3 December, 2020

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Turnning 60: The DJ Files Declassified

By Dayan Jayatilleka

Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

Discussing his birth with biographer Ignacio Ramonet (‘My Life’), Fidel observed that a man is marked, shaped, by the times into which he is born; the period of history, its main dynamics and events. I was born on Dec 3rd 1956. On Dec 2nd 1956 half a world away on another, larger, tropical island, Fidel, Che and Raul and 80 others had landed in the leaky yacht Granma to start the revolutionary guerrilla war. (If one adjusts for the time difference, it was a gap of just a few hours). Dec 2nd is designated the Day of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Cuba, founded by Fidel and headed subsequently by Raul. I turn 60 the day that Raul will make his valedictory at the final mass rally in Santiago de Cuba to bid farewell to Fidel. The next day (Dec 4) Fidel’s ashes will be interred at St. Iphigenia’ cemetery where the Cuban national hero Jose Marti is buried. I have been but a poor and inconsistent follower and student, but I would not have been the man I became nor would my life have been what it has been, had I not been born under the sign of Fidel.

The philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre who pioneered “existential psychology” was of the view that one’s choices reveal one’s character and therefore you can understand yourself or anyone else by looking back and tracing the history of the choices they made at various turning points; forks in the road. He goes on to say that there is an original choice made most probably in adolescence if not childhood, which tends to be the key to all the subsequent choices, the tracing of which will reveal the project/s of the individual. Decades earlier, the psychologist Carl Jung, the dissenting pupil of Freud, had ventured to suggest that each of us has wittingly or unwittingly chosen a guiding archetype which we then internalize and act out/upon, and he identifies a menu of the master archetypes. One of the tasks of psychology is to uncover the recessed archetype.dav

One must be honest in using both these keys, because airbrushing or outright mythmaking is an omnipresent temptation. Therefore—and I suppose, also because of my journalistic lineage– I prefer to go by the record; by text, by the verifiable printed word, even or especially when the subject is myself. What I have as evidence are four essays, two in English and two in Sinhala, published in “Blue and White” the magazine of “St. Joseph’s College, Colombo, Ceylon” in September 1969 and November 1971, respectively the ‘Diamond Jubilee Number’ and ‘the 75th Anniversary commemoration number’ of the College. The former is listed as Volume 60, the latter, covering the period 1969-1970, as Volume 61. I have opted to reproduce the two English language texts.

The first of the two articles lists the author as “Dayan Jayatilleka, Grade 6A”. This means I was aged 12 plus (the magazine is dated Sept ’69 and I hadn’t turned 13 yet). It is entitled ‘I SAW THE HOLY LAND’ and is reproduced below:

THERE is no city in the world holier than Jerusalem, because three great religious faiths of the world–Christianity, Judaism and Islam–hold it sacred. But Jerusalem’s fame rests mainly on the fact that it is in the land of the Bible. Four years ago, I stood on Mount Zion and saw below a divided city. Barbed wire and cement barriers cut through the heart of the Holy City, and gun barrels on either side of the Mandelbaum Gate glistened in the sunlight. But today it is one city again.

In June last year, I walked along the streets of Jerusalem and visited the holy places surrounding it. Driving through the blistering heat of the valley of Jordan, I came on a cool evening to the hilltop Jerusalem.

Jerusalem was rich in a mixture of colours, like a Persian carpet. There was also a variety of sounds, sights and smells. The sound of church bells ringing, the chant of Moslem priests and the drone of the Jews praying at the Wailing Wail created a pleasant noisy confusion. Beside me was an Arab boy trying to sell me something from his tray of coloured sweetmeats, and beyond was an Israel soldier walking with a gun slung on his shoulder. However, I had not gone there to enjoy the excitement or beauty of that city, but to pay homage to its holiness. The next morning, as I went from one sacred spot to another, things I had learnt in the Bible, things ancient and holy, came to life. There in the Garden of Gethsemane, my mind was filled with the image of Jesus awaiting crucifixion and praying to His Father. With a strong wind blowing in our faces, we climbed a small hill, and olive twig into my hand, for that was the Mount of Olives. After a visit to the church of the Holy Sepulcher, we drove to Bethlehem and there visited the church of the Nativity, built on the spot where Jesus Christ, our Saviour, was born.

