemmed from a very basic need for security against genocide. For many, and including the next generation of Tamil youth activists, the events of 2009 consolidated this need. The fact that the genocide continues to unfold today, only serves to vindicate it. The notion that today’s perpetrators can be relied upon to be tomorrow’s protectors is viewed with arguable cynicism and distrust, no more so than by the Tamil youth, looking to the future.

Sri Lanka’s rhetoric of ‘reconciliation’ and ensuing lasting peace could not be further from reality.

*Dr Sivakami Rajamanoharan is an activist within the Tamil Youth Organisation UK, campaigning for the rights of Eelam Tamils

This article originally appeared on openSecurity in the debate ‘Is reconciliation possible in Sri Lanka’. Calls for localism have been countered by calls to uphold global standards of human dignity and social justice in post-war Sri Lanka. The debate examines what reconciliation can mean for Sri Lankans in the aftermath of 2009, ending with a strong call to move beyond the local/international dichotomy.

Related posts;

Reconciliation In Sri Lanka Means The youth Must Lead The way

‘Reconciliation In Sri Lanka Means The Youth Must Lead The Way’: A Sceptical Response

‘What Sri Lanka Is…’: Acknowledging The Ethnic Conflict In Post-War Reconciliation

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    About Sivakami Rajamanoharan

    Dr Sivakami Rajamanoharan is an activist within the Tamil Youth Organisation UK, campaigning for the rights of Eelam Tamils.

    Articles by Sivakami Rajamanoharan

    Reconciliation is not happening in Sri Lanka, and the problem isn’t a question of time
    SIVAKAMI RAJAMANOHARAN , 12 March 2012
    The Tamil call for independent statehood stemmed from a very basic need for security against genocide. For many, including the next generation of Tamil youth activists, the events of 2009 consolidated this need.

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      THERE WAS NO GENOCIDE! Get a life, read the census reports, get a grasp of basic arithmetic. The numbers don’t add up and were nothing more than propaganda by the likes of Ms. Rajamanhoran to drum up support for Tamil Eelam (which she basically admits to supporting in her own article). Of course innocent Tamils died during the war. That is felt as a loss to the entire nation. The author resides overseas and has no grasp of the reality here, her reality is the rhetoric of a segment of the diaspora still asleep. Reestablishing a Buddhist presence after being erased by the LTTE is not a crime. Nobody is seeking to erase the identify of Tamils in the north. Genocide is what the LTTE did to its ‘own’ people in the north. How many Tamils live successful and productive lives as equal citizens in the rest of the country. It was the choice of many of these people to escape the clutches of the LTTE, and they were welcomed in the south- as evidenced by the lives they live today. There is nothing wrong with wishing the best for one’s kin in Sri Lanka and participating in a constructive way to improve their lot, but in the reality of Sri Lanka, there is no room for activists from the outside crating falsehoods and creating disharmony through falsehoods and raking up the distant past, which neither the current citizenry or the current government had anything to do with. My views have been formed by living in this country and following the news, not by race or religion. As there is a free press, the author is free to express her thoughts, and so am I.

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        Mah , dont say that there was no genocide in SL. There has been quite a few with the first one in 1958. Yes, the Tigers were no saints & were terrorists. The facts are that many innocent Tamils were killed during the war by the so called Government and now the Rajapakses (government ?) are continuing with the Tiger bogey to suppress the south. Honestly I see no difference between the Tigers & the Rajapakse regime–both are a bunch of terrorists.

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          ” the Tigers were no saints & were terrorists…..”

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        MAH

        is confident:

        “THERE WAS NO GENOCIDE!”

        Are you sure?

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    The Role Of The Military In The Post Conflict Era
    By Gotabaya Rajapaksa –

    Full text of the speech delivered by Secretary to the Ministry of Defence at Graduation Ceremony of the Bandaranaike Centre for International Studies (BCIS) on 21st August 2012 at BMICH, Colombo
    https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/the-role-of-the-military-in-the-post-conflict-era/

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    Complete Balderdash and Bunkum ….
    Propaganda without any control … Lies without any shame … Lord of rubbish ….
    Is it called ‘activitism’ in UK?

