23 October, 2018

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Colombo International School Homophobic Bullying Saga: Victimised Student Goes Public – Activists Commend

Special Coverage by Colombo Telegraph Editorial Team –

Saakya Rajawasan, the student at Colombo International School who was subjected to blatantly homophobic bullying. “Saakya has issued a highly informative, diplomatic, dignified and in all senses of the term, an absolutely first-class public statement, said Dr Chamindra Weerawardhana.

Speaking to Colombo Telegraph Dr Weerawardhana said: “This statement, I believe, is a historic statement, made by a young Sri Lankan in public, for the very first time. This letter is an absolute eye-opener to many Sri Lankans stuck in Victorian conservatisms and colonial hangovers of ‘sticking to’ almighty rules. Future generations of non-cisnormative and non-heteronormative Sri Lankans and allies, and every Sri Lankan who stands for the fundamental rights and equality of all Sri Lankans will look up to the name Saakya Rajawasan, and take pride of this groundbreaking young pioneer who stood up, boldly, unbowed and unafraid, for the rights of all Sri Lankans in the SOGIESC spectrum”.

“I believe that the liberal LGBT+ rights organisations and individuals who initially sought to downgrade the entire issue, and ignored Saakya’s plight, will now desperately seek to capitalise upon Saakya, and ‘use’ her story for their advantage. We as intersectional gender justice activists will categorically condemn any such advances from LGBT+ NGOs and liberal LGBT+ leadership aspirants, and will call them out, vehemently”, Dr. Weerawardhana further added.

We publish below the statement issued by Saakya Rajawasan, with her permission, and with the consent of her father:

At the beginning of her statement, Rajawasan notes: 

My name is Saakya Rajawasan and I am a final year student at CIS. This is my statement about recent events which lead me to be given demerits, detention and be banned from all extracurricular school activities. I am also being threatened with suspension despite my excellent academic record. Three years ago I left a local school to join CIS. I was very happy because I thought CIS would be a far more progressive environment. [emboldened emphasis ours]. 

This statement points at a harsh reality in the schooling system of Sri Lanka, where strict conformity to an outdated, colonially-imposed cis-hetero-normativity is expected from ALL pupils. There is a long way to go in changing such dogmatic structures and creating a modern schooling system that is welcoming and inclusive. 

Rajawasan then narrates the exact incidents of intolerance, and visibly, homophobia and violent disposition of teachers towards herself, which we quote below in full:  At that time I asked for permission to wear trousers instead of the girls’ uniform. I identify as bi-sexual and gender-fluid so wearing trousers is a way of expressing myself. Additionally, wearing trousers instead of a skirt gives me more freedom of movement, and protection from dengue. The school administration told me that changes in the uniform system were unlikely.

It goes without saying that the Colombo International School’s uniform policy is extremely archaic for a cosmopolitan and internationally-oriented school. The school’s attitude negates the reason why Rajawasan wanted to join CIS in the first place – assuming that “CIS would be a far more progressive environment.” This series of incidents has clearly demonstrated that CIS is just as socially conservative and repressive as the rest of the schools in Sri Lanka when it comes to non-cisnormative and non-heteronormative Students. 

The section below is extremely heart-rending. It shows us the story from the perspective of Ms Rajawasan’s young classmates – a side of the story that is often ignored. The fact that many female students did not want to try wearing trousers to school “in fear of parental anger or school punishment” shows how pathetically schools [including CIS] police children’s and young people’s attire unnecessarily: A year later I started wearing trousers as I feel most comfortable and myself in them. When I wore the trousers, I always wore it respectfully, as I considered it a privilege to do so. My classmates were very supportive. In fact, several female students voiced envy at my increased mobility, but none followed my example, fearing parental anger or school punishment.

It is also worth asking how many pupils assigned male at birth were uneasy with the uniform assigned to them, but kept quiet for “fear of parental anger and school punishment”. The uniform rules in schools, we believe should be and should only be pupil-friendly. Forcibly imposing a uniform on a child based solely on their gender assigned at birth is an outdated and violent practice that needs to change. 