In Nazareth a church is being built which, it is said, will be one of the most beautiful in the world when completed. But it was the past that thrilled me more. I went step by step deep into a cave where the Holy Family had lived, and saw where they had stored their food and where St. Joseph had worked.

While driving down a long winding road, our driver stopped to point out to us a hillock, full of scrub and stone with goats and sheep grazing idly. No scene could be more ordinary and yet this was the spot from which the message of Christ went out to the world, for here He had spoken to His people and delivered what we now call the Sermon on the Mount. So, in the Holy Land, names and places and events known to me in the Bible became an experience I shall never forget.” (Blue & White, Sept 1969, Vol 60, pp. 72-73)

What strikes me are the following features, though there are others that may be noted by the reader. Firstly, internationalism: the choice of an international subject, and an early experience of the world. “In June last year” means I was writing about a visit in 1968 at age 11 plus. The reference to “four years ago” means a visit in 1964 at age 7. Secondly, the schoolboy essay shows an acute awareness of changing politico-military contextual realities. Thirdly, the non-mention of parents and the individuality of the reported experience indicates an early crystallization of a strong, independent identity, consciousness and perspective. Fourthly, the outlook is clearly cosmopolitan. Fifthly, the figure of Jesus Christ emerges strongly.

What would have been a display of cosmopolitanism characteristic of a Colombo private school is made rather more interesting by the Sinhala essay (on page 111) entitled “Magay Rata” (“My Country”) and signed Dayan de S. Jayatilleka, ‘Hayaveni Pela’ (Grade Six). I was among the few, perhaps the only one, to contribute to the college magazine in both languages.

Most telling of all from the point of view of Jungian archetypes and Sartrean existential psychology is the essay in Volume 61 of the college magazine, covering 1969-1970 and bearing the date of issue November 1971 (the delay being due to the April 1971 insurrection and the closure of schools). While page 67 carries an article in Sinhala on “How to improve Lanka’s Economic Situation” by Dayan Jayatilleka of Grade 8, the section designated “Student Writers Forum” carries an essay in English by Dayan de S. Jayatilleke of ‘Grade 9A Science’. Thus the writer was aged 13 plus. The essay was entitled “WHEN DEATH IS WELCOME”:

THE Veddah was still alive when they found him lying in a pool of blood, hideously scarred and mutilated almost beyond recognition. While they carried him to the village, he rambled on deliriously: He spoke of a huge beast with gleaming fangs, and kept muttering in agonized whispers about flashing claws and blazing eyes. “The beast, the beast….” and then death mercifully claimed him. Yes, the reign of terror had begun.

Each night the creature of the Veddah’s terrifying tale came out of the jungle, and each time he claimed a victim. Today the village would mourn for a lonely boy who had strolled along a jungle path, and tomorrow it would be a poor, helpless farmer.

The village was caught in a grip of fear. Nobody was brave enough or foolhardy enough to venture out of his home in the dark. Nobody would even leave the village in broad daylight, for the jungle lay close by, and in in the jungle the night is eternal. Doors padlocked, windows barred, gate shut, fences quickly erected, the village was a virtual fortress. Hardly a thing moved on the struts; and by dusk, it was a ghost town.

Soon it was harvest time. But the fields lay deserted. Nobody would reap the harvest or thresh the paddy. There was no grain to store, and as the fruits of the season fell upon the ground for the last time, the village starved.

If the village had to be saved, the beast had to die. Even the children knew this. One day, after weeks of argument, the elders decided that there was only one hope. They had to flee from the village. The villagers came out and assembled in the bare, dusty square, and were told of this decision.

