16 May, 2021

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The Right To Noisy Protest

By Jayampathy Wickramaratne

Dr Jayampathy Wickramaratne PC

‘Stifling the peaceful expression of legitimate dissent today can only result, inexorably, in the catastrophic explosion of violence some other day.’ Justice Mark Fernando in Amaratunga vs Sirimal.

The recent arrest of a young man who called upon fellow motorists to sound their horns in protest at the sudden interruption of traffic in Colombo to facilitate a “VIP movement” has led to a discussion on the right to protest by making noise.

The video recording of the incident has gone viral. As was later found, the “VIP movement” concerned was the motorcade of the visiting Chinese Defence Minister. The Police had not announced in advance that the road would be closed. While people resent road closures to facilitate movements of local VIPs, hardly anyone would object if it was known that the VIP was a visiting senior Minister of a friendly country, whether it be China, India or other. President Gotabaya Rajapaksa has set an example by moving around almost unnoticed with only a few vehicles in convoy. In May 2019, when a video showing motorists honking loudly in protest when a road was blocked to facilitate a VIP movement went viral, President Sirisena ordered an end to such road closures. On that occasion, Mr. Mahinda Rajapaksa said that “the displeasure shown by the public against the closure of roads for VIP vehicular movements by unceasingly sounding the horn were a reaction to the Government’s policies”.

Watching last week’s video, it is clear that the young man thought that it was a local VIP who was being conducted—it would not have made a difference to his right to protest even if it was otherwise. He only called upon others to sound their horns in protest; he did not instigate violence. According to media reports, Police claim that he obstructed the Police in performing their duties. The recording belies that claim. He is even accused of instigating an “unlawful assembly”! That the young man expressed his regret for what he did after being released on bail is immaterial.

The right to protest peacefully is so central to a functioning democracy. It is a right that may be exercised individually or collectively. It is in authoritarian states that the right to protest is not tolerated. A democratic state has a positive obligation to protect the right of peaceful protestors.

Last December, in the matter of the farmers’ protest blocking the roads in Central Delhi, Chief Justice Bobde stated: “We clarify that this court will not interfere with the protest in question. Indeed, the right to protest is part of a fundamental right and can as a matter of fact, be exercised subject to public order. There can certainly be no impediment in the exercise of such rights as long as it is non-violent and does not result in damage to the life and properties of other citizens. … We are of the view at this stage that the farmers’ protest should be allowed to continue without impediment and without any breach of peace either by the protesters or the police”.

The incident also brought to focus an important judgment of our Supreme Court, Amaratunga vs Sirimal, reported at [1993] 1 Sri Lanka Law Reports 264. Ironically, the case related to a protest called “Janagosha”, the main organizer of which was Mahinda Rajapaksa, the present Prime Minister. Pictures of Rajapakse blowing a horn during the protest were widely circulated via social media after last week’s incident. Janagosha was a 15-minute peaceful protest conducted on 01 July 1992, organized by several Opposition parties, including the SLFP, during the Premadasa era. The protest was to show disapproval of the policies and actions of the Government on a range of issues such as the unbearable increase in the cost of living, the privatization of public enterprises and the consequent retrenchment, wasteful expenditure on political extravaganzas, corruption, the suppression of discussion on certain matters of public interest, escalating abductions and killings, and the North-East War. According to the judgment of the Supreme Court, delivered by Justice Mark Fernando, “prospective participants were asked to orchestrate their efforts in a noisy cacophony of protest—the ringing of temple and church bells, the tooting of motor vehicle horns, the beating of drums, the banging of saucepans, and the like—so that there might resound, throughout the nation, a deafening din of disapproval.”

