28 October, 2020

Blog

The Trouble With Mr Guruparan’s ‘Tamil Civil Society’ View

By Dayan Jayatilleka –

Dr Dayan Jayatilleka

Oh dear, oh dear, here we go again.

Early in his article Mr Guruparan writes “So much for the argument that LTTE was the only obstacle for the Sinhala polity to positively consider ‘state transformation’.” That is known as setting up a straw man and beating it. Who in the Sinhala polity wanted state transformation as distinct from state reform? Those who did, such as the Sudu Nelum supporters of CBK’s ‘union of regions’ packages of ’95 and ’97 (different from the more modest Aug 2000 draft Constitution) and those who agreed to the PTOMS, did not consider the LTTE as ‘the only obstacle’, and for the most part hardly seemed to consider the LTTE as an obstacle at all. Those in the Sinhala polity who did consider the LTTE the sole obstacle to anything and everything did not stand for state transformation or even state reform. In contradistinction to both positions, those of us who stood for structural reform of the state (‘state reform’) never held that the LTTE was the sole obstacle, but regarded it as the main, primary and principal obstacle at that stage of Sri Lanka’s history, and our contention was proven by the LTTE’s war against the IPKF and its post-Accord conduct as a whole. This third view held that prevailing over the LTTE was a necessary but insufficient condition of a lasting and fair peace.

Guruparan then writes that “the 13th amendment was drafted in a hurry”, which displays ignorance of the fact that most of its contents had been hammered out in deliberations from at least December 1985, through December 19th 1986 and early ’87. He should read some good books, such as those by KM de Silva, which track these negotiations.

Mr Guruparan’s would have been a fair critique had it concluded with a recognition of the 13th amendment as the start line for negotiations and took a strong stand for the re-allocation of the powers contained in the concurrent list so as to make devolution more meaningful. That however, is not his stand or the paradigm he is operating within. Thus he states approvingly, if a little grandiosely, that “the Tamil Civil Society has taken the position to reject the 13th amendment as a starting point or even a reference point to a political solution. We see any promise of incrementalism as an empty promise.”

According to Mr Guruparan, the first of the main flaws is that “the 13th amendment sits within a unitary state framework which provides the background for interpretations regarding the working of the 13th amendment being tilted in favour of the Centre.”

So, by this logic, any amendment which sits within a unitary state framework is irreparably flawed beyond acceptability. Thus his problem is not with the 13th amendment but with the unitary state framework which ‘provides the background’.

Logically he therefore wishes a reform which goes beyond the unitary state framework itself. That is a fundamental transformation which goes well beyond what the Catholics of Northern Ireland, led by the Sinn Fein/IRA as accepted in the Good Friday accords. But he is unwilling to submit it for the consent of his fellow citizens.

Mr Guruparan deliberately confuses the issue of seeking the democratic consent of the majority of one’s fellow citizens, with the question of the legitimacy of the state. The issue is that of the sovereignty of the citizens; popular sovereignty. No one is asking him to secure to consent of the state, but of his fellow Sri Lankan citizens, since any change such as that which he proposes, impinges on them.

Guruparan’s argument is that “when the Tamils feel that the State itself has lost legitimacy, invocation of the democratic principle within that state apparatus makes no sense.” Lenin has classically summed up what the state apparatus means: the bureaucracy, the armed forces, the police, the judiciary and the prison system. Althusser went further with his iteration of the Ideological State Apparatuses (schools, religious institutions etc). An ‘apparatus’ means precisely that. So Guruparan is either guilty of conceptual unclarity or deliberate sleight of hand in that he conflates ‘the state apparatus’ with the state formation; the state as a political unit, a political community with definite territorial contours, i.e. outer boundaries, borders.

One wonders which aspects of the state’s legitimacy Mr Guruparan rejects, because the relevant aspect here is that of the state as single territorial unit whose borders are co-extensive with its natural ones: i.e. a state that covers the whole island. The issue is not one of governance, where a great many questions of legitimacy may arise. Does Mr Guruparan recognize the legitimacy of the territorial unit and the resultant political community that is the Sri Lankan state? If not, then the matter is worse than one thought and as bad as one had feared: Mr Guruparan and ‘ Tamil civil society’ have a problem not merely with the unitary form of the state but with a single, indissoluble, united state of Sri Lanka.