Suddenly a voice cried out: “No”. As the crowd stirred and the excited jabbering ceased, the voice went on:

“We must not leave our homes: This is our village, the village of our ancestors. It must be the village of our children some- day. We cannot leave. ‘We must not run. Are we not men? I will stay back and fight this beast you fear so much. If death is to be my fate, then it is welcome. I would have fought and died for my home, my village, my forefathers and for the generations unborn.

What better death is there?”

In the still morning light, they saw him go. The old stared blankly. The women wept, and the boys cheered, and in the crowd there were some old men who could not stop tears come to their eyes as they remembered the now forgotten dreams of their own once proud youth. One, a lean, gnarled tracker, spoke their silent thoughts: “May the gods go with him for he surely goes to his death.

It was nightfall, the time for sacrifice. An eerie sound spread through the jungle. The silence was broken only by the unearthly hoot of an owl or the repulsive cackle of a prowling hyena.

In the dark depths of the jungle, man and beast stalked each other. The hunter was hunted. The hunted had turned hunter. The air was charged with tension. The hunter could hear each second tick by. Sweat made beads on his forehead and icy fingers crept up and down his spine. The beast had to be near. He could sense it, somewhere very close, it had to be. And then–the beast sprang! The shotgun dropped from his hand. Now it was a matter of minutes. Pain, death– he was ready to accept, but not defeat. They fought on, under the stars, with only the jungle and its creatures as spectators. They fought on, man and beast, knowing that life was not the prize but pride. One would die, perhaps both, but not to yield. That was the prize, and it was a common bond.

The man plunged his knife in, again and again. Tooth and nail against cold steel. For hours they fought and it was as if all the old battles were being re-enacted—Theseus versus Minotaur and a thousand other battles, here it was, in the jungle that night.

As the night sky changed and a new glow fell upon the wild ground, two figures sank slowly to the earth.

In the bright light of day, the villagers, curious but cautious walked quietly into the jungle. They found them—the man and the beast, lying in each other’s arms, united it seemed in a strangely poignant tableau of death.” (Blue & White, Vol. 61, Nov 1971, pp. 55-56)

The title betrays the influence of the 13 year old author’s reading: “where death is welcome” is clearly an echo of Che Guevara’s “wherever death may surprise us, let it be welcome” from his valedictory “Message to the Tricontinental”. There is very clear difference in the two essays of 1969 and 1971 i.e. the ages of 11plus and 13plus. The first piece on the Holy Land befits a Josephian living down Ward Place, a prize winner and a member of the BOAC Junior Jet Club; a confident precocious boy with a distinctive gaze on the world, who would graduate with a “first class of unsurpassed excellence” in Political Science (Prof. Emeritus Carlo Fonseka, ‘13th Amendment, Dayan & Malinda’, The Island, July 15, 2009) and wind up an ambassador to the UN-Geneva and Chairman of the ILO. The writer of the second essay was probably no less destined to become a man who turned 30 living La Vida Clandestina –as Enrique Oltuski, activist of the Cuban revolutionary urban underground, youngest member of Fidel’s first Cabinet and later Che’s deputy Minister, entitled his memoirs.

In the 13 year-old boy’s essay, there is blood, violence, danger, pain, combat, death, community, extreme situation, existential threat and existential choice. The internationalism of the early essay has narrowed in focus and increased in depth and intensity. The outward gaze had moved inward and then outward again but into the dialectic between individual and community. A possible explanation is an awareness of the violence and massive repression of April 1971, but that doesn’t fully explain the new paradigm, because the essay is not one of a heroic collective subject—student rebellion, revolutionary party or guerrilla band—but an exceptional individual and a lonely fate. The classic Jungian archetype has therefore been arrived at by an only child/only son at age13 and stands revealed: ‘The Hero’. In closer focus the archetypal figure belongs among what Leonard Cohen called “lonesome heroes” (“Leonard Cohen’s Lonesome Heroes” was the title of a scholarly documentary film).