Petitioner Amaratunga was a member of the Horana Praddeshiya Sabha. His complaint was that two Police officers had destroyed and silenced his drum, which he used at the Janagosha. The first respondent officer had used a “molgaha” —a rice pounder—to destroy the drum. Justice Fernando was satisfied that the Police acted simply because anti-Government slogans were being shouted. The learned Judge stated that there was ample authority that “speech and expression” guaranteed by Article 19 (1) (a) of our Constitution extended to forms of expression other than oral or verbal—placards, picketing, the wearing of black armbands, the burning of draft cards, the display of any flag, badge, banner or device, the wearing of a jacket bearing a statement etc. The right to support or to criticize Governments and political parties, policies and programmes, is fundamental to the democratic way of life, and the freedom of speech and expression is one which cannot be denied without violating those fundamental principles of liberty and justice which lie at the base of all civil and political institutions, Justice Fernando stated.

A European case involving the use of sound to protest was Hashman and Harrup vs The United Kingdom, where proceedings had been brought against the applicants, hunt-saboteurs on their own admission, who disrupted a fox hunt by blowing a hunting horn and shouting. They were each bound over by a Magistrate in a sum of £100 not to breach the peace and to be of good behaviour for twelve months. The European Court of Human Rights held that while the protest took the form of impeding activities which the applicants disapproved, nonetheless, it constituted an expression of opinion within the meaning of Article 10 of the European Convention. The measures taken against the applicants were, therefore, an interference with their right to freedom of expression.

Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan vs Union of India was a batch of cases against decisions of the National Green Tribunal (NGT) which concerned the right to protest near the iconic Jantar Mantar in Central Delhi, a popular place of protest.  The NGT had prohibited all protests, agitations, assembling of people, public speeches, using of loudspeakers etc near Jantar Mantar. Residents of the area had complained that their right of movement had been restricted and that they had been greatly inconvenienced by the sound emanating from the protests. The NGT had issued directions that included the shifting of protestors, agitators and people holding dharnas to an alternative site in Delhi.

The Indian Supreme Court observed that undoubtedly, the right of people to hold peaceful protests and demonstrations etc is a fundamental right. The question was whether disturbances etc caused to residents is a larger public interest which outweighs the rights of protestors to hold demonstrations and, therefore, amounts to reasonable restriction in curbing such demonstrations. While the demonstrations had caused serious discomfort and harassment to the residents, it is also to be kept in mind that for quite some time Jantar Mantar had been chosen as a place for holding demonstrations and was earmarked by the authorities as well. Primacy cannot be given to one right whereby the right of the other gets totally extinguished. Total extinction is not balancing. Balancing would mean curtailing a right of one class to some extent so that the right of the other class is also protected. Justice Sikri directed the Commissioner of Police, New Delhi to devise, in consultation with other concerned agencies, a proper mechanism for the limited use of the area for protests, demonstrations etc but to ensure that they are regulated in such a manner that they do not cause any disturbance to the residents of Jantar Mantar Road or the offices situated there. Detailed guidelines in this respect should be formulated.

The Police should not be over-zealous in dealing with peaceful protests. The state must not only tolerate peaceful protests but also safeguard the right of citizens to protest. There are enough and more examples from all over the world on what befell governments that did not tolerate dissent. As Justice Mark Fernando warned in Amaratunga vs Sirimal, “stifling the peaceful expression of legitimate dissent today can only result, inexorably, in the catastrophic explosion of violence some other day.”

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  • 32
    0

    The Author gives examples where justice was rendered in a democratic society where the legislature the executive and the judiciary functioned independently. That ladder was used by some to attain an autocracy, even though they themselves used free expression in those better days as per examples of MR’s actions quoted.
    But the icing in the cake is when the Magistrate says: “This is not Australia” – implying may be, that Oz has free expression but not here.

    • 23
      1

      The kind of horn protests are allowed to Rajapakshes only. Pinguththarayas are dead silent today for some hidden reasons. I really dont know if our sinhalayas are the human creatures – there I have a greater question…
      :
      There is a saying in vernacular sinhala -කන්න ඕන උනාම කබරගොයාත් තලගොයා කරගනන්ව… they can turn monitors kabaragoya to bengal monitors.
      (in British English
      (kəˌbɑːrəˈɡəʊjə)
      NOUN
      a very large monitor lizard, Varanus salvator, of SE Asia: it grows to a length of three metres
      Also called: Malayan monitor)

      Law and order is not valid to Rajapakshes – stupid people would adulate them for ever going by all the BLATANT lies on and on…
      .
      GMO companies over to you, need of the hours is to MODIFY sinhala genes for a better nation.