Justifying his call for a transitional administration Mr Guruparan writes that “The social and political transition of the Tamil people from an environment of war and oppression to an environment of peace and justice cannot be achieved under the present framework of governance with or without the 13th amendment.” Here he shifts from ‘state to ‘framework of governance’, which is not quite the same thing. No matter. How would he define the ‘present framework of governance’? More importantly, under – or due to– which aspect or aspects of that ‘framework of governance’, is the transition to an environment of peace and justice ‘not possible’? Is his problem the style or political culture of governance or its framework, and if the latter, as seems to be the case, how far does it have to be changed BEYOND the 13th amendment, for peace and justice to be possible? What, in short, is the ‘transitional administration’ transitional to –in transition to—precisely in terms of, and as, a ‘framework of governance’?

On a personal note, Mr Guruparan uses a single quote of mine from 2009 to assert that “The important point to note is that Dayan is not really saying implementing the 13th amendment will benefit the Tamil people in the short or the long term. He is saying it will release Sri Lanka from international pressure or at least ease that pressure.”

Now that hardly explains my consistent public advocacy of and support for provincial level autonomy at least from 1983 as demonstrated by my chapter in the volume of the Committee for Rational Development (Navrang publishers), followed more explicitly in 1984 as a participant in and signatory to the deliberations and declaration of the United Nations University-Lanka Guardian (UNU-LG) South Asia Perspectives Project, which made the case for and laid out a scheme of provincial devolution. This was followed by my public support (including in print, in four cover stories for the LG) for Vijaya Kumaratunga who advocated provincial devolution (without permanent merger) in ‘1985-’88. Certainly in ’84-’86 none of this had anything to do with India or geopolitics.

None of this was without cost, either. It cost those of us on the Left who stood for autonomy, the support of a majority of Sinhalese; it made us vulnerable to the JVP’s attacks. Daya Pathirana was murdered BEFORE the Indo-Lanka Accord. 117 members of the SLMP were murdered by the JVP for their support of provincial devolution. I was an Asst Secretary of that party during much of that time and attended more funerals, heavy metal in or at hand, than I care to recall.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Latest comments

  • 0
    0

    I can’t help but feel the conflict between Mr. Guruparan and Dr. Dayan epitomizes the unnecessary conflict and misunderstanding between the ‘nations’ in this country. Both of you might agree ‘conflict’ is a neutral, it can result in good, in bad, even the down right ugly. All we have got so far is the ugly at a price that should shock the conscience of the country should the truth be revealed, as it will be one day. Surely the two of you have more things you’d agree on than disagree even though one might (at the moment) have more to loose than the other should it find it’s way to the public domain (an important point that maybe worthwhile sincerely understanding and acknowledging). Is it asking too much to request the two of you to put what seems to be intellectual bickering to productive use and perhaps work together on a road map that might work best for the sake of the people at stake here? All people are at stake whether they are blissfully ignorant of it or not. If we have something of concrete compromised substance to work towards, a vision, a plan perhaps authored by the two of you in consultation with the educated and informed masses, then perhaps we, the ordinary folk of this country, may have finally something coherent to rally around and realistically strive for. I am willing to do more than my fair share if only the two of you can.

    • 0
      0

      Coconut Donkey

      Great, if people can work together. Rather than being locked down in endless ideological conflict.

      However, if I did not misunderstand Guruparan. He is not happy even with 13+. Begs the question how serious he is.

      Guruparan talks about a “Transitional government” for Tamils. Reminds me of ISGA proposal by now defunct LTTE.

      I am forced to conclude Guruparan is a “Closet Ealamist”. His solution is Ealam. It is already on the table, indirectly. Not sure whether he has the balls to admit it at this stage though.

      Would be great if Sri Lankan intellectuals could engage in construtive and compromise seeking discussions. Rather than bickering.

      But, to be a realistic partner for peace, people like Guruparan must make a transition. Realize Sri Lanka’s unitary status as a state. It is and will be absolutely non-negotiable. Forever.

      No matter what cunning methods, such as ISGA, P-TOMS they try. Sri Lanka is one country.

      If we can discuss from that starting point, I see light at the end of the tunnel.

      Tamil moderates should now take over from people like Guruparan. Join millions of progressive among Sinhalese to move in that direction.