Fast forward to the present: ‘“Every civilization rests on its heroes”, stated Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka at the book launch of “War Heroes Killed in Action” by General Gerry de Silva. “Civilizations and even communities”, he explains, “attract barbarism, invasions, and aggressors”. It is the heroes who come forward, “willing to do what the average is unwilling to do, willing to take a risk, suffer pain, even death in defence of the community”, that protect communities and civilizations from these dangers…“If we don’t honour our heroes, what are the values we pass down to our next generation?” ’ (‘Spare a Thought for Disabled Soldiers’, Shivanthi Ranasinghe, Ceylon Today, Nov 7, 2016).

My book on a paradigm-changing hero of modern world history, Fidel, has yielded an Iranian (Farsi) edition while a new book entitled “Blood and Progress: Violence in Pursuit of Emancipation” by Nick Hewlett, D.Litt., Professor of French Studies at the University of Warwick and author of “Badiou, Balibar, Ranciere” (Bloomsbury 2007) has just been published by Edinburgh University Press (Sept 2016) and reveals the influence of my work. The references in his chapter on “Castro, Humanism and Revolution” to my tripartite classification of positions on violence, “convincing argument” encompassing Sorel, Camus, Sartre and Fanon, and my “insightful study” of Fidel’s ethics of violence, constitute a welcome if entirely unintended birthday gift as I turn 60.

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Latest comments

  • 13
    0

    Many happy returns of the day Dayan! A man of your ability should not be holding a brief for MaRa!

    • 14
      0

      DJ belated wishes to you for your birthday.

      But what matters is when will you grow up ?

      We have the feeling you have been fallen that deep being unable to find your way back, is not that right ?

      Your performance in creating divisions the nations have been more than making efforts to get all folks together for a better future. Why you and your ziamesian brother Mahindapala from Australia have been that irreparably mutated this way is our million dollar question yet.

      • 1
        3

        // But what matters is when will you grow up ? //

        Not a nice thing to say on the man’s birthday.

        • 6
          1

          One s birth day is an another day only. As a self proclaimed prince, it could be different to him. But we need to focus on the permaent damage being made by this idiosyncratic academic on country s issues. Did you listen to his programmes on Sirasa these days?
          Killi led senders or few others are on the path of attacking the current gov this time even going an extra mile- through Gammadda village upliftment programme. Like gonage wade buruwa baragena to be in good books and change the attitude of the village level people. May be focus is on Sajith Premadasa to be next leader so that Dayan Jayathilaka could get posted to anywhere again ? I have never seen anyone that has been that selfish than DJ. This you need to this DJ, on your 60th B day.

        • 6
          1

          Gopal Patpodi

          “Not a nice thing to say on the man’s birthday.”

          When can we say it, let me guess maybe on rest of the 364 days?

          Whats wrong with wishing a child to grow up? If a grown up doesn’t think and act like one, what do you call the person?

          Dayan

          My advance wishes to you

          Please grow up tomorrow.

    • 9
      1

      Dear DJ

      QUOTE
      But I would not have been the man I became nor would my life have been what it has been, had I not been born under the sign of Fidel UNquote

      Why you mix it with Fidel or his ideology – you would not have been the man turned out to be- if you had not been that malicious, envious, hypocrite, divious – please let go through your activtieis you have deliberately done sofar – it will be worth for the nation, if you could see it back LET alone today.

    • 9
      1

      What kind of ablities are u talking about ?

      1) selecting references to his articles ?

      2) OR the ablities in the line of sitting with low lives such as Wimal Buruwanse ( who is the drama queen of the nation in twisting any good moves to other way around – just because not having proper education).

    • 9
      1

      DJ why we stay talking about Cuba, why not SRILANKA in current context ?

