20 March, 2019

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UK Govt. Had A Role In Crimes Against Humanity In 71 JVP Crushing: Declassified Documents Reveal

The UK government has declassified documents which were never published before that show that the UK had a covert role in helping to suppress the JVP uprising in 1971.

JVP-suspect

JVP suspect 1971

The documents were held at the national archives in Kew show that the UK’s covert role in helping to suppress the JVP uprising in 1971.

A new research by the Corporate Watch’s Phil Miller shows that the UK government was fully aware that the Government of Ceylon was “determined completely to destroy the movement and are prepared to use brutal and violent methods”.

Evidence of crimes against humanity was reported in western media at the time. An essay by Fred Halliday in 1971, citing The New York Times and Le Monde notes that:

“During the initial government counter-attack in Kegalle, around April 17–20th, the first reports began to appear of summary executions…[A Ceylonese] officer was quoted as saying: ‘Once we are convinced prisoners are insurgents we take them to the cemetery and dispose of them.’ The government subsequently denied this, but in later weeks hundreds of bodies of young men and women were seen floating down the Kelaniya river near Colombo, where they were collected and burnt by soldiers: many were found to have been shot in the back… What is clear is that the police and armed forces launched an indiscriminate attack on the peasant population as a whole”

We publish below the research sent to Colombo Telegraph by Phil Miller in full;

No Fire Zonebroadcast by Channel 4 on Sunday 3rd November, graphically depicted the civilian massacres which took place during Sri Lanka’s final offensive against the Tamil rebel-held territory in 2009. If David Cameron attends the Commonwealth summit in Colombo next week, critics say the Prime Minister will endorse the very same government responsible for those war crimes. In fact, Cameron follows a decades-long tradition of British prime ministers supporting repression on the island formerly called Ceylon.

The film covers the final 138 days of the Sri Lankan state’s 26-year counter-insurgency campaign against the separatist Tamil Tigers. In February 2009, during Gordon Brown’s premiership, Britain deployed two senior Belfast police officers to act as “critical friends” of the Sri Lankan security forces, only days after the PTK hospital was shelled (as featured in the film at 21:35).

This relationship starts long before however, just prior to the major pogrom of Tamils in July 1983 that ignited the conflict, when Sri Lankan police secretly visited the Royal Ulster Constabulary’s headquarters “to see at first hand the roles of the police and army in counter-terrorist operations”. Notably, the Sri Lankan police requested Thatcher’s help with “para-military [training] for counter-insurgency operations” and “commando operations training”. The FCO replied, “we should like to help the Sri Lankan Government (discreetly) as much as we can with these courses”. Most of the official records from this period remain classified. However, Chris Ryan, the SAS veteran turned author,claims that Sri Lanka’s elite police commando unit, the Special Task Force, was “formed in 1983 by a small team of SAS guys”.

This level of co-operation would not be unprecedented. Declassified documents (never before reported) reveal that Tory PM Edward Heath secretly sanctioned MI5 to provide counter-insurgency advice for crushing a left-wing youth uprising on the island in 1971. This experience cemented an Anglo-Lankan security partnership, which was to be the mid-wife of many repressive tactics later used against the Tamils. This untold history puts Cameron’s support for Sri Lanka in a disturbing new perspective.

1971: British counter-insurgency experts in Ceylon

In April 1971, an armed rebellion broke out in the former British colony of Ceylon. The island’s inexperienced leaders suddenly faced an uprising among thousands of disaffected rural youths, angry about unemployment and food shortages. Police stations were attacked by the JVP (translates as ‘People’s Liberation Front’), crudely armed with air rifles, shotguns and swords. The Prime Minister of Ceylon, Sirimavo Bandaranaike, panicked and declared a state of emergency. Over the next few months, the JVP rebellion was brutally suppressed. Thousands of rebels and civilians were killed by government forces and many more were captured and detained without trial for months. The torture of suspects was widespread.

Evidence of war crimes was reported in western media at the time. An essay by Fred Halliday in 1971, citing The New York Times and Le Monde notes that:

During the initial government counter-attack in Kegalle, around April 17–20th, the first reports began to appear of summary executions…[A Ceylonese] officer was quoted as saying: ‘Once we are convinced prisoners are insurgents we take them to the cemetery and dispose of them.’ The government subsequently denied this, but in later weeks hundreds of bodies of young men and women were seen floating down the Kelaniya river near Colombo, where they were collected and burnt by soldiers: many were found to have been shot in the back… What is clear is that the police and armed forces launched an indiscriminate attack on the peasant population as a whole [1].