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    This is the typical LTTE activism. Wonder who is she trying to fool. Comparing Arab spring with LTTE terrorism is just ridiculous! More they lie and indulge in such false and meaningless propaganda, more they lose. And that’s what happened in May 2009. Liars and their supporters can never have a dignified life anywhere in the universe.

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      Who is good at lying?
      The External Affairs Minister G(Great) L(Lier) Peiris and even the
      the President himself have gone on record of lying to Ban Ki Moon and Indian leaders about solving the ethnic problem.

      Harping on LTTE acts of terrorism ad nauseum is not going to cover the war crimes committed.

      It is a fact that all governments after independence have discriminated
      the Tamil minority with various legislation such as Sinhala Only Act,
      Colonisation of Sinhalese in traditional Tamil areas (Eastern province)and changing the demography, Limiting entry to Universitis by merit with Standardisation of marks at exams, etc and security forces attacks on innocent Tamils State aided attacks on Tamils (like 1983 riots)– all these led to the formation of LTTE.
      Such atrocities are recorded by independent NGOs.

      Even after defeating LTTE with more than 20 powerul nations help
      the situation of Tamils in the North East has not improved.
      The military with more than 99% Sinhala (which should have been reduced at the end of war) is grabing land that belongs to the Tamils who were displaced for more camps and residence for their familis
      The diplaced Tamils are prevented from earning their livlyhood.

      When will peace come to this island???

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        Peter, well said. I am not going to say much but in july,1983 I witness with my own eyes during the riots how innocent Tamils trying to escape in their car in Colombo and the outskirts were pulled out and set on fire by the sinhalese tugs a shame, and the Army who was called out and Marshall law declared by the then Jaywardene government did nothing to stop this atrocities. This to me is crime against humanity. Ever since then the Tamils have suffered and deprived the right to live in the Island of Sri Lanka since the bloody Bandaranaikes changed the whole concept Politically to coexist which carried on by the sinhalese Politicians and brainwashed the Sinhalese people. The Sinhalese people has to understand why the Tamils went to war since they were fighting for the right to coexist which they have done over the centries. As a sinhalese I am ashame of my race because there was no need to fight, and wars do create famine,genocide and havoc. Now the civil war has ended all the people must forget this hate and try to put aside this bad feeling, and reach some understanding to live in harmony for the betterment of the Country. Forget the past and think of the future of our children which must be done by people-power not the Politicians who are there to look after themselves and get rich.

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    Even we dont agree with what Dr Rajamanoharan says,we have a problum (agreed or not),we better resolve it as soon as possible within ourselves, if not it will be forced into us by another world power like South Sudan or East Timor

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    Sivakami is perhaps right. Sri Lankan identity is synonymous with sinhala- buddhist identity. May be a euphemism.

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    Instead of heaping abuse on the writer readers should write in the basis of their disagreements. Atrocious crimes were committed on both
    sides during the “war” and innocent Tamils and Sinhalese lost their lives. It is in everyone’s interest to look more to forge a workable
    future for all. One major obstacle to be removed will be if and when the North is allowed to chose their own Provincial Council. Why is this delayed when the entire world wants this basic right conceded?

    Senguttuvan

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      Dear Senguttuan,

      I quote from somewhere in the net regarding LTTE RUMP propaganda ..
      “The accusations keep getting more and more absurd. It’s surely just a mater of a few more lengths of rope until the accusers hang themselves in their delirium.”

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      Why is it then the TNA reject the 13A?

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        NAK

        has exclusive right to information:

        “Why is it then the TNA reject the 13A?”

        Do you know what is in 13A?

        Please let us know.