Rajawasan then adds that: At end of this July the school administration informed me that I was qualified to become a prefect. However they said they couldn’t give me the position because I wear the boys’ uniform even though I’m a girl. They said that if I wore the skirt, I could become a prefect. I replied, “I’m honored to be considered for the position, but I won’t give up my trousers or my identity.” Conservative voices may define LGBTQ+ only as a sexual choice, but at my age, it’s much more about identity and I believe wearing trousers asserts my identity.

When we said at the beginning of this Special Coverage that future generations will fondly look up to the name ‘Saakya Rajawasan’, this is why. 

We have nothing but respect, admiration and appreciation for Rajawasan’s response to this Victorian brand of uniform violence. If we read the logic behind Colombo International School’s policy on appointing prefects and training students for leadership, it is not a young person’s merits, achievements, leadership acumen, personality, multi-tasking skills and all-rounder potential that are important when being elevated as a school prefect, but whether they wear the uniform in a strictly cis-hetero-normative way, based on what – according to birth registration documentation – is supposed to be between their legs. 

Right on, Colombo International School! 

If Colombo International School has no intention of being reduced to the laughing stock of international higher education bodies and world class universities that often head-hunt for the best talent from elite schools, then its management and teachers have a great deal of homework to do, urgently, in order to get up-to-date with policies of best practice when dealing with non-cisnormative and non-heteronormative young people. 

Rajawasan then moves on to explain how a fashion show did not have a place for one of the most highly respected flags in the world, the rainbow flag that symbolises, life, equality, justice and peace:  This September CIS had its fashion show, a very important event, especially for graduating seniors. I wanted to wear a rainbow cape as a symbol of pride and solidarity. The school told me that I couldn’t since people might get offended and the school couldn’t endorse a political statement. The next day I gave them new designs for the cape, including a multi colored tie-dye pattern which is obviously not a political symbol and would have offended no one. I was willing to compromise with the school and would have been ok wearing any of my other designs. The school rejected all of my compromises. A few days later l was banned from getting on stage at the fashion show.

Having no purpose for my rainbow cape I draped it on my bag. The head of sixth form came up to me and said, “Please remove the flag,” several times. I politely smiled and said, “Sorry sir, I can’t,” each time. Then he asked me to tuck it in so that it looked like a bag cover, which I did. He returned with the acting principal, who again asked me to remove the flag. I replied, “Sorry, I can’t.”

This again is yet another reason why future generations of Sri Lankans will look up to Saakya Rajawasan, and why Saakya has already marked an historic precedent. 

Readers ought to ask themselves this question: “How many young people Saakya’s age would have the world view, cosmopolitan outlook, understanding of fundamental rights issues, and simply, the courage to stand up to injustice imposed in a context of high power imbalance [teacher/school authority vs. pupil]?” 

This ought to be followed by yet another important question: “In order to develop as a modern nation with sound, accountable and transparent institutions, with critically-thinking citizens who stand boldly for equality and justice, or simply, for Sri Lankans to move beyond the servile and ‘yes wo/men’ syndrome that is all too rampant at all levels, what’s the kind younger generation we need to raise? 

The answer to the first question is very likely to be “not many”. 

The answer to the second question, one can proudly affirm, is “a younger generation that draws inspiration from Saakya Rajawasan”. 

Speaking to the Colombo Telegraph, Thiagaraja Warathas, a lecturer in International Politics at the University of Colombo, former Rotary Scholar at Uppsala University and currently Commonwealth PhD Fellow at the University of Bath, noted: “Conservative gender norms that uphold male superiority and demonise anything that does not conform with this patriarchal view of the world, is the basis upon which majority of the students in schools who do not confirm with cis-hetero-normative gender and sexual behaviour are being bullied, harassed, tortured and punished. In fact this is a major reason behind the high school-drop-out rates of trans and gender-non-conforming people in the country. It is precisely because of this kind of discrimination, imposed by teachers like Sara Philipps and Vinod Senadheera that many people from the LGBTIQI+ community lack a proper education. This is a case of using non-cis-hetero-normativity as a tool in preventing a student from benefitting from education and other school activities enjoyed by students who conform. It is inhumane to discriminate against a young person in an educational institution based on their looks and how they diverge from stereotypical conservative gender roles and expressions”. 