UK government files, held at the national archives in Kew, southwest London show it too was aware that atrocities were taking place. A telegram from the British High Commission in Colombo to the FCO in London on 19th April noted that BBC News:

today carried a report of summary execution of insurgents by firing squad after interrogation. We have no reason to doubt the accuracy of this report which resulted from an interview with the military coordinating officer in Kegalle. Indeed it agrees with earlier reports we had heard of similar incidents.

The High Commission also noted on 20th April that the Ceylonese authorities “seem determined completely to destroy the movement and are prepared to use brutal and violent methods”.

Although several countries supplied Ceylon with weapons to help put down the uprising, the British High Commissioner in Colombo would later proudly reflect in a telegram that “what mattered most, however, were the small arms, ammunition, armoured vehicles and other material supplied by Her Majesty’s Government with quite remarkable speed and to decisive effect”. More drastic measures were contemplated, but ruled out for “technical and presentational reasons”. Alec Douglas-Home, then British Foreign Secretary, concluded that, “An alternative to the use of Napalm would be the machine guns supplied with the Bell Helicopters. You can tell this to the Ceylonese”.

 

Supplementing these arms deals were the British military, police and intelligence officers who secretly advised the Ceylonese on how to make best use of this equipment. The FCO insisted on a five day advisory mission from 21st April to 28th April. It selected Colonel Roger May, owing to his “experience of insurgency situations in a number of parts of the world” and Michael Macoun, the FCO’s Overseas Police Advisor, formerly Commissioner of Police in Uganda.

This degree of British involvement in Ceylon was obscured in the House of Commons on 6th May 1971. When asked “whether military personnel and advisers are being sent in addition to military equipment”, the defence minister said “The Ceylon Government has not requested the provision of any British military personnel or advisers to support this equipment”. The fact that Whitehall had already despatched two senior security advisers on its own initiative was concealed from the public.

MI5 also gave secret counter-insurgency advice to the Ceylonese authorities throughout the uprising – with Heath’s approval. Although MI5’s Security Liaison Officer (S.L.O.) in Ceylon had a “close and excellent” relationship with the Inspector General of Police, he seemed unwilling or unable to stop atrocities that they knew were taking place. In fact, Mrs Bandarainke was so impressed by MI5 that she even appointed one of their officers, Jim Patrick, who was stationed in the British High Commission in Colombo, as her government’s counter-insurgency expert, to “help train a few of their top Special Branch men”.

I showed these documents to Lord Avebury, who toured Ceylon in 1971 on behalf of Amnesty International. Regarding the UK’s covert role in helping to suppress the JVP uprising, Avebury said he “didn’t get any inkling of that at the time” [2]. Patrick also advised on the ‘rehabilitation’ of some 13,600 captured insurgents, who were interned in detention camps which Lord Avebury was refused access to during his visit[3].

Malaya

Patrick was regarded as suitable for this role because he had ten years experience of Special Branch work during the Malayan Emergency of 1948-1960, in which Britain crushed a Maoist anti-colonial movement. Half a million Chinese squatters had to be forcibly resettled in 500 ‘new villages’ to prevent the Maoist guerillas from living among the local population. Atrocities were widespread, such as the infamous massacre of 24 unarmed villagers by Scots Guards at Batang Kali in 1948, often referred to as ‘Britain’s My Lai’. Ironically, in 1970 it was Heath’s newly elected government that quashed an investigation into the incident, claiming there was insufficient evidence. Decades later it was revealed that those investigating had in fact obtained a confession from a soldier in the platoon, who said that a mass killing had been ordered [4]. The cover-up continued right up until 2012, when the FCO finally declassified files pertaining to the incident.

Special Branch was integral to British counter-insurgency strategy in Malaya, which has chilling implications for the appointment of Jim Patrick as Mrs Bandaranaike’s adviser. In his comprehensive book on the Malayan Special Branch, retired officer Leon Comber describes their role as “providing the army with operational intelligence on which counter-insurgency operations could be mounted”[5]. In other words, without Special Branch, the soldiers would have been shooting into the dark, regardless of how well armed they were. Gathering accurate intelligence about the enemy’s movements was vital for counter-insurgency campaigns, and Jim Patrick was suitably qualified to tell the Ceylonese exactly how best to do this.