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    I ENTIRELY AGREE WITH SENGUTTUVAN’S RESPONSE. IT IS HIGH TIME WE SRILANKANS, WHETHER WE ARE SINHALESE, TAMILS, MUSLIMS, MALAYS OR BURGHERS, ALONG WITH THE CLERGIES OF ALL RELIGION IN THIS ISLAND PARADISE OF OURS, SHOULD UNITE AND STAND TOGETHER TO BRING PEACE AND HARMONY WITHIN OUR RACES AND RELIGIONS. WE SHOULD ALL SHOW THE WORLD THAT WE ARE A PEACE LOVING NATION.

    ON THE OTHER HAND, WE SHOULD ALL UNITEDLY TAKE STERN ACTION TO PUNISH PEOPLE WHO DO NOT WISH TO TOE THE LINE WITH THE PEACE LOVING PEOPLE, AND TEND TO BRING DISHARMONY.

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      The present political culture should be changed for a peaceful Sri Lanka.

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      Keep the clegy out- it’s an alergy.

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      De-Silva I comment you are a person quite right,
      and I wish there is many who think this way we have to live in peace and
      harmony within our races and religions.What you have said cover everything and I shall not say much.

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    People in Sri Lanka identify themselves as Sinhalese, Tamil and Muslim etc; it’s only when they go outside Sri Lanka that they identify themselves as Sri Lankan. There’s no Sri Lankan national consciousness, what exists among the people is conflicting Sinhalese nationalist consciousness and Tamil nationalist conciousness within the State of Sri Lanka, the former as State Nationalism and the latter as nationalism of the people excluded from the State. There cannot be a synthesis between these opposing nationalisms.

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      cyril

      is proud or not so proud:

      “it’s only when they go outside Sri Lanka that they identify themselves as Sri Lankan”.

      They are commonly known as Pakis.

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    She is a mouth peace of Tamil terrorist.
    While having luxury & lavish life in UK she is just shedding crocodile tears for Tamils in Srilanka. We must banned & blacklist this women entering Srilanka. She still try to live in day dream of Tamil Ellam.
    May be heart broken as they couldn’t get separate country after toiling & spending their money for Tamil terrorist.
    Let her live & die in UK. One point we as srilankans must reconcile & be fair for real Srilankan Tamils. We must render our support & corporation for fruitful & meaningful life for Tamils in Srilanka. We all suffered, hence let’s build our country together.

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    By the mere fact the author of this article in an Eelam activist, not much of the content can be take seriously. It is true the citizen of this country must come together as one family, but by continuing to quote false figures from unconfirmed sources and trying to hide the lie behind a so called ‘UN expert panel’ which the UN itself has distanced itself from smacks of biased agendas masked behind reporting!

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      As one family? You are stupid. Sri Lanka belongs to the Sinhalese! We won’t hesitate to rape or murder anyone in our way.

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    Reconciliation is not happening in the eyes of some, but it is indeed taken place everyday. Where is the end point of reconciliation? When the disingenuous TNA cadre or diaspora get their Eelam, or when agitators stop condemning and start promoting a sense of unity. These kinds of people have no end game that considered the nation as a whole, only the same old day dream of Eelam. Don’t get left behind, the country and its people are moving forward.

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    For the real reconciliation not only sri lanksn govenment , these type of LTTE activist stop writing crap and creating more gap between tamils and sinhales , these sort of crapy writers should stop dreaming about seprate contry, living in UK and keep putting their relatives into mythical dream

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    This writer has never been to Sri Lanka since the end of the war. Her father’s Tiger influence is all over her writing. Dear Dr Sivakami for god sake go to your dad’s birth place Suthumali and see how peacefully the Amman Temple exists with its devotees. Out of touch and full of LTTE influence in you writing clearly say one think! Your are biased with your dad’s favorite brother Prabaharan’s ideology. If you really care about Tamils in Sri Lanka, please pay a visit to Vanni and help the people who really need help than your writing.

