23 September, 2019

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Sri Lanka’s HR Successes Make Megre Reading

Successes of the Sri Lankan government in addressing human rights violations make megre reading as Presidential secretary Lalith Weeratunge  made a presentation to Geneva based diplomats on Sri Lanka’s progress on issues raised by the international community.

LLRC_Brief_p2Addressing a gathering in Geneva on 21, January Weeratunge cited Army Courts of Inquiry into allegations of civilian casualties and the summary execution of captured persons as evidence of addressing serious concerns regarding the conduct of the military.

As of information available in the public domain the Army has found itself absolved of any wrong doing.

Meanwhile elaborating further Weeratunge boasted that a “Non summary investigation” has commenced in September 2013 in to the killing of five students in Trincomalee in January 2006. Weeratunge says that since September 2013, fourteen persons have given evidence to the inquiry and that the next siting is scheduled for March 2014.

It is interesting to note that the Sri Lanka Human Rights Commission, at that time enjoying a semblance of independence, in 2006 tasked a three person Commission to look into the same issue. The Commission concluded its findings in three months after carrying out a thorough investigation and submitted the report to the HRC in April of 2006, a mere four months since the tragic incident. The report which was not originally published by the HRC but eventually placed in the public domain by the Colombo Telegraph categorically found that the security forces personnel were responsible for the brutal slaying of the five students.

With regard to the killing of 17 aid workers in Muttur,  Weeratunge claims that a “Team of prosecutors are reviewing material and the CID conducting further investigations.” The incident took place nearly six years ago in August 2008.

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Latest comments

  • 3
    0

    MUTTUR
    The truth about the assassination of
    17 aid workers in Sri Lanka

    Click link to read PDF
    http://f.cl.ly/items/2b2J0q3y1F2C2X1i2L1O/EXE%2520BDEF_RAPPORT_SRI%2520LANKA_DEC%252013.pdf

    http://www.hrw.org/news/2010/05/20/sri-lanka-new-evidence-wartime-abuses

    A LEGACY TO REMEMBER;
    SRI LANKA’S COMMISSIONS OF INQUIRY
    LAW & SOCIETY TRUST
    SEPTEMBER 2010
    Edited by Kishali Pinto-Jayawardena
    1963 – 2002
    A Reference Guide to Commission Reports
    with a Tabulated List of Recommendatons

    http://www.lawandsocietytrust.org/PDF/a%20legacy%20to%20remember%3B%20sri%20lanka's%20commissions%20of%20inquiry.pdf

  • 8
    0

    The army has inquired into their crimes and have absolved themselves of any crime.
    Re. the killing of the 6 students another non summary investigation is being held.
    Re. the killing of the 17 aid workers a team of prosecutors are reviewing the material. All being done in secret. What more do you want?
    What a joke. Lalith Weeratunge must be having an excellent sense of humour. Bensen

  • 7
    0

    Human rights is surrounding by military in Sri Lanka
    I am not just saying look at the picture

  • 7
    1

    Damn stupid bunch of liars, cheaters, murderers, war criminals and genocidaires the ruling junta members of Rajapakse regime are.

    Stupid murderous idiots think the international community is full of gullible fools to believe them!

  • 3
    0

    Can Radhika Cumarasamy enlighten Lalith on what the Commission she chaired found on these issues.

    Hopefully she has had the time and the interest to read through the document by now, particularly after the scandalous exposure in this Blog space just a week or so ago.

  • 0
    0

    Lalith Weeratunge has superceded all others as the Whitewasher in Chief of the Rajapakse Regime – while being a public servant (and faithful servant of the president) – and has miserably failed at his job.

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