    • 6
      0

      MV
      Argentinian mothers, I guess, pioneered noisy protest by banging cooking utensils, under not commendable democratic conditions.
      What matters is not protest in itself but purpose and follow up..

      • 5
        0

        ….What matters is not protest in itself but purpose and follow up……
        Yes true, not only Re. “protests” but in almost everything on does – there should be meaning and purpose. Even in the comments here on CT !!

        • 0
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          MV
          Thanks for the improvement.

  • 37
    3

    I hear soon Chinese Finance minister Ding Dong will be visiting us to check out their recently acquired assets and potential for more purchasing of debt ridden asset. Find out route map to avoid inconvenience.

    • 3
      4

      @chiv
      Racist and liked by people, where else other than Sri Lanka does this happens too often

      • 4
        0

        Yasiru, never saw your name in CT. It’s okay because people do have ability to show up as and when they want, but to call Lanka as racist country ???. Over to Evil, N.Perera Soman,Regie ———–

    • 4
      0

      I dont think it would not be any surprise, double-pakshes would appoint a chinese as the minister of finance to the rest of their term. People are made permanent mercy cows. Their 2/3 mandate and 20A would help them to even appoint Ukranian women to srilanken parliament….. .. folks, it is too late… harakiri occured with the reelection of Double pakshe in the PE.

  • 17
    0

    “stifling the peaceful expression of legitimate dissent today can only result, inexorably, in the catastrophic explosion of violence some other day.”

    Maybe the militarisation of public institutions can help quell mass protests or “catastrophic explosion” of violence, together with a new constitution that removes certain rights?

    • 2
      22

      WRONG.
      ‘Noisy’ protests or cheering cannot be allowed.
      Inconvenience to the public must be taken into account.
      What about sleeping babies , sick and the old in neighborhring houses and workers in roadside offices?
      Permissible Decibel level must be legally defined.
      It is time Sri Lanka brought in legislation to curb noise polution which is alreadyady at an unbearable level.
      Loudspeaker on top of the Mosque and Temple without prior permission for special occasions must be outlawed.
      Music in travelling busses must be banned.
      Your right to democracy ends at my right to peace of mind.

      Soma

      • 19
        2

        Somooooooo, so the gamarala Banda from Hambantota when he was doing it, it was ok? But now it has become illegal because of decibels? Hahahaha what a joker Somooooooooooo you are.

      • 17
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        Somooooo when are you going to make it illegal for Buddhist thug monks from assaulting civilians? These lungi wearing pricks must me exterminated like rabid dogs on the streets.

        • 0
          9

          Tamil f
          “These lungi wearing pricks must me exterminated like rabid dogs on the streets.”
          Reminiscing of your old days as an active member of Sun God’s special brigade tasked for that job?
          Reminds me of your spoils like Aranthalava.

          Soma

        • 0
          4

          What is your purpose? You claim Sinhalese are racist while calling monks “lungi wearing pricks”. Being racist in a website full of racist is like a fish swimming in the water. Stop being racist yourself first if you want anything.

          • 1
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            Yasiru –
            I am not a racist but cannot stand ones who are racists. These Buddhist clergy don’t know a thing about Buddhism. This country’s politicians use these safron clad rowdies to promote racism and hatred in this country.

      • 11
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        Soma, Could you stop making noise, please!

        • 6
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          Nathan, yes Somooooo’s noise has increased the level of decibels. Now Somoooooo has become a science teacher.

        • 0
          5

          Nathan
          You got the point.
          “Noise” you cannot avoid getting exposed to – like terrorism.

          Soma

      • 5
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        soman

        Is Mahinda blowing his own trumpet?
        Isn’t it your job?

      • 0
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        Soma
        What about Mahinda Rajapakse himself involving in a noisy protest as the photo shows. So he too can be arrested.

  • 1
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.