Warathas further added: “CIS should come out and explain what is their official policy towards students who do not conform to cis-hetero-normative gender norms and expressions. Clearly the actions of CIS so far and the school’s deliberate silence indicate that CIS is yet another ‘cis’ and hetero-patriarchal school where teachers discriminate against students because they are different. For as long as this is the case, CIS will never be able to live up to the standards expected from a cosmopolitan international school”. 

Rajawasan then explains the bullying imposed by school teachers upon her. We understand that Sarah Phlipps and Vinod Senadheera are the teachers responsible for this daylight homophobic bullying. Some may describe this as ‘disciplinary action’, but we resolutely refuse to use that description, simply because a disciplinary violation has NOT taken place here. If CIS wants to present itself as an urban, cosmopolitan, internationally-oriented, modern school which caters to the best higher educational institutions in the world and is intent upon producing global citizens, its attitude towards Saakya Rajawasan can only be described as counter-productive, and even worse, blatantly homophobic, amounting to a shameless brand of cis-hetero-normative bullying: They [school management] gave me the option of either removing the flag or them taking my whole bag. I handed them the bag with the flag still on it. They considered this to be rude. Later I heard rumors that I threw the bag, which I did not do. I was brought up to yield when necessary but never to bow my head. The next day my father, Dinesh Rajawasan, a 1983-90 initial adopter of CIS, was hand-delivered the infamous letter, which claimed I was guilty of “unacceptable and irresponsible behavior.” He promptly framed and hung in our house titled, “Patriarchy’s Willing Executioners.” ( referencing Daniel Goldhagen)

The decision of Rajawasan’s father, who saw right through the problem, and defended his daughter’s rights, is highly commendable. Mr Rajawasan sets a tremendously valuable precedent to all parents, especially to Sri Lankan parents, who, more often than not, are inclined to penalise their children and avoid looking at the systemic issues involved. 

The Colombo International School then descends to a record low: The school had further banned me from all extra-curricular activities. On the day of the school anniversary (September 29th) I had to deliver food to the environmental stall, as I had agreed to do so previously. I knew that I couldn’t attend the anniversary but I still needed to honor my responsibility. When I tried to make the delivery, security stopped me at the gate. The security guard took me to the principal who showed me the letter again.

What follows is the most pathetic part, and it is due to this that some gender justice activists believe that the Colombo International School must take firm disciplinary action against the teachers who took the decision to bully an innocent pupil. This would have been the case had this occurred in the UK or in any other country with strict codes of conduct and best practice in education. 

In speaking about the urgent action that the Colombo International School must take, Thiagaraja Warathas noted: “Not only the teachers, but the administrative hierarchy that condoned this terrible treatment of Saakya must be held accountable. The least they could do is to admit the trauma and harm they caused to an innocent student, and also admit that their actions infringed the student’s dignity. These are major failures from a school, which must definitely and promptly be redressed.  The school must lift all the punishments and sanctions against Saakya, and grant her the prefectship. The school must then make a full and public apology to Saakya and to her family. It is also very important to issue a further public guarantee that no such discrimination against non-cisnormative and non-heteronormative pupils will ever occur again.  The school should also publicise its policy towards inclusive learning with regard to gender non-conforming students. And of course, Saakya must be allowed wear trousers to school”. [Emphasis added]. 

The worst effect of centuries of colonisation and dominance by vicious forces such as Victorian [non]value systems are that of making people feel helpless, and ‘flattened’, if they do not conform to the colonially imposed rules. Here, a young Sri Lankan is being subjected to bullying, for having done absolutely nothing wrong. She is then left with no option but to ‘apologize’ for no reason. This is the most shameless part of this entire episode – the school making an otherwise excellent, forward-thinking and critically-minded pupil to ‘apologise’ for no reason. This is a gaslighting technique, practised in all forms of colonisation and domination for centuries – making those victimised by repression apologise. To quote Rajawasan: I didn’t say much; I just apologized. I don’t want them to think I was being rude or trying to break the rules. The security then escorted me to the gate and made sure I left the school. Being escorted off school premises like a criminal felt very dehumanizing. 