      What do you think how we could come out of the deep shit pit in terms of not being that extremist but turning us the majority to reconciliation having faced the war for the last 30 years ?

      Why you hang on with MR men or the supporters instead of doing some good work towards PERMENT PEACE of this country ?

      If your energies were spent to working for peace, we could have been happier on your birth day…. unfortunately, your mediation have done more harm than the good… that is the truth as it is .. when looking back. Even today, if questioned, where you have sitting with…. you will say, WITH Rajapakshes right ?

    • 6
      1

      Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

      RE: Turnning 60: The DJ Files Declassified

      1. “On Dec 2nd 1956 half a world away on another, larger, tropical island, Fidel, Che and Raul and 80 others had landed in the leaky yacht Granma to start the revolutionary guerrilla war.”

      Happy birthday, and thanks for the information and declassifying of the DJ Files.

      Anyway, what flipped when you became a crony and stooge of Mahinda Rajapaksa? The Stolen billions that belonged to the public? Can you declassify that as well?

      2.” The philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre who pioneered “existential psychology” was of the view that one’s choices reveal one’s character and therefore you can understand yourself or anyone else by looking back and tracing the history of the choices they made at various turning points; forks in the road. He goes on to say that there is an original choice made most probably in adolescence if not childhood, which tends to be the key to all the subsequent choices, the tracing of which will reveal the project/s of the individual.”

      Yes. For most the characters is developed in early childhood and teenage years, and the environment in which the person grew up.

      3. “What would have been a display of cosmopolitanism characteristic of a Colombo private school is made rather more interesting by the Sinhala essay (on page 111) entitled “Magay Rata” (“My Country”) and signed Dayan de S. Jayatilleka, ‘Hayaveni Pela’ (Grade Six). I was among the few, perhaps the only one, to contribute to the college magazine in both languages.”

      Dayan, only Native Veddah Aethho are qualified to say, “Magay Rata” (“My Country”). The other, the Paradises, Paras are not Qualified to say “Magay Rata” (“My Country”).

      You shoud have said, I am Para, but this is now my stolen and adopted country, “Mama-Para, Namuth Meka Horakam Karapu Dan Mage Rata.”

      The Para-Sinhala, the Para-Demala, the Para-Marakkkala, the Para-Portuguese, the Para-Dutch, the Para-Malay, the Para-Suddho, and others Paras, are Prasdeshis, Foreigners in the Land of Native Veddah Aethho.

      Why do the Para-Sinhala, Para-Demala and other Paras want to hide the fact that they are Paras in the Land of Native Veddah Aethho, they came to occupy illegally by Hora-Oru, Kalla-Thoni and Illegal Boats.

      Even the Lies and Imaginations of Monk Mahanama in Mahawamsa says so, which was swallowed lock, stock and barrel by Professor Ediriweera Satahchandra in his Play “Sinhabahu”, that also added fuel to the ethnic conflict between the Para-Sinhala and Para-Tamils.

      Do the Paras from Bharat, Damba-Diva, India have 48 Chromosomes or 46 in their bodies?

      References.

      1. The Vedda Tribe

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f89NuukY32U&t=42s

      2. Tamil-speaking Veddas of Vaharai await war recovery support

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HeFCuZwexRw

      3. Mitochondrial DNA history of Sri Lankan ethnic people: their relations within the island and with the Indian subcontinental populations

      Through a comparison with the mtDNA HVS-1 and part of HVS-2 of Indian database, both Tamils and Sinhalese clusters were affiliated with Indian subcontinent populations than Vedda people who are believed to be the native population of the island of Sri Lanka.

      http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/v59/n1/full/jhg2013112a.html

    • 9
      1

      Plato.

      I am sorry to bother you.

      Is this another “me and I” typing?

      I have a story about me and I. Would you please read it and comment on it?

      I heard the death of Castro when I went to the market to by some onion and garlic for me and my family. The vendor asked me whether I knew Castro personally. I said I didn’t know him personally however I came to know about him through news media which fed me the news.