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  • 24
    7

    Dr Jayampathy Wickramaratne PC,

    DId you hear about the peaceful priest by Tamil Politicians in Galle Face Green 60 odd years ago?

    They were beaten up by Sinhalese thugs and no action was taken against the thugs.

    A few years later peaceful satyagraha protest By Tamil public in front of Jaffna Kachcheri was violently broken up by the police.

    So many peaceful protests by Tamils met with similar violence by the state forces and others.

    Now when Sinhalese protest meets disapproval you jump up and protest.

    What a hypocrite are you?

    • 15
      4

      Thiru

      “Now when Sinhalese protest meets disapproval you jump up and protest.
      What a hypocrite are you?”

      How old do you think Dr Jayampathy Wickramaratne PC was when the peaceful protest by Tamil Politicians in Galle Face Green took place 60 odd years ago?
      Are you raising this question in anger or sheer stupidity?

      • 0
        5

        NV, Thiru
        “Noise” affects those who like quiet and peace of mind too.
        As for “sight” you can turn your eyes away but for “noise” you are helpless.
        All over the page I can see the terrorist mentality of harrasing third party civilians coming to the fore.

        Soma

    • 19
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      I completely agree that a peaceful protest was broken up by thugs while the Police looked on. The Left parties strongly condemned that attack. (That the Left changed its position on the language issue later is something I have criticised publicly.)

      • 0
        4

        Dr.Jayampathy Wickramaratne
        .
        “Noise” affects those who like quiet and peace of mind too.
        As for “sight” you can turn your eyes away but for “noise” you are helpless.
        The recipient has no “choice” in this form of Democratic message delivery, you may kindly acknowledge.
        All over the page I can see the terrorist mentality of harrasing third party civilians coming to the fore.

        Soma

  • 17
    4

    The Rajapaksa group is now afraid to see or hear or smell everything and every one like (but really) a criminal or robber or murderer. Until now young boy, a muslim or a Tamil. burqa, Quran, photo of Prabha, Lord Siva statue but now even a yellow rope Monk, white dressed priest are considered as a threat to Rajapaksas.

    • 19
      3

      Uneasy lies the head that wears the crown. We are experiencing the downfall of our nation, and the eroding of our laws and norms. This is what happens in autocratic nations, which is the way we are heading unfortunately.

      • 4
        1

        Entire world vis watching. Nothing worst can happen to the nation as of today. Bps did nt handle it with the granted vaccines how they would complete the 2 and dose. That alone proves their capabilities, mlechcha idiots talk high but govern like 2nd grade pupils. No statistics about how the government injected the first dose, to whom etc. No transparency at all with 3 wiyathmaga criminals keeping as their ministers. That Rajarata ballige putha fake Prof shoud be hung by their balls as of today all expatriates are against Rajapakshe criminals friendly tactics 😌😌😌😌😌😌

      • 2
        0

        Entire world vis watching. Nothing worst can happen to the nation as of today. Bps did nt handle it with the granted vaccines how they would complete the 2 and dose. That alone proves their capabilities, mlechcha idiots talk high but govern like 2nd grade pupils. No statistics about how the government injected the first dose, to whom etc. No transparency at all with 3 wiyathmaga criminals keeping as their ministers. That Rajarata ballige putha fake Prof shoud be hung by their balls as of today all expatriates are against Rajapakshe criminals friendly tactics 😌😌😌😌😌😌😎😎

  • 17
    4

    In this holly land chosen by buddha the pain and suffering and awakening come only when chosen sinhala buddhists feel the pain. Tamils are killed in thousands from 1956 by Sinhala patriots but that is not an issue. But now the patriots too are begining to feel the pain in the hands of sinhala buddhist hero and thus it is an issue. Is it really worth talking about SL and peaceful protests when there is no regime at all but a family of crooks. Gotta went in person to airport to receive vaccine from China and that is what left in SL. Mahibtha the megalomaniac went to UN to protest for JVP and also blew his trumpet as protest and now arresting sinhalayas too. Judiciary and legal system wiped out. Why do we have courts? So what tamils asked for foteign judges is totally justified SL is a big joke fell into its own bias, racism and stupidity.