Rajawasan then adds: Personally, teachers and the acting principal were supportive but they still have their “job to do.” This feels like cognitive dissonance to me because teachers and the acting principal have always told us that they will support us in our choices, but when I most needed their support, they were unable to give it to me.

The “job to do” excuse is a non-excuse, and is another example of the clear lack of any social and gender justice-related knowledge among the school management. Open-minded parents who pay high amounts of money to educate their children in schools of this nature ought to check how well-versed school managements are, when it comes to their understanding of the concepts of equality, justice, systemic discrimination, safeguarding and inclusion. 

In reality, it is very clear that the Chairperson of CIS, Armyne Wirasinha, Acting Principal Sarah Philipps and the Sixth Form teacher Vinod Senadheera were NOT in any way supportive of Saakya Rajawasan. They bullied her and ostracised her from the school for one reason – for being a non-cisnormative and non-heteronormative young person who defied the school’s outdated Victorian conservatisms which have no place whatsoever in present-day Sri Lanka or for that matter, in any modern society. 

The latter part of the letter is compulsory reading to anyone and everyone in the field of education. We reproduce the latter section of her statement in full:  Additionally, I believe that my stand is important not just for me but for coming generations of CIS students. This Huffington Post article states that there is an increase in productivity of around 25% when closeted people are able to come out. Being supported in my choices by my father and my friends was a strong factor in my near perfect examination results. Closeted people spend so much of their time and energy building a lie that they often cannot achieve their full potential. Being allowed to be myself has given me the strength to be an exceptional student. I can only hope for the same kind of support for future LGBTQ+ students that CIS will undoubtedly either consciously or unconsciously be admitting

The above is a universal truth. Non-cisnormative and non-heteronormative people thrive in their lives when they are given the opportunity to be themselves and when they are treated with basic human dignity. That is the least that an educational institution can and should do. Every single education professional in Sri Lanka, in the United Kingdom [because Acting Principal Sarah Philipps who signed off the letter of shame sent to Saakya’s parents threatening suspension, is a British citizen, and a graduate of the University of Bath], and for that matter, everywhere else, ought to take this reality strongly into account. 

Rajawasan then rightly affirms: In fact, if CIS aims to assist students in prospering in international universities where issues of gender identity and sexual orientation are treated with great liberality, it is essential that the school prepare students for those conversations and climates. Pretending that various sexual identities and orientations do not exist does not serve students who will invariably be forced to confront these realities in foreign contexts.

One can only hope that the Colombo International School will take Ms Rajawasan’s wise words seriously, and, in line with guidelines already developed by organisations such as Stonewall UK, develop a strong SOGIESC Student Safeguarding Policy. This, and this alone, is the advisable action that CIS can and must definitely pursue. The fault in this story is with the Colombo International School and its management, and NOT with Saakya Rajawasan. 

Rajawasan then notes: I want to deeply thank everyone who has supported me. The outpouring of support has been so heart-warming and heartening. I believe it will mean a great deal to closeted young people who might be watching. I believe that we, together, are on the right side of history.

I have always been proud to represent CIS and know that together we can create positive change. As Martin Luther King said, “The arc of history bends towards justice.” India has already overturned its colonial era law against homosexuality. It is only a matter of time before LGBTQ+ rights are taken seriously in Sri Lanka. I hope CIS joins us in this important matter.

I firmly believe that if outdated rules are not challenged, society does not advance. People always need to break from the status quo before society evolves. Until Kathrine Switzer broke the rules and ran the Boston marathon in 1967 it was illegal for women to run marathons. Until American women protested in mass and were incarcerated for it, it was illegal for women to vote. My own stand is obviously a tiny step compared to those of these heroic women, however, I stand by my dedication to my own identity and choices.

The final paragraph is highly inspiring and important. Future generations of Sri Lankans will look up to the name Saakya Rajawasan, for her pioneering resistance to social conservatisms, for her courageous stance to be herself in a school where the management happened to be stuck somewhere in Victorian times. Colonial hangovers are such that many Sri Lankans still view childcare, primary, secondary and tertiary education, gender justice, SOGIESC rights in a socially conservative lens. 