      • 1
        0

        Even if Guru was to publicly declare that he advocates nothing short of a separate state with complete autonomy, he should have a safe public space and freedom to do so and air his views. His right to do so must be protected and respected, whether you and i agree with him or not. This is a far cry from the situation that has and continues to prevail in this country. While i am not fond of the idea of a two state solution, at the very least i can empathize with guru in terms of why he’s been forced into a position to say what he’s saying. I believe to write anyone off as an ‘ealamist’ (which i don’t think Guru is in the sense of the word even though one can’t be blamed for interpreting it as such) and as a ‘threat to peace’ is exactly an indication of the complex problem at hand, to do this certainly cannot be part of any solution.

        • 1
          0

          The prior question is: who speaks for Tamil Civil society? Guruparan is just like the LTTE youth, [Edited out]
          I would like to hear Tamil women’s voices, civil society women’s voices. This Guruparan does not represent the majority Tamil civil society attitude at all – and we Tamil women must speak up and confront him and his massive EGO!

          • 0
            0

            Excellent point and agreed. It is also very encouraging, thanks for sharing.

          • 0
            0

            Afghan women also had their voices heard. So what happened?
            Be yourself(I) not the troll.represent “majority attitude”where on earth is that?

  • 0
    0

    Dayan J

    Thanks for this and making the day for RK Guruparan, In one of his earlier tweets he seemed upset that you didn’t mention him by name in the Daily Mirror article about ISGA. (Unless you correctly included him within the TNPF)

  • 0
    0

    Is it any use arguing about the 13th amendment when the 18th amendment has destroyed good and just governance which was the aim of the 13th?

    • 0
      0

      Justice

      Great point.

      Rajapssa Clan has destroyed a lot of things we built in this country with the 18th amendment. All institutions are in disarray. Except the institute of a rather large family from Hambantota.

      MPs who voted for the 18th amendment are nothing, but power hungry traitors.

      Sri Lanka now has to reverse all this. What a collosal waste of energy and time.

      Bare bottoms of people who put Sri Lanka in this despicable situation should be whipped in public. On Galle Face Green. Preferably on a sunny morning.

      • 0
        0

        “Bare bottoms of people should bewhipped in public.On Galle Face”

        CheeeChee mervin ge mallie or Sharia Law Aepa.

        “Sri Lanka is one country.”

        Money the root cause of all good Talks.
        70% of JT’s live in their land and you don’t belong there to be a majority if the vote is taken the Scottish way the just way.

        You can’t play ball on full court it’s not patience but negotiation of give and take not clubbing each other.It’s too late for a broke SL to continue to have the cake eat it and see it too. All wars are economic not partners.Wars are conflicts between the governments of countries.A war is not a border-skirmish or a confrontation between drunken sailors.

  • 0
    0

    To. Colombo Telegraph web site Managers & owners.

    Colombo Telegraph, display motto “In Journalism Truth is a Process”, if so why do CT blocks my (John Ryan) comments ?

    I think Colombo Telegraph has it’s own politics & only those fall in line with it are entertained in this website , not others , if not my comments wouldn’t have been blocked by CT, allowing me only a week or so only, perhaps I might have made all CT favorite bloggers & article writers defenseless with my comments, & to get blocked out by CT. I never used any bad language, though I was allowed to be attacked by bad language by some bloggers by CT.

    I’m not any body’s payroll but a Patriotic Sri Lankan & would for the rest of my life be as such only, perhaps some writers & bloggers, may be on some payroll of anti-Lankan NGO / INGO which I don’t care , but CT may rest assured that I’ll take any, on it’s horns & ground it, if CT guys publishes my comments.

    I put this to CT itself, DO YOU FEAR TRUTH SO MUCH ?

    PS.
    I KNOW CT HAS NO GUTS TO PUBLISH THIS, & if so, this same comment may appear in some other website, Pl. don’t blame me if CT fears, that ” In Journalism Truth is a process”. END.

    Thanks,
    John Ryan.

    We don’t have any comments from you, when did you post your comment? What is your comment? Please re-post – CT

    • 0
      0

      Uncle john-son.. what have you been smoking? i want some…

  • 0
    0

    Dayan, this is a bit confusing.

    Were you not part of the North East Provincial under Varadrajarperumal ? (conferred under the 13th amendment).

    Did you not find that Varadan did have chair to sit on ? None of the funds were released as the power to release funds rests in the center ?

    Were you not part of that fiasco ?

    Why are proposing the 13th amendment as a solution ?

    • 0
      0

      It is because I was there — though I resigned in four months having released an Open Letter to the Chief Minister– that I know this propaganda is nonsense.