      This is my story about how close I was to Castro.

      • 5
        0

        NV: To make your story achieve political significance, you have to say the Archbishop of Canterbury also purchased onion and garlic from the same vendor! That will offset every other flaw in your logic.

    • 2
      1

      To this day, what these beared growing men for their laziness have learnt nothing. Just hang on it calling themselves subjectively as if they are real sympathisers of Fidel or Che. To me these men are on the top of the list to have deceived themselves also harming the society sofar. Growing beard to get recognition is the only what they have learnt sofar. Nothing else. I respected Wasidewa in 70ties, see how turned out be by today- no different to an another perk absuive man no second to Weerawanse. Lately, we happened to see how WEERAWANSE run his life today. His palace is similar to that of a traditional wealthy person of the country.

    • 1
      1

      Having studied all the comments, I dont think DJ would commit suicide since all these were against him. We have no idea he deserves them or not. However, he should grow up at least at his 60 is what my granny said to me this morning.

    • 1
      1

      Most men with grown beards in SLanke politics or spot light today make every efforts to be part of Maxisim/Chesism etc -but their realities or what they delivered sofar have been beyond all such theroies.
      Sadly, Lankens are no means fit to such immitations.

      Wasidewa FORexample became so PERKS interesting man as no others during the last regime. Today, like a rewined person, he adds his thoughts against ruling men. In the past, as an another old pumpkin his presence was no seen.

  • 6
    2

    Happy birthday!!

    Ready for few more debates in any forum.

    May GOD!! bless DJ.

  • 16
    2

    Thinks he was destined to be a Che or a Fidel and ends up becoming a political appointee of Mara. What a pathetic life. Not much to blow trumpet.

    • 8
      1

      Saddest thing is he refers Fidel and behaves totally opposite to hiim supporting most devious, radical, extremist elements of SRILANKEN nation – Rajaakshe elements of the nation.

      Why is that ?

      Can anybody please tell me, has Fidel ever asked anyone to be that extremist ? I dont think so.

      This man makes every efforts to interepret Rajakashe deserves an another term. There I did not knnow what went through his head. Even a 10 year old with a healthy mind would have been against Rajapakshe s greediness to lanken politics even today. They may question, if failed to make changes during his previous two terms, how can he do it again.

      • 1
        2

        Leelawathi

        Why RajapKsha deserves another term:

        https://youtu.be/xIoqholH508

        Doesn’t he deserve to be tbe king?

        Soma

        • 2
          1

          Soma, those were the days, that almost were fainted with elemination of LTTE by collectivity. That then govt marketed. That is normal. Now the very same man having worked with YOUR athigaru from 2009 to 21Nov2014 – having studied him further.. for what the man would have been capable…. is telling the real truth to the world.
          Rajakashe was the most abusive among all abusive politicians in this lost nation. Not only locals but entire world have evidence to prove about him and his abusive politics.

          Today he is close Mangalaramaya of Batticalo and the temple or sodomy houses of BBS criminals in Colombo.

          Believe or not, LIke or not, Rajaakshe have to face his fate in the next few months.

          Not many are happy the way current regime block MR and family being NOT jailed yet for all the high crimes deliberately done to this nation (NOT ONLY NOTHERNERS but ALSO SOUTHERNERS ).

        • 2
          1

          Soma how much you get from Rajapakshe men for your back licking tasks ?

          They have enough money from all loots.

          You will have a permament job in that line, no need to worry at all for next 30 years, even after Rajaapskeh will have been in jails, they will pay your bills accordingly. Good luck

        • 3
          1

          soma

          “Doesn’t he deserve to be tbe king?”

          He was king of the Idiots twice.

          Do the idiots want him to be King third time? Did the average IQ of 79 of the idiots drop more?