Britain also ensured Ceylon had access to training facilities in Malaysia. Mr Macoun reported soon after his advisory visit to Ceylon that:

All consulted agreed that, once the situation is under control, a combined team of Senior Armed Services and Police officers should pay a work-study visit to Malaysia to examine counter-insurgency techniques… Advantage should also be taken of facilities for Police Riot Action training and Special Branch (Counter-Insurgency Warfare) techniques, likewise available in Malaysia…The Ceylon Police Force will continue to be in need of advice and assistance for some time and the excellent relations between the Inspector-General and his senior staff and the British High Commission (in particular, the Security Liaison Officer) should be sustained.

telegram between British diplomats in Colombo and Kuala Lumpur, dated 12th July, shows this experience was actively transferred:

Superintendent Kadigawa, Ceylon Police, will be attending Malaysian Special Branch Senior Basic Course 16 August to 6 November. Ceylon Inspector General would be grateful for facilities for Kadigawa to study all aspects of counter-insurgency after the course is finished, with the object of applying lessons learnt to situation here. 2. Kadigawa would be concerned with the whole field of counter-insurgency including resources for investigation, rehabilitation of detainees and protective security techniques. He would particularly welcome chance to see operations in the field.

The files also show a veritable shopping list that Mr Macoun had passed on to the Ceylonese Police in May 1971 shortly after his visit. It suggests a paramilitary approach to policing and public order, preparing the nascent Republic of Sri Lanka (formed in 1972) for a more uncompromising approach to future unrest.

a). Riot shields, b). Hand grenades, c). Flares, d). Automatic pistols, e). night-vision binoculars, f). arc-lights, g). loudhailer equipment, h). land rovers, I). patrol cars, j). centrifugal water pumps, k). mobile canteens, l) water bowsers

2. They should also like information about the availability and the cost of the following items:

a). Shorland armoured patrol car, b). Bren Machine Gun, c). Greener Mk 3 police gun and webley anti-riot gun, d). night sight trilux foresight, e). L1A1 individual weapons sight…j). lightweight body armour and helmet

Kenya and Bahrain

Britain’s colonial crimes in Kenya were also presented to the Ceylonese as a textbook example of successful counter-insurgency strategy. The High Commission in Nairobi sent over a reading list about Britian’s defeat of the Mau Mau in Kenya from 1953-1960. Notably, the Nairobi booklist included ‘The Hunt for Kimanthi‘, written by Ian Henderson, who was the Colonial Special Branch officer credited with capturing Kimanthi Dedan, the last surviving Mau Mau leader (he was hung by the British in 1957).

At that time, the British Commander-in-Chief of East Africa commented that “Ian Henderson has probably done more than any single individual to bring the Emergency to an end”. When the Colonial administration withdrew from Nairobi at Independence in 1963, thousands of incriminating files were burnt or dumped in the Indian Ocean. The remaining files lay hidden for years at a Foreign Office building in Hanslope Park, before a court case forced their disclosure in 2012. The FCO have finally agreed to pay £19.9 million pounds in compensation to 5,228 Kenyan claimants who suffered tortured or ill-treatment by the British Colonial forces during the Emergency. On the 6th June 2013, Foreign Secretary William Hague had to admit to the House of Commons what Britain’s treatment of the Mau Mau entailed:

Emergency regulations were introduced: political organisations were banned; prohibited areas were created and provisions for detention without trial were enacted. The colonial authorities made unprecedented use of capital punishment and sanctioned harsh prison so-called ‘rehabilitation’ regimes. Many of those detained were never tried and the links of many with the Mau Mau were never proven…The British Government recognises that Kenyans were subject to torture and other forms of ill treatment at the hands of the colonial administration.

However, Henderson’s skills were highly valued within the establishment. He was hand-picked by the FCO to lead Bahrain‘s Police Special Branch in 1966, where he remained their internal security chief until 1998 (Bahrain became independent from Britain in 1971). Henderson earned himself the moniker ‘Butcher of Bahrain’ among pro-democracy activists who credibly accused him of torture [e.g HRWAI]. For Whitehall, it was perfectly normal that Sheikh Khalifa of Bahrain should employ a former Kenyan Special Branch officer, just as it was acceptable for Mrs Bandarainke to use a former Malayan Special Branch as her counter-insurgency expert in Ceylon.