  • 0
    0

    What DJ conveniently hides is the fact that the Northern provincial council will have very little power to do anything meaningful to the people as each and every proposal will be scrutinised and rejected by the Governor or the central government if it is politically detrimental to the Rajapaksa regime. This will definitely be the case under the present dictatorial Rajapaksa regime given that he is able to do whatever he wants under the 18th amendment. Mr Hisbulla’s lament on this very subject was mentioned by mr Guruparan in his article and Dayan fails to counter this in his quick response.

    Dayan has been a long-time proponent of the 13th amendment and he very well knows that it gives hardly any powers to the elected representatives in the council over how the North is governed. This suits his views on the unitary nature of the state. It is also akin to the disenfranchisement of the tamil people because the council will have no power to do anything without the Governor’s consent. In essence it will be a sham election to elect a sham council. Mr Guruparan’s article was very illuminating and many of the tamil supporters of the 13th Amendmend should be rethinking their views on it.

    Dayan wishes the central government to have total powers over the tamils, and by promoting the 13th amendment he also hopes to shut up the critics such as India, the US and the EU. It is no surprise the tamils are waking up to the charade of the 13th Amendment now that more and more people are exposing it as a trick to pacify the tamils and the internmtional community.

    • 0
      0

      My point is simple:

      ’13A: Use it or Lose it’. The choice is that of the Tamil politicians.

      The majority of citizens will not go beyond it. Already the Daily Mirror opinion poll shows 53% for its abolition; only 36% for retention—and I DO NOT think it is because they want to move beyond 13A in devolution! A referendum and there won’t be any large unit devolution at all.

      The NPC elections are an opportunity, but as was said of the Palestinians, they never lose an opportunity to lose an opportunity.

      Those in the TGTF-GTF-BTF-TESO-TPNF bloc who are salivating about the prospect of dispensing with 13A because the world community will ‘fix’ the Rajapaksas and secure something vastly better for the Tamils, haven’t learnt from History. The Sinhalese people always have recourse to democracy to remove those who have outworn their uses as defenders of the national interest and to put in those who can continue where the others left off. If not MR, Gota or SF or CBK, or Karu or Sajith or Dayasiri, or…the options are aplenty. But the successor regime won’t go beyond 13A because it cannot.

      • 0
        0

        Let the tamils decide weather they want 13 or separation from stone age monsters….not f******g sinhala modayas decide our own fate. Soon U will face federation or separation choice is yours…

        • 0
          0

          j.muthu

          Why don’t you take your brother Dayan back to Tamilnadu (homeland) and fight it out among yourself?

        • 0
          0

          yeah yeah, that was said for 30 years and we dealt with it…and can do so again, if pushed.

          • 0
            0

            yeah yeah yeah we will seeeee……………..

          • 0
            0

            What do you mean by dealt with? This time i think you will be pushed permanently sir.

      • 0
        0

        The majority of citizens will not go beyond it…what you mean by majority sinhala or tamils who decides. Which world u live? Tell me one example…

      • 0
        0

        The problem is that racists like Dayan have become cockish. Why should the majority of Sinhala people decide what the Tamils should to get. None of the solutions that led to peace in Bangaldesh, East Timor, Bosnia or South Sudan were achieved according to the wish of the majority in their respective countries. Sooner or later the international community is going to become impatient about the machinations of Sinhala racists and will force a solution to bring peace in Srilanka. Sinhala racists know this but are unwilling to accept it and are trying to brain wash the Tamils to accept whatever they give and be satisfied with it.

        • 0
          0

          Disregard the opinion of 85% of the population in Sri Lanka? If you exclude Tamils roughly. Not all Tamils support Ealam anyway.

          Just grab 1/3 of Sri Lanka’s land mass? Plus 2/3 of her coastline? For the Ealam pipe dream?

          Barbaric VP and LTTE tried that for 30 years. We all know how it ended.

          Get real now. Do not waste your time. Learn to live in harmony with other people. Regardless of their ethnicity or religion.

          There is always the common humanity that binds us together. If you can’t find any other reason.

          • 0
            0

            Roger harding first you prech Sinhala budhist terrorist rumps to live with others.