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    Sri Lanka cannot achieve reconcilliation because Sri Lanka is full of jokers with self interest. Sri Lankan politicians like Karu Jayasuriya who wants the government to close the army camps in the north and the east are jokers. Sajith is the son of R. Premadasa who gave arms to the Tigers is another comedian. Then comes the White Flag Fonseka who is another comedian. Then comes the latest joker former judge Warawewa, who wants to save Sri Lanka from the Rajapakses. Then Mangala Samaraweera anothet comedian,who wants Gota the architect of the war victory over the Tigers to resign because Gota told off the female funny lady Frederica Janz where to get off. Sri Lanka beats the world in Joker politicians. Get rid of these jokers and then Sri Lanka can achieve peace when the jokers leave the political arena.

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      So what is your opinion on rulers who seems to be silent even if deterioration of society has reached to the level of appalling states as Ivan pointed out lately ? Are they all according to you – non-jokers ? As every sane would feel, ruling regime is the worst sofar..

      Btw, Defeat of Ltters ONLY WITHIN LANKEN TERRIRORIES was not because of MR s magical powers but because all other factors together incl. break down of LTTE internationaly and their inner crisis. If MR was that magical, he could have done lot more for the betterment of the nation even earlier.

      If the Magical MR´s efforts was the core reason to defeat terror, why is that the governance under him seem to fail all other crucial issues like university problem, standing against crime and others today ?

      Why is that over 40 or more of the current cabinet MPs and ministers are reported to have connected to all kind of abuses as some radio senders reveal (illegal business, drug trafficking and even running sex industry)

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUX_BO_HsLg

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tx2CGXhHfCs

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnYvgGV2bqA

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqr5D2vDiio

      This kind of senders reveal the real pains of the nation, but ones like you who remained brainwashed, not only the current regime but also you people are accountable for what the country faces today.

      Further, not to forget, Roads and other developments were started in the previous govt. And Ban of LTTEers internationlly and purchase of heavy weapons were also finalized by the previous regime. More of the truth you please study first before coming to add low grade of comments to this thread.

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    An appeal is in order to the young people in the diaspora like the writer(assumed young) to veer away from the diabolical lies propagated by the LTTE to secure crediblity and sympathy to their cause in Western countries. It has already been observed that educated Tamil parents who secured residence in these countries have let their children think independently devoid of compouded prejudices, teaching them the values of Tamil identity and their affinity to their parent’s home land Sri Lanka. With the hand on heart can this writer claim not be a second class citizen in the land of her domicile. It shoud not be forgotten that it is only in Sri Lanka that she would feel a first class citizen whatever official citizenship she holds.

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      @Chandra
      Ha…haa…you say of Dr.Sivakami Rajamanoharan, “It shoud not be forgotten that it is only in Sri Lanka that she would feel a first class citizen whatever official citizenship she holds.”
      Whom are you trying to fool? As a minority Tamil, could Dr.Rajamanoharan or her children ever be able to become president of Sri Lanka? Is it remotely possible for a non Sinhala Buddhist to become the leader of this country? :)

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    This Article mistakenly posted on CT,should have been posted on Tamil net! Sme ols LTTE crap.

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      NAK:

      “This Article mistakenly posted on CT,should have been posted on Tamil net! Sme ols LTTE crap.”

      Could you tell us why this article is “Sme ols LTTE crap”.

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    For those of you who want to believe that no Tamil civilians were deliberately targeted and killed by the armed forces, please read “The Cage” by Gordon Weiss…also go to YouTube and watch channel 4s “Sri Lanka’s Killing Fields.”

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    Oh ! listen to her. Look at her credentials She is a (Dr)& knows it all.

    Eelam Dream was lost when Velu & drunken (Dr.?) Bala pulled out of peace talks.
    Velu did not want it. Now U dispora move on.

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      dicky Bird

      is sad:

      “Eelam Dream was lost when Velu & drunken (Dr.?) Bala pulled out of peace talks.”

      The Tamil Eelam project was dead on arrival in 1976. Why did it take so long for you to acknowledge the demise of Eelam dream?

      You must be very stupid indeed. Are you a stupid Tamil? On the other hand you must be a stupid Sinhalese.

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