Still unknown

Britain’s covert intervention in Ceylon’s domestic affairs during 1971 was part of a pattern of post-colonial control over the island now called Sri Lanka. After Jim Patrick’s spell in Ceylon, an ex-MI5 Director Jack Morton visited Sri Lanka in 1979 to produce the ‘Morton report’, containing “practical recommendations for the total reorganisation of the intelligence apparatus” which was “at heart of any discussion on Special Branch” (Morton had been Director of Intelligence in Malaya).

The full extent of British counter-insurgency advice for Sri Lanka against the Tamils is still hidden behind the Public Records Act, which conveniently contains a ’30-year rule’ to firewall from public knowledge much of the small print about British foreign policy since 1983. However, there is enough evidence already available that shows the foundational role Britain played in creating an apparatus of mass repression on the island. This toxic legacy of British spooks in Sri Lanka should haunt David Cameron on his visit to Colombo next week.

[1] Halliday, Fred, pp 84-85, cites New York Times, April 25th 1971, and Le Monde, June 16th 1971.

[2] Email correspondence with author, 24th May 2013

[3] The full extent and precise content of MI5 advice on ‘rehabilitation’ and counter-insurgency is unavailable. Unlike most other central government departments, which must make their files publicly accessible after 30 years, MI5, (along with MI6, the Special Forces and Police Special Branch) never have to declassify their records. Dr Christopher Andrew, an historian who had access to the MI5 archives, alleges that “the files of SLO reports from New Delhi, as from most of the Empire and Commonwealth, were, alas, later destroyed because of a shortage of space in the Security Service Archives” (Andrews, Christopher, The Defence of the Realm – The Authorized History of MI5, p 947)

[4] Peng, Chin, My Side of History, pp 242-243

[5] Comber, Leon, Malaya’s Secret Police 1945-60, The Role of the Special Branch in the Malayan Emergency, p xix

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Latest comments

  • 0
    0

    well done CT on this scoop its top class journalism

    over to jim softly,k a sumanasekera ,ella ‘moda’ koll and he rest of the jokers who critizise CT saying its biased!

    or to malinda and rajpal who write to earn in order send thier kids to private schools (malinda) and to get laptops (rajpal)

    • 0
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      Certainly a good work by CT,

      yet should know in 1971 Ceylon was a dominion of Britain & even the charges against JVP’ ers in Ceylon Courts were ” trying to topple Her Majesty the Queens Govt” , no mention about democratically elected govt. of Mrs. B with 2/3rd majority in 1970.

      Of course we would see more classified info on 88/89 JVP insurrection as well

      • 0
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        Ye, more investigations going up to 1956,

        Martin Vickers, Conservative MP, UK:

        Clearly there has been genocide taken place in Sri Lanka and the International Community needs to take the issue much more seriously and investigations should take place.

        Source a video clip in English, above is a transcript by me from:

        http://www.tamilwin.com/show-RUmrzBSVMZit7.html

  • 0
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    Superb work CT indeed!

    At this rate, you will soon be the source of quality information pople go to on Sri Lankan affairs.

    If you are not that already.

    Cheers!

    PS: Frances Harrison & CH4 where are your damning documentaries on UK’s infamous covert roles around the world? Often amounting to war crimes.

    • 0
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      quality information? Are you nuts?

      First investigating into 71 is a good and it should be done but why now? at this moment that too is against Britian?

      had Britian did a boycott of CHOGM like Canada would CT be working on digging the UK involvement in 71?

      Ben, CT works with an agenda. Mahinda is a thug, nepotist, thief but not a war criminal.

      • 0
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        Sach,

        Your description of our “King” is rather precise. Very close to the reality.

        However, Mahinda’s problem is that he has to cover the backs of very senior people. Even of his own Bro GR.

        He might commit Harakiri trying to cover up crimes of other people.

        Rather, The King should show backbone by standing up for victims. Not for criminals. The guy does not get this, it seems. Coz’ he loves limelight he gets from the gallery.