          • 0
            0

            In politics 85% of wrongdoers will override 15% of righteous people, but in morality it is other way about. At present Tamils are on a high moral ground as the victimized people being denied their inalienable rights, and are bound to win. It has been repeated ad nauseam by Sinhala racists about 1/3rd of the land and 2/3rd of the coast line, but that is where Tamils have lived for centuries and you cannot deny them of that now. LTTE failed because they did all foolish things and were branded as terrorists. Tamils are prepared to live in harmony provided they can live as first class citizens in dignity and safety, not depending on the mercy of the Sinhalese. There is rampant racism in Srilanka in all levels – Legislative, Executive and Judicial. If you cannot eradicate these you cannot talk about harmony.

            • 0
              0

              The trouble is that the Sinhalese wont buy your self serving story that the Tamils lived in all of the generously self defined North+East that comprises 1/3 of the island’s landmass.

              So to say that land should be devided up equally is racist of the Sinhalese?

              If you are only interested in the historical (read pre-colonial) Tamil nation you wont get much more than the Jaffna peninsula. There were hardly any pre-colonial Tamils in the Vanni or EP to talk of. And there is plenty of evidence to back that up.

        • 0
          0

          Come on, in none of those places did the State win an outright military victory.

          • 0
            0

            Srilanka won an outright victory because all the countries in the world supported the elimination of LTTE, on the false propaganda by Srilanka Government that LTTE is the one which is standing against any fair settlement to the Tamil problem and also Rajapakse promising India and US that he will grant autonomy to Tamils. If not for the support of India in sharing intelligence and destroying LTTE ships in mid sea and US arresting LTTE arms procurers, and China, Iran, Pakistan and Russia supplying weapons Srilanka could not have won this war. As for other countries world was divided and therefore the state could not secure a decisive victory over their non state actors. In Srilanka the situation at present is different. World is realizing that Sinhala people are the root cause of the problems in Srilanka and they will never agree to a fair share of power and territory with Tamils. The hard fought military victory is becoming useless as the Sinhalese are losing on the political front due to their intransigence.

            • 0
              0

              If the GoSL had such an awesome propaganda machine that it could fool the entire world into believing that the Tigers were terrorists and not peace-loving kittens, why can’t they convince that same world that there were no war crimes?

              The truth is that the Tigers themselves (along with those flag-waving diaspora idiots) did the convincing on what the Tigers were.

          • 0
            0

            We know how sinhala budhist terrorist won the war, deceived the world, just wait what price you going to pay u fooooooolllllllllllll

      • 0
        0

        Dayan,

        There is increasing realisation among the tamils that the 13A is a sham and I think the tamil people are going to choose to lose it as it gives them nothing of substance. If they take your advice and choose it then they will have no choice but to live with it as asking for genuine devolution and empowerment later will be seen as a separatist call again. Sinhalisation, militarisation and oppression will continue unabated without the council having any power at all to stop them. Is it any wonder more and more Tamils are voicing opposition to the 13a.

        I know you are persevering with your push for acceptance of the 13A may be because you gave an undertaking at the UNHRC in 2009 that your government will implement it. I bet many of the countries who supported you and voted for you are beginning to call you a liar and a cheat since four years after the end of the war no attempt has been made to find a political solution. Don’t you think India’s, the USA’s and the EU’s, and most of all, the tamil people’s frustration in this regard is perfectly understandable.

        Under the present dictatorial regime the Tamil people have no hope in hell of getting any substantive settlement and I am sure in your heart you do also have the same feeling.

        • 0
          0

          Nope, nobody is calling me anything bad on that score, because they know, and the record shows, I pushed for implementation soon after the Resolution and was sacked.

          • 0
            0

            “I pushed for implementation “

            LIAR its easy for you to look at the face and say I pushed .. then go over and confess.Religious bigots.

          • 0
            0

            Dayan,

            You haven’t responded to my other points about the negative aspects of the 13A. The tamils will lose not only their their language and religion but also their identity within a generation. It is nothing but a poisoned chalice for the tamils.

      • 0
        0

        Knowing very well that not only the Tamils but also Sinhalese rejected the 13A, I cannot understand why Dayan is still obsessed with it.

        When the British handed over the entire country to the Sinhalese without the consent of the Tamils, the Tamils were confined to a specific Tamil speaking region (North & East). As soon as the Sinhalese took over, they colonized the Sinhalese in the Tamil areas, they oppressed and deprived the fundamental freedom of the Tamils who were the rightful citizens of a specific land area. Since the Tamils are totally dissatisfied with their treatment (by the Sinhalese), they have all the rights to seek autonomy or complete independence from what they feel is an ethno-religious chauvinist oppressive state.