    • 0
      7

      @BL
      Are Tamils still killed?. Do you even live in Sri lanka?. Come out of your 1956 mentality first.

  • 13
    3

    Dear Native Vedda,

    Before you jump to conclusions of anger or stupidity, think about all the violent responses received by peaceful protests of Tamils since the 1950s down to today. Even today relatives of thousands of “made to disappear” Tamils protesting peacefully is met with constant harassment by the secret security agents of the state.

    I don’t know how old you are or Jayampthy is, but one must look at the historical development in Sri Lanka since independence of how protests are responded to by the state and its agents.

    One cannot pluck one recent example of protest and go to town with it – that is hypocrisy. A PC, I would expect to know about how the rule of law has deteriorated in Sri Lanka since independence.

    It didn’t happen overnight!

  • 7
    3

    Interesting read.

    “Unlike traditional dictators, today’s would-be autocrats typically emerge from democratic settings. Most pursue a two-step strategy for undermining democracy: first, scapegoat and demonize vulnerable minorities to build popular support; then, weaken the checks and balances on government power needed to preserve human rights and the rule of law, such as an independent judiciary, a free media, and vigorous civic groups. Even the world’s established democracies have shown themselves vulnerable to this demagoguery and manipulation.

    Autocratic leaders rarely solve the problems that they cite to justify their rise to power, but they do create their own legacy of abuse. At home, the unaccountable government that they lead becomes prone to repression, corruption, and mismanagement. Some claim that autocrats are better at getting things done, but as they prioritize perpetuating their own power, the human cost can be enormous, such as the hyperinflation and economic devastation in once oil-rich Venezuela, the spree of extrajudicial killings as part of the “drug war” in the Philippines, or China’s mass detention of upwards of 1 million Turkic Muslims, primarily Uyghurs.

    Read this Human Rights Watch Report

    https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2019/country-chapters/global

    • 5
      4

      This is not a new phenomenon.
      There were several forerunners to dictators who attained power through the ballot box.
      Fascist populists used the ballot to come to power in Italy and Germany.
      We cannot forget Marcos.

      • 1
        1

        SJ
        You have to wait until next election date as per the Constitution.

        Soma

        • 4
          0

          soman

          “You have to wait until next election date as per the Constitution.”

          Even for a FASCIST Gota/Nanthu is utterly incompetent.
          Is he running the trains on time?

  • 8
    2

    Thiru.

    Had you known Dr.Jayampathy W. popularly known to his friends as Pol Wicka you would not have called him a Hypocrite.
    He was in the forefront in drafting a New Constitution, but alas before it could be presented there was a regime change.
    Pray, Thiru how could we hold him responsible for all the woes of the Tamils in this country!

  • 6
    3

    Thiru

    “A PC, I would expect to know about how the rule of law has deteriorated in Sri Lanka since independence.”

    That would take at least a few PhD thesis.
    Do you expect everyone who wants to discuss about violence against protest to spend every morning writing a PhD thesis on violence against Tamils and then deal with contemporary violence against peaceful protest?

    If you are genuinely concerned about violence on Tamils including their peaceful protests why don’t you publish your PhD thesis here in Colombo Telegraph. By now I hope you would have written at least 15 thesis. Where are they? Send it to Colombo Telegraph and then demand Dr Jayampathy Wickramaratne PC to incorporate your points, evidences, conclusions in his article.

    I think you have plenty of idle time in your hands. Why don’t you watch this documentary, think about it then tell us if you see any parallels or how you feel:
    Searching for the Standing Boy of Nagasaki
    https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/ondemand/video/5001311/#:~:text=A%20young%20boy%20carries%20on,stoically%20near%20a%20cremation%20pit

  • 9
    2

    Mahinda Rajapakse generated many human rights cases. One was the Jana Gosha case mentioned here. Another was his effort to got the the much maligned UNHRC in Geneva to speak about the JVP youth. Now his government and its forces are the chief violators of human rights. The right to associate and express views is fundamental. In our legal systems they have to be protected. We are not China yet and will refuse to become China. The Rajapaksas are a passing facet in our history. Human rights and democracy are here to stay. They have seen off other wannabe tyrants before like JRJ,Mrs B and Chandrika.