        Meanwhile, cunning LTTE Die-Ass-Pora in the West has gone to town with it. Along with their selected Western agents.

        Cheers!

        • 0
          0

          anyway I can contact you?

    • 0
      0

      Ben,

      Please deal with what Channel 4 has exposed. Can you show that they fabricated the video and photos? Can you establish that they have unfairly accused Sri Lanka? If you cannot you better not comment on this otherwise you will make a fool of yourself!

      • 0
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        unfortunatley Ben is an anti govt fellow who finds fault with them for everything unless it concerns the minorities as he is another communal minded racist

        • 0
          0

          Peacelover,

          Ref my response to you on Abeynayake’s editorail.

          Cheers!

        • 0
          0

          Peacelover,
          Sorry i had to poke my nose here to correct you.
          Ben Hurling (right or wrong) a true patriat.
          He hates this regime and not a support of the present UNP either.
          He hates the dictatorship of this family and its corruption.
          He hates the BBS and its mentors.
          He hates descriminations and harassments towards the minorities, I have read here in CT that he raised his voice against those hate speakers and their speeches.
          Yet, that doesnt mean he support any pro-LTTE elements. Similarly anti-LTTE doesnt mean that you are against the Tamils.

          Like a true patriot he loves the country and its people, just like you and me do, irrespective of race, religion or the language.
          You luv your country doesnt mean that you love your regime or the govt.

      • 0
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        Burning Issue,

        The problem with CH4 and Frances Harrison is this.

        They do Cherry pick war crimes based on their agenda.

        You might be OK with that. I am not.

        Cheers!

        PS: Crimes documented on the video warrants a full investigation. It seems very credible crimes were infact committed. And criminals who ever they are must be punished swiftly. We don’t need motivated British journalists to tell us do something so simple.

        • 0
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          “They do Cherry pick war crimes based on their agenda.”

          It seems all your fingers are of the same size frogee.

          The world media controlled by the like of Murdoch the kangaroo (nee Greene the Fascist Jew) does not print that. Eg. the toy affair – the president of the largest toy importer in the world (Jewish) went over to China and apologized to the Chinese people not just the government but the western press never published it. Shock and Awe is another example-

        • 0
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          Ben

          You appear intelligent but playing dumb; why?

          Such programs have time constraint and they need to have maximum impact within this this timeframe what is wrong with cherry picking. What they have cherry picked clearly show the crimes committed by SLA. What else do you want! If you cannot deal with the charge, stop writing pure and simple. Stop wasting people’s time!

          • 0
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            Are you serious? bc cherry picking is certainly not justice and someone without an agenda would certainly not cherry pick.

          • 0
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            Burning,

            Crimes broadcasted on CH4 are indeed grave. Shameful to watch as citizen of this country. And as a fellow human being. Sri Lanka must at once get to the bottom of it. First and foremost, fot the sake of the innocent. And for justice. Even for the not so innocent victims.

            Even though no other nation after wining a war has done it, Sri Lanka must own up. And set an example for UK & USA to follow. War is an extremely bloody affair. There is no reason to hideaway.

            Failure to do so will be an X’mas gift to enemies of Sri Lanka. Who will use, misuse & abuse such failures to the maximum. Who of course do not give a damn about human lives. Be they Tamil or Sinhalese. For they are driven by an extremely ethno-nationalistic pipe dream.

            PS: Wish you very good luck with your blind faith in Western media. In a post-Wikileaks, post-Snowden world, your confidence in Western media seeems extraorinarily stupid.

            Please note it is routine of intelligence services to infiltrate media & aid groups. Even ICRC is infiltrated. Besides, so called independent media houses in the West are nothing but corporations. Their owners & handlers often invisible.

            Cheers!

    • 0
      0

      Good people, this is all well and good but it is just confirmation of a lot of what we knew in 1971 as the action took place. What we have now is simply the papers declassified by the British government under the 30 year rule and hardly the staff of a major scoop. In 1971, when Siramavo called for assistance, not only did the British, but also the governments of many other countries rushed to help SL. Especially when the uprising was identified as marxist! So the latest revelations are really for the historians to update the text books.