  • 2
    1

    [Edited out]

  • 8
    0

    Wish u a happy 60th Birth day! Growth of Age not always productive. Fidel is a revolutionist! He did something good to the society! I don’t think he ever became a racist or associated with fundamentalist.

    • 6
      1

      Ajith,

      it has been the nature of lankens even if they describe them as pro-revolution men -but them to have been captured by all silly but thuggish men such as Rajaakshes.

      Just interview DJ by yourself and get more what he has got to say about Rajapakshe wonders. There he will take days to praise even going an extra mile to bring his kind of explanation about the magical powers of Rajaakshes. That he has been doing even today. That is the saddest truth about this idiosyncratic self proclaimed Mr ” I am the one and only”.

      • 1
        2

        Sinchuappu

        Essential viewing for you:

        https://youtu.be/xIoqholH508

        Soma

        • 2
          1

          These are for just for jokers.

          Any politician would talk in compliance with the governing party when they are with them.

          But today, My3 has proved it – all what he happened to go through under MR regime was just because of the fears exercised by Rajapakshe thugs.

          First to add the kind of supportive thoughts

          1) Mervin Silva – fomrer front dog of MR political abusive mechanisms

          2) Now the current President reveal on and off the former realities with MR regime…

          3) Those men now are under JO will have to reveal the truths to the courts when allegations against them are being investigated.

          So Soma your efforts will never succeed.

    • 2
      1

      Turning 60 is something important to look back his own life. What his thoughts and provocative presenatations resulted. Had he sensed it as an average, things would have ended up so different no doubt.
      Why he is suffering from even at 60 – that he is the only person to know it better in terms of lanken external affairs mainly focusing on Euro region ? Why he too is suffering from the fears of the west- no far from most uneducated represenatives such as Wimal Weerawanse. Why the phobia of their kind seem to be not vanishing even at his 60 th birthday ? All these he he should be able to rethink being in his own mental asylum.

      Why not if he would be able to sense it today, surely, he could approach his Guru -Mafia king of all devious and extremist tactics – none other than Mahinda Rajaakshe. Even Hitlor is said to have good advisers that could change the aggressions of their leader to that time. Why not the same could work for Mahinda ULTRA extremist that stay unturned in the lanken peace and reconciliation process.

  • 1
    7

    Happy B’day DJ – your legacy is impressive and admired!

    • 12
      1

      What Legacy you are talking about please ?

  • 11
    1

    Is there no end to this man’s self-adulation and pompous view of himself?

    Had his childhood efforts been reflected on by some independent writer, no doubt that readers would be impressed by a precocious boy with much promise. Alas, many things happened on the way to that three-score landmark that resulted in the present character who has a history of highly questionable merit.

  • 2
    1

    Belated wishes for your happy birthday, Dayan!

  • 1
    1

    Wish You a Happy Birthday,Dayan

  • 4
    1

    Native.

    I Know what you mean.I did not want to be unkind to Dayan on his Birthday.
    But right along there was this bloated ego,to the extent that Fidel Castro and he were on the same wave-length!
    There was also another Castro in the LTTE!

  • 1
    0

    Many Happy Returns DJ.

    On a day like today, perhaps it’s best to think that there is still time to redeem all that was promised in those halcyon younger days. The best is yet to come?

  • 6
    0

    Smart patriot Dr.DJ,
    Belated happy birthday to you.

    Now that you have declassified your files related to St Joseph’s College, TA Jayah Mawatha, Maradana,Colombo,
    why not declassify the files of the following when they were at St Joseph’s. Please do not forget to underscore anything related to the type of patriotism they possesed.
    1.GG Ponnampalam
    2.C Suntharalingam
    3.VA Kandiah
    4.P Ramanathan
    5.K Palakidnar
    6.KN Devanayagam
    7.N Nadarajah
    8.Alfred Thambiah

    As a bonus to the readers could you please do another one declassification ? This file is that of Mohan Peiris.