        Why should the Tamils negotiate (or rather beg) the Sinhala leadership to get their due rights? From the day the Tamils lost their rights to the Sinhalese (via British in 1948) they had been negotiating with the Sinhalese (Peacefully and violently), but they were only hoodwinked with broken promises. The Tamils know very well (it is more than clear) that the Sinhalese will not give anything (devolution) but why should we continue to ask them? The citizens of a specific Tamil speaking traditional land area, the Tamil Nation of Eelam should decide what is good for them.

        Indian mediation brought us the good for nothing 13A, Norwegian facilitation brought us nothing. If the Tamils are to negotiate for federal style devolution, they should involve a powerful country like US as the mediator. On the other hand, if they are opting for a self rule (like Kosov, South Sudan, etc), then they should be influencing/lobbying the IC (US, EU, UN, India, etc) to demand for a Eelam Referendum for self rule.

        It is in the hands of the Tamil Diaspora (and Tamil Nadu) to continue this struggle to free the Tamils from the ethno-religious (Sinhala-Buddhist) chauvinist oppressive state.

        • 0
          0

          Yes, hardly anything less than separate country will solve this complicated problem. even federal structure will give slowly rise to many other problem, if you solve, you solve it once for all like pakistan.

        • 0
          0

          Siva,

          You have asserted that “When the British handed over the entire country to the Sinhalese without the consent of the Tamils, the Tamils were confined to a specific Tamil speaking region (North & East).”

          This is simply untrue. When the British left in 1948 my Tamil grandfather, Winslow Alagaratnam, was Director of Irrigation in Ceylon. He continued to be employed in this position under the government of D S Senanayake, with whom he had a good relationship. He lived in Colombo, as did many of the Tamil members of my family. Though some lived in Jaffna, they were not “confined” to the North and East, or anywhere else.

          In 1960 my grandfather became the President of the Ceylon Association for the Advancement of Science. As I say, he was Tamil. He also placed his nation ahead of his race. Though his first language was Tamil, he was also fluent in English, and had reasonable command of Sinhala (though he couldn’t read or write the language). He identified himself as “Ceylonese” but regarded himself (as did others in my family) as a Ceylon Tamil. He had sufficient pride in his Tamil culture and ancestry to change his name from Alagaratnam Winslow to Winslow Alagaratnam (taking a Tamil surname rather than Winslow, which was the name of the American Baptist priest who converted his grandfather from Hinduism).

          During the 1970s I was lucky enough to spend many hours talking with him while walking around the ancient irrigation works he had directed the renovation of. These were mostly in the north and east of the island and had been built by the famous Singhalese kings of Anuradhapura and Polonnaruwa. Some of these kingdoms were ruled by Tamil families at times (as were other kingdoms in Sri Lanka). There have been many kingdoms in the history of Sri Lanka and their borders have changed over the centuries.

          But there is only one island, and it is now a sovereign nation under international law. No “diaspora” propaganda campaigns or “pressure” from Tamil Nadu is going to change that.

  • 0
    0

    DJ resigned his 4 month sine cure in 1989. It will be edifying if he can inform the readership how many Board meetings he attended, how many Board Papers he submitted and how often he interacted with his Secretary and other Secretaries.

    • 0
      0

      Dayan will not reply you Chanakyan. He is an intelectual racist. The solution for SL problem must be based on what Tamils wants not what Sinhalese willing to give, which is against the true democracy. True democracy is accomodating the minority’s greviences, not other way around.

      • 0
        0

        Which textbook has that definition of democracy? :))

        • 0
          0

          You f****ing follow cuban democrcy fool…………look aroubnd and seee

        • 0
          0

          Same as Scottish referendum- Go fetch your book from the former colonial rulers.
          Only inhabitants of the nation can vote not the residents of Wales England or N.I.

          Superimposing/planting terrorist to vote in a referendum wont be accepted. Thats your problem Amen.

    • 0
      0

      Not often, because of what was going on…The Budget was prepared in the Indian High Commission!

  • 0
    0

    Folks,

    No one should forget that DJ advocated the Chechen solution and in essence promoted his friend Douglas Devananda to the same role in the North that Ramzan Kadyrov plays for Putin in Chechnya.

    Look at Wikipedia for who Kadyrov is. Here is a snippet:

    “…according to a member of Kadyrov’s entourage, ‘The people around him know that Kadyrov is a psycho who likes, for example, having sex while being observed by prisoners from his private jail, located in the village of Tsentoroi; the onlookers are forced to masturbate.'[61]”

    Now that the Boston Marathon bombers turned out to be Chechens, look at what this psycho is saying.