      More pressing is the matter at hand. Will the present government of SL succeed in the forthcoming exercise; entertaining the leaders of one-third of this planet, feeding them kiribath, kavun and thala-guli, and pleading ‘let bygones be bygones, and can we all live in peace and harmony now (and please send more tourist to enjoy our legendary hospitality. Thank You very much for coming.)

      OR will the visitors show bad taste and raise THE questions that MaRa and his regime DON’T want hear?

  • 0
    0

    Duplicity of post colonial era. This is terrible and how could the British of all people could massacre civilians and then preach human rights to the third world?

    • 0
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      Babsy, where were you at the time? I didn’t hear you plead for the human rights of the many policemen who were killed by the JVP on the 5th April and immediately after. The Brits only followed normal procedure in helping a friendly government in time of trouble. After all when Sirimavo, widow of Solomon WEST RIDGEWAY Dias Bandaranaike (that’s right, named after the famous British Governor Sir Joseph West Ridgeway) called for help it was only natural to repay the work done by the Bandaranaike clan for the colonial masters over the many years of colonial rule. Nothing duplicitous about that.

      • 0
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        Spring Koha

        “many policemen who were killed by the JVP on the 5th April and immediately after.”

        Could you tell us as to the number of policeman who were killed by the JVP in that period? Where were they killed and how the JVP dispose the bodies?

        • 0
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          You ask questions that would involve a history lesson.

          The number of police killed in that period; and where they were killed?

          Ofcourse I couldn’t count them all (we couldn’t get far out of our ‘town’ in the deep south….) but let us say that the authorities were economical with the numbers while the JVP comrades were willing to quote more flattering figures.

          I cannot speak for the whole island but, suffice to say, that I cannot recollect a single police station that was held by police after the 5th April in a southern area from (loosely) Balangoda to Buttala down to Tissa and Tangalle. Certainly, Wellawaya, Kataragama, Deniyaya and many stations in the Uda Walawe area did suffer fatal losses. I did see many bodies but I did not keep count.

          But I can still see the ghosts of those poor men as I drive through some of the southern towns.

          How did the JVP dispose of the bodies?

          That seems a bit of a silly question to me. If you were there you would have know that the JVP were executioners NOT undertakers.

          And we were so shit scared we didn’t wait to help with the burials or partake of the dana’s.

          Later on we saw the Sirima/GOSL reply; whoa! Thousands. Impressive. But, just in case you ask, they didn’t bury either.

          That was yet another pestilential damnation that befell this beautiful island of ours.

          Keep your axe sharp, Native Vedda!

          • 0
            0

            Native Vedda,

            By the way, I often think that all these centuries of conflict etc etc etc between these invading tribes from the north would never have happened if only you and you fellow men – the true native inhabitants of this piece of gondwanaland – had resorted to a bit of urgent action and put your axes to good use instead of falling asleep on the job and scratching your………

            Same goes for your mates in the other bit of Gondwanaland down under. What were they thinking of when the saw Cook and his men?

  • 0
    0

    CT

    Congratulation.

    Thanks

    Now please find out what role did UK and USA play in the war against JVP between 1987 and 1991?

    Can we have an independent investigation into war crimes and crimes against humanity committed from 5th April 1971 to date?

  • 0
    0

    Oh yea CT you are great, same UK Govt helped genocide against Tamils and supported Sinhala Buddhist genocide against Tamils….u CT great….

    • 0
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      J.Muthu

      Who do think have been responsible for the genocide of my people?

      • 0
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        Come on Native you know better, Brits gave all the powers to Monkeys called Sinhala Buddhist, if you look back their history they love blood and violence. Sadly your people and mine suffered immensely. Hope When we liberate our land your people move our peaceful jungles, play with your beloved all animals and again monkeys as well…

        • 0
          0

          J.Muthu

          ” Sadly your people and mine suffered immensely.”

          in the hands of your people and Sinhala/Buddhists.

          “When we liberate our land your people move our peaceful jungles, play with your beloved all animals and again monkeys as well…”

          Let me get this right.

          You want to liberate your land from Sinhala/Buddhists and share it with my people.

          Hang on a sec.

          It is our land that I want to liberate from both of you and do want to share it with my people.

          Neither your people nor the Sinhalese will have a place in this island’s future. Please count yourself and your brethren out of the equation.

  • 0
    0

    USA, USSR, PRC, UK ,Yugoslavia and India with and number of other countries assisted United Front government of Ceylon to suppress the insurgents. PRC offered financial assistance , others military assistance. Later PRC empowered the navy by giving some military boats.