    PS : 1. This is just for academic interest : why you titled your essay in Sinhala as “Magay Rata” and not ” Apey Rata “.

    2. In your time at SJ was Tamil Language a subject for the Tamil speaking students ? If so, was there any space given to Tamil essay/s in the school magazine ?

    3. During the assembly/or prayer or sermon time non catholic students do what ?
    Late Mr.Premadasa stayed an ardent Buddhist even though he was from SJ.

  • 1
    2

    What Thero saying is Castro needed long cigars, Europeans drinks and 35,000 women to destroy the world only after when he was in his 30s.

    But the Thero De Silva born with it from 1956, by the grace of his god Castro. Thero’s warning is you guys may have to take it for another 30 years of him. Are your belts buckled up? Rough ride….

    Thero is so funny trying make him with filthy Castro to look like Ramakrishna and his disciple Swami Vivekananda. Such a shallow Thero.

    Who is that Mongolian young man, photo down below Thero’s passport Photo. Anybody knows him?

  • 3
    0

    “The philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre who pioneered “existential psychology””?

    Sartre has been ‘accused’ of many things by many people, but not this by anyone before.
    He dabbled in existentialism for quite a while but drifted far from that philosophical tradition to which sections of the European far right clung on.

    He was a great thinker who talked of many things. But to call him a pioneer of “existential psychology” is a little difficult to digest.

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    Happy birthday to you! Many happy returns. Bensen

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    Dayan you surely will grow up one day…..,the day you ditch the Rajapaksa gang.Until then dear kiddo you will remain a lil incompoop..Happy Bad Day.

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      Oneday ?

      When ?

      His growth after being entire damage done?

      The kind of men can only cause more divisions in this torn nation.

      Please go back to the archives of his artcles (say within last 12 months) that alone will bring you a clear view about the person- there you will not be able to findanything related to what FIDEL or any world revolutionist add, but PURE MALICE JEALOUSY issues based on personal agendas. If Sajith P would not be the successive leader for UNP, DJ can stay as it is now, as an another used condome. Actually, it is his own failure – maluwa nasinne kata nisai, he cut his neck by his own.

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    Birthday or not, let us go back to what you wrote at age 12: “I SAW THE HOLY LAND”
    Not ‘Visiting the Holy land’ or something like that which fellow students may be interested in, but bragging about what “I saw!” It presaged the trajectory of your utterly hypocritical life. A life declassified, indeed.

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      Agnos

      “Not ‘Visiting the Holy land’ or something like that which fellow students may be interested in, but bragging about what “I saw!” It presaged the trajectory of your utterly hypocritical life. A life declassified, indeed.”

      His experience sounds like Christopher Columbus discovering America as if the continent didn’t exist before his arrival.

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        Happy Birthday!

        While some of us disagree with your politics and those you support
        in the political landscape presently, there is little argument yours is a most unenviable track record. You have, at various times, worked closely both with blood-stained controversial leaders of the UNP as well the SLFP. More intriguingly, while your sympathies are with the Sinhala Left, you played a key role as a Minister in a Tamil insurrectionary outfit nonetheless.

        Your wide and impressive repertoire in Contemporary Political History is no substitute to the inconsistencies of your political infidelity. What may bring you comfort and satisfaction is the fact you are not alone in this shenaniganism.

        Kettikaran

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    Dayan

    Hearing all you intellectual wisdom I thought you were an atheist?
    Never read about quantum physics?

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    srinath.gunaratnam

    “Never read about quantum physics?”

    No never heard of it. Could you teach us the fundamentals of quantum physics.

    I heard some noises about Higgs boson. Please give us a brief lecture on Gods Particle.

    Could you also tell us the connection between Shiva’s cosmic dance and subatomic particles.

    Thanks.

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      Shiva’s cosmic dance : It is all bull shit.
      If you are not pulling my leg, start from watching a you tube video on double slit experiment! You will die an happy man.
      We it is not the kind of double slits you think!

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