    • 9
      3

      WE may refuse to become China, but the Rajapaksa’s have already handed this country over to China on a golden platter, and when China says “jump” the Rajapaksas will ask them “how high”? Once China place’s it’s large foot here, there is no turning back.

  • 0
    8

    WRONG.
    ‘Noisy’ protests or cheering cannot be allowed.
    Inconvenience to the public must be taken into account.
    What about sleeping babies , sick and the old in neighborhring houses and workers in roadside offices?
    Permissible Decibel level must be legally defined.
    It is time Sri Lanka brought in legislation to curb noise polution which is alreadyady at an unbearable level.
    Loudspeaker on top of the Mosque and Temple without prior permission for special occasions must be outlawed.
    Music in travelling busses must be banned.
    Your right to democracy ends at my right to peace of mind.

    Soma

    • 5
      1

      soman

      It is always good to hear from you.
      Fascists or those who are blessed with Fascist tendencies are very interesting bigots.

      The Albert Einstein Institution provides a list of 198 Methods of Nonviolent Actions.

      Read this:
      From Dictatorship to Democracy A Conceptual Framework for Liberation
      http://www.cfic.org.uk/media/From%20dictatorship%20to%20democracy.pdf

      Also read
      Martin Niemöller poem, who had first hand experience in Germany:

      First they came for the Communists
      And I did not speak out
      Because I was not a Communist
      Then they came for the Socialists
      And I did not speak out
      Because I was not a Socialist
      Then they came for the trade unionists
      And I did not speak out
      Because I was not a trade unionist
      Then they came for the Jews
      And I did not speak out
      Because I was not a Jew
      Then they came for me
      And there was no one left
      To speak out for me.

      Therefore for your own peace of mind and safety of your bum you don’t have to participate in the nonviolent protest, but keep yourself to yourself and watch how it evolves. Even though you may opt out for your own selfish reason, the benefits always accrue to both, those who protested as well as those who refused to participate.

      By the way do you think you are very clever? What does your wife/partner, your children think about you? A dumb ass, Smart Ass, a clever dick, ……. ?
      Nothing personal.

      • 0
        4

        NV
        Will you post me a pair of ear plugs?
        Then what about my brothers and sisters, friends and relatives.

        Soma

        • 0
          3

          NV
          .
          “…Then they came for me
          And there was no one left
          To speak out for me.”
          Were you a ‘terrorist’ by any chance?

          Soma

          • 4
            0

            soman

            “Were you a ‘terrorist’ by any chance?”

            Here is a brief introduction to Martin Niemöller:
            Martin Niemöller (1892–1984) was a prominent Protestant pastor who emerged as an outspoken public foe of Adolf Hitler and spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps, despite his ardent nationalism. Niemöller is perhaps best remembered for the quotation: “First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out…”

            Holocaust Encyclopedia
            MARTIN NIEMÖLLER: BIOGRAPHY

    • 4
      0

      I agree that there have to be limitations on the level of sound. The Janagosha was planned only for 15 minutes. No one complained of the noise. The honking last week was only for a few minutes. But the restriction must not be to the point of extinguishing a right, as the Indian Supreme Court also emphasised. If noisy protests are to take place daily in a place close to a school or hospital, then protestors can be asked to find another place-

      • 0
        0

        Dr.Jayampathy Wickramaratne
        .
        What is your honest opinion about the loudspeaker atop the Buddhist Temple and Muslim Mosque vis a vis religious freedom?