  • 0
    0

    Who cares?

    Muslim community NEVER resorted to violence and that is why we have grown.

    Modaya Tamils and Modaya Sinhalese fought against the army and got JUST DESSERTS.

    Who cares!

    • 0
      0

      Therefore you desperately trying to get Muslims involved in some kinds of violence.
      So far you, Gota, BBS, Champuka, Aswer, Paisa Mustappa, Hisbulla have failed.

      Why dont you give up that idea once and for all.

    • 0
      0

      Hi Fathima Fukushima,
      I am Zahira Boy, your Anandian will be recruted in Casinos. Well look what Sinhalaya doing, 1970 1989, sinhala killed Sinhala, imagine what you would have done to Tamils? dont chck the patience with Muslims, when Jihad comes out then All Fukushima will be fuck shima…

  • 0
    0

    Good old days : when the country was Ceylon and we were Ceylonese…Singapore, India, Burma, Malaysia etc envious of Ceylon

    We were respected all over the world. You just have to say I am a Ceylonese…
    it was so mystique

    The day we became Sri Lanka and Sri Lankan …down hill all the way

  • 0
    0

    Congrats CT

    No wonder why GB, Australia and New Zealand wants to attend.

    They want pick the Crumbs left over after feeding China Economy. They are no better than the Saffron Robed Ones.

    Human Rights are not only a problems for Minorities but for all sri Lanka.

    When will K.s. Max, Fuks etc realise. May be it s their bread.

    levi

    Levi.

    • 0
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      Levi

      “Human Rights are not only a problems for Minorities but for all sri Lanka.”

      Exactly.

      This is what I have been trying to tell the stupid Tamils and stupid Sinhalese.

      There has been a huge need to revisit the idea of “Nation Building”.

  • 0
    0

    There is nothing new in this CT – article.

    Everybody knows that every western govt helped to eradicate JVP. But, non of the Western govts helped to eradicate LTTE.

    IT was simply the POLITICS.

    • 0
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      JimSofty

      “Everybody knows that every western govt helped to eradicate JVP. But, non of the Western govts helped to eradicate LTTE.”

      Hang in there for another 30 years, you might find explosive revelation about UK, US and Indian involvement directly or indirectly in the war crimes committed by Sri Lanka on its own people from 5th April 1971 to date.

    • 0
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      JimSofty,
      Gotabaya must know more than you do, that US helped the SLG destroy LTTE.

      In his own words,

      “Between 2006 and 2008 we destroyed 12 of these floating armouries.”
      “The Americans were very, very helpful. Most of the locations of these ships were given to us by the Americans,”

      American satellite technology located the ships and enabled the Sri Lankans to hit them.

      In addition to destrying the ships, US arrested LTTE supporters while buying anti-aircraft missiles by using undercover agents. US also imprisoned 34 LTTE supporters and several are still in US prisons.

      US preaches non-violent methods to win freedom. If non-violent democratic agitation does not resolve the ethnic problem in Sri Lanka what will US preach next time if there is an armed rebellian in Sri Lanka?

  • 0
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    ” What is clear is that the police and armed forces launched an indiscriminate attack on the peasant population as a whole ”

    This does not stand to reason. The JVP insurgency had little to do with the peasants. The university graduates from both Colombo and Peradeniya found to their great dismay that at the end of their studies no jobs awaited them. Hence the rebellion. The death toll estimated as high as 60,000, of educated Sinhala youth was a great loss to the land which was going through bad economic times. Those who could, migrated in numbers, while others had to stay and suffer the terror as it unfolded. It is a surprise that the UK government had helped contain the violence then, but when it mattered even more, with the Tamil terrorists it attempted to disuade the government from controlling them. The latter group of terrorists should have been annhilated at the very start just as the JVP was.

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      ram

      “The JVP insurgency had little to do with the peasants.”

      Were they insurgents or terrorists?

      “It is a surprise that the UK government had helped contain the violence then, but when it mattered even more, with the Tamil terrorists”

      Hang in there for another 30 years, you might find explosive revelation about UK, US and Indian involvement directly or indirectly in the war crimes committed by Sri Lanka on its own people from 5th April 1971 to date.

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