    This is from today’s New York Times: “Any attempt to make a connection between Chechnya and the Tsarnaevs, if they were guilty, is futile,” Ramzan A. Kadyrov, Chechnya’s leader, said in a post on Instagram. “They were raised in the United States and their views and convictions formed there. The roots of evil must be sought in America.”

    I leave it to the readers to decide what kind of man this DJ is, and whether Sri Lanka can look forward to any future with such people still around as thought leaders.

    • 0
      0

      Agnos,

      Dayan may be accused of being an apologist for the Rajapaksa regime but I don’t think you could accuse him of being an instigator of violence against the Tamil people. Douglas takes orders from the Rajapaksa brothers to kill Tamils and he also kills for his own political and financial benefit.

      • 0
        0

        DJ and DD go way back together to the Premadasa era, and the former knew all about the latter’s atrocities in Jaffna–after all he had access to military intelligence, and he wouldn’t fail to read the UTHR reports–, as well as the nature of the Chechen regime under Ramzan Kadyrov. That didn’t prevent him from advocating the Chechen solution for the North in print, even as he was representing Sri Lanka in Geneva as a diplomat.

        What is more, he has said he admired Putin and his Chechen solution, which essentially means he admired Kadyrov as well, and he wanted DD to do for his master in Jaffna what Kadyrov did for Putin in Chechnya. Is that not instigating murder, abduction, torture and rape?

        Do you need to know any more about this guy to see the utter depths of his depravity? He tries to cloak such unspeakable evil in his ‘realist’ philosophy. But it won’t wash. MR, GR, DJ and DD all have to go before any reconciliation is possible.

    • 0
      0

      This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy
      https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

    • 0
      0

      Er, excuse me….the Boston Chechen bombers were PRO-Chechen separatism and anti-Russia, unlike Ramzan Kadyrov who was an anti-separatist ally of Putin; a fusion of Douglas and Karuna.

      Interestingly Agnos has always been more vocal against Douglas, MR and of course me, than against Prabhakaran!

      • 0
        0

        No, the Boston Chechen bombers were motivated by Islamic radicalism/jihad not by Chechen separatism.

        I brought up Kadyrov’s words in the NYT to show how someone who so personified evil was talking about the ‘root of evil,’ the same doublespeak and public lies one hears from MR and DD.

        Indeed, the small percentage of Americans who know anything about Russia’s treatment of Chechnya are very sympathetic to Chechen separatism, and have been willing to grant them asylum. So unlike what a clueless Jehan Perera alludes to in another article, the American public is not going to be unsympathetic to Chechens, but they will carefully screen them for Islamic radicals.

    • 0
      0

      Surely his urine echo is of a desperate school teacher trying to make a horse drink thinking he is wielding a big stick.

  • 0
    0

    Simply unitray states are misfit to govern multi-ethnic diversity because most of the power reside with centre and it is narrow and hollow in polictical nature. Hence any power devolution will have complete meaning only if the elected governments is of federal nature. Without that any amendment or any 13 plus will not change groud reality.

    @all Tamils, please be united against the cheap trick of 13 plus to pacify and brainwash to another unreality.

  • 0
    0

    Dear Dayan,
    You as a scholar a lot of people including me had a great respect in you. However your recent political involvement put you to identify you as a “INTELLECTUAL PROSTITUTE”. Further your criticism on scholars like, Prof. Uyangoda and some others is really meaningful AND SHOWS YOUR ACADEMIC STANDARD. Those proves that you are a DISTINCT ACADEMIC.
    However your attempt to criticize on the writings of young people like Guruparan, put you further your slandered back. He is not a scholar at all. He is just a lawyer and [Edited out] activist. This is not what we are expecting from you as a scholar of Neo-marxism.
    Dayan, you have a lot of responsible on developing a theory related to “state reform in a post war country” following Sri Lanka.

    • 0
      0

      I didn’t criticize the writings of Guruparan. I didn’t know he wrote at all. I’ve never read him before. In fact in my original critique of the views expressed by him, Tamil civil society and the TNA President during the visit of the Indian MPs, I deliberately left his name out, though he was quoted in the HINDU report. However, in his article on this website he chose to criticize me by name several times. That of course has its polemical consequences. It is called self-defense.