        Soma

        • 0
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          This matter was decided by the Supreme Court in Ashik v Bandula (Noise Pollution Case). The case commenced with an application by the Trustees of the Kapuwatte Mohideen Jumma Mosque of Weligama challenging the action of the second respondent, the Assistant Superintendent of Police, in not issuing a loudspeaker permit under s 81 of the Police Ordinance to the extent permitted in previous years and in imposing restrictions on such use, as being in breach of their fundamental rights. When the matter was supported for leave to proceed the Supreme Court noted that the application raised fundamental issues with regard to sound pollution and the standards that should be enforced by the Central Environmental Authority and the guarantee of the equal protection of the law in that regard. Accordingly, notice was issued on the Central Environmental Authority which was later added a respondent.
          The Environmental Foundation Limited was permitted to intervene in view of the general concern that emerged in the case requiring adequate legal safeguards to protect the people from exposure to harmful effects of sound pollution. A lawyer who sought to intervene representing the interests of persons affected by noise pollution was also added as a respondent.
          After a lengthy inquiry, the Court issued directions on how permits should be issued. This was applicable to the use of loudspeakers everywhere.. No permits were to be issued for the use of loudspeakers between 10.00 pm and 6.00 am. Permits may be issued for the use of loudspeakers during such period for special religious functions and other special events but only after ascertaining the views of persons who live in the vicinity. In respect of the hours from 6.00 am to 10.00 pm, permits may be issued for limited periods of time for specific purposes subject to the strict condition that the noise emitted does not extend beyond the precincts of the particular premises. However, the directions are not followed now. I agree with the judgment.

          • 0
            0

            ………….. Permits may be issued for the use of loudspeakers during such period for special religious functions and other special events but only after ascertaining the views of persons who live in the vicinity……….
            Is this not vague and indeterminate ? How can the Police get views of the people in the vicinity? by a poll? How do people express their view ?
            No wonder it is not followed.

          • 0
            0

            Dr.J.W.
            What do you suggest we should do now?

            Soma

  • 3
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    • 9
      0

      Reginald Shameless Pererass

      Come again.

    • 6
      0

      Regi Shemale boy, thanks for keeping your brilliant comment quite brief. Please come again with more of your stupidity later.

    • 5
      0

      Mr SHEMALE seems to be back to play housanas… where had you all these been ? See, where your hideouts are – TORONTO canada, … there are enough srilanken srilankens to teach you that Rajaakshe – alpha animals are the curse to all srilankens.

    • 2
      0

      You speak while in your uniform and show all of us how shameless the Sri Lankan military is. Don’t blame others for disgracing the country, but blame shameless you for the demonstration in uniform the capability of war crimes the military you represent.

  • 8
    0

    Noisy Protests are very important in a democracy.

    China may be a global super power however I feel sorry for the Chinese people who have no say in matters related to government policy or individual likes and dislikes.

    They are turned into zombies by the Communist Party Of China

    This should never ever be allowed to happen in Sri Lanka

  • 3
    0

    Plato, he is not nicknamed Polwicka. It is another criminal lawyer in Kandy name Wickremaratne, who was in forefront in democratic and human rights issues while in the uni and called with this nick name. He was a clever lawyer and a gem of a man. He died some years ago.

  • 0
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  • 1
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    SJ,
    It is a very unfair comment.

    After the 2015 General Election it was felt that the presence of Jayamoathy in parliament was essential for the preparation of a new progressive constitution .

    Jayampathy was a dedicated and committed Samasamajist unlike our erstwhile leftist leaders.

    Moreover, he steadfastly supported minority rights without any compromises whether strategic or tactical.

    Furthermore, he never participated in a single UNP Parliamentary group meeting.

    • 1
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      srikrish,
      Some people think UNP is not part of part of Sri Lankan politics and Rajapaksa is part of Sri Lankan because they are close with China. China is the deciding factor here.

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        1

        Missed your regular sleeping tablets?

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      Srikish
      It was felt by whom?

      Soma

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      Which comment?
      Can you repeat it please?

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      SK
      “Caught With Pants Down For Selling Duty Free Land Cruiser” was not my comment.
      It was CT’s.

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    Black Lankan.

    Thanks for the clarification.
    Cheers.

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    0

    China suspended ALL economic accords after Australia threatened to undo the previous deal , leasing Darwin port for 99 years. China accused Australia of “cold war mind set and discrimination of their road to glory ideology”. The truth is China wanted the port more than a bilateral trade deal .

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