      • 0
        0

        Suresh P never spoke about seperate internal administration in that meeting. He just keep silent when this issue was discussed. Pro tamil websites critisized him not for speaking for ISA with Indian delegation. Dr. D, you have to varify the facts b4 start writing, do not just depend on Hindu. Or else we have to think that u r writing with ulterior motives, just to passify MR n Co.

    • 0
      0

      Rochan

      As you said, Dayan lost his credibility as a ‘scholar’ or ‘intellect’ when he became a paid slave (earning his bread by buttering the regime). He is also well known for blowing his own trumpet. It is absolutely hilarious to see this so called ‘scholar/intellect’ engaging in cheap polemics in order to defend himself from a 25 years old young lawyer. This is the standard of Dayan. If his father was alive today that poor gentleman (a great human being) would have committed suicide.

  • 0
    0

    Thanks for your Reply Dayan,

    My above comment is because that we do not want to see you something outside our belief in your intellectualism.

    Though I was not get a chance to follow your courses at the University, the students talk about the quality of your lectures comparing other lecturers.

    Still I remember how much you read in the 3rd floor of the library before the lecture. The CUTE was that you keep the books order after you read.

    • 0
      0

      Power has got into his head and now that its almost lost he is leading folk up the garden path. Interlectual? Has Sri lanka produced one?Haha.

  • 0
    0

    A sentence of G on hurried drafting is taken for attack. Stealthy plagiarism is more appropriate. Bearings were taken from the miserable Indian Constitution. Some articles even display the same wording.

    The British take pride in the Westminster model they gave to the colonies. Impotent India capable of doing nothing worthwhile, imposed her ‘imperial legacy’ to boost her ego with a failing constitution. It was thrust on puny SL to marginalise the Tamils.

    Official documents of the period 85 to 86 were available to the Tamil side and they too have gone through the rigmarole. One may refresh one’s memory with the pages on Mahaweli to learn about circumlocution. JR’s brother the chief negotiator or discussant might have been weighty for the other side not for the Tamils.

    In one sentence, the documents say “Heads I win, tails you loose” and this is the parent of 13A. What has addled over 25 years has fully oozed out. Crush the useless shell is what Guruparan says. Those in administration know it. Glib talkers are strangers to reality.

  • 0
    0

    Of course Dayan is an intellectual. No doubt on that. He is one of the eminent political scientist in Sri Lanka. But we can not understand why he go behind politics.
    http://www.maayajo.org/IMG/SIMC/CV_H.E.%20Dr.%20Dayan%20%20Jayatilleka.pdf

  • 0
    0

    First and foremost the provinces were created by the British and has no relevance to the so called Tamil Kingdom. The Sinhalese will not allow the country to be decimated by propaganda and India. I think Tamils should abandon narrow nationalism and join with the Sinhalese to demand good governance with justice and FairPlay for all.

    • 0
      0

      Dear Vas,

      It is good that you accept that provinces were created by British (merging different kingdom (including Tamil Kingdom). The matter of the fact is not the propaganda and India you need to bother about but it is the historical and factual evidence that you cannot deny. Tamils and Sinhalese are inhabitants of the island currently known as SriLanka where Tamils are inhabitants of North East of the island.
      As long as Sinhala Nationalism exists it is unavoidable for Tamil Nationalism to exist. The British handed over the responsibility to rule the island expecting a good governance with justice and fair play for all but the six decades of experience shows that justice was not done and the governance turned into worst governance and most of the injustice was targeted towards people of North East because they speak different language, their religion is different to yours. Sinhala Nationalism exceeded its limits and today every Tamil in the North East are surrounded and threatened by armed Sinhala personal occupying illegally against the wishes of the natives.

  • 0
    0

    Dear Dayan,
    Can you please

    Why do you think that 13th amendment should be the starting point in negotiations?
    Do you think that unitary system of governance is the best solution to bring respectable peace between Tamils and Sinhalese instead of a united power sharing mechanism, considering the failure of the six decades of governance under unitary system?
    Under the 13th Amendment and unitary system who should have the overall power to run the region? Is it the Governor appointed by the President or Members elected by the people of the region?

  • 0
    0

    Ajith…. Power sharing with a greedy 5% of tamil population?

Leave A Comment

Comments should not exceed 200 words. Embedding external links and writing in capital letters are discouraged. Commenting is automatically disabled after 7 days and approval may take up to 24 hours. Please read our Comments Policy for further details. Your email address will not be published.