The tide, however, is turning in favour of inclusive social and gender justice. The Indian Supreme Court’s recent decisions to repeal Sections 377 and 497 of the Indian Penal Code have created a highly favourable climate in the South Asian region for an enhanced discourse on fundamental rights for all. In Sri Lanka’s efforts to repeal Section 365 of the Sri Lankan Penal Code and include constitutional protections to all Sri Lankans irrespective of SOGIESC-related matter, the name ‘Saakya Rajawasan’ will be a name to remember, and an inspiration to many, especially to the younger generation.

Related stories: 

Colombo International School Violates Fundamental Rights of a Pupil, published on 3rd October 2018. 

Shame on You, Colombo International School, by Dr Chamindra Weerawardhana, published on 4th October 2018. 

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Latest comments

  • 24
    40

    Brilliant response by a young, intelligent girl, who has very respectfully given her side of the story. It’s a shame that a school as “prestigious” as CIS, holds back on a prefectship based on ones attire, condones freedom of expression at a fashion show and then reprimands her for bringing the rainbow flag to school. Also, kudos to her dad for his unstinting support and modern day parenting.

    • 0
      0

      all issues touched upon may be true for some of you, but please open your eyes to even more fundamental issues:
      .
      https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/08/world-leaders-have-moral-obligation-to-act-after-un-climate-report
      .
      also on the political front in our country, there’s naked racism once more raising its head. You may not even understand on which side I am:
      .
      https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/statement-on-resurgence-of-ltte-vijayakala-arrested-and-released-on-bail/
      .
      Few of us have respect for Dayan J’s integrity, but we cannot deny him intelligence.

    • 27
      3

      The school has no option but to obey the law. Look at the converse: what if CIS encouraged LGBT awareness? Most likely there would have been an equivalent furore, and the school would have been in plenty of trouble with the authorities for its failure to uphold the law.

      Also a little cynical about this issue. It stems from the fact that this child/parent has elected to promote a hot topic that will garner sympathy in countries that recognise this issue. The child is likely (I am unsure so we must inquire) to apply to universities in those very same countries. Is this an attempt to stand out from the multitudes? Nothing wrong with it mind you. See this excerpt from Blackish:
      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aiEwVFRU8IU

    • 7
      3

      Is it just me or does no one find Ironic that we impose a dresscode/ uniform forcefully,
      Then call it our culture?

      Cheers for Saakya for challenging something that should have been challenged decades ago, when Uniforms were introduced as fake solution for discrimination.

      There is no scientific evidence to prove that school uniforms have reduced discrimination in anyway, this whole situation is proof that instead of reducing discrimination it has increased it significantly!!

  • 22
    40

    Absolutely perfect!
    What a masterpiece rebuttal to a pompous school and old fashioned ‘values”
    Sure, this will go down in history – and so it should.

    • 43
      16

      Hans Upyours,

      Please note that the school system is a place for everyone to study in peace, and not a place for LGBT+s weirdos to exert their power.

      We send our normal children to these schools and we don’t want them to be influenced by these modern madness to change the God given gender with hormones and ‘nip and tuck’ operations. You might call me ignorant and old fashioned, but I know I am not, and I only speak common sense and decency.

      Honestly we have had enough of this nonsense and learn to respect the rights of others than LGBTS+ nuts too. What the LGBT+s need is psychological treatment, not the right of men to dress as women.

      Hope you get the point.

      • 20
        17

        A school is a place for everyone to study. LGBT “weirdos” included, not for people you assume are normal or not

        If a former principal is such a jerk to a child who is need of understanding no wonder the country is such a shithole with cultural idealist. A culture is what we choose not what you choose for us.

        • 7
          6

          Lex

          A school is a place for everyone to study. LGBT “weirdos” included, not for people you assume are normal or not

          The teacher has teach not the student, the doctor has to treat the patient not
          the patient to treat the doctor. the teacher is an experts trained for social responsibility encourages students to become better human beings.

          • 7
            5

            rbh,
            what is a doctor suppose to do? a doctor can’t treat your ignorance.

            In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association remove homosexuality from the DSM.

            World Health Organization (WHO) removed homosexuality from its ICD classification with the publication of ICD-10 in 1992.

            2018 – in India college of psychiatrist
            https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/homosexuality-not-an-illness-indian-psychiatric-society/article24401307.ece

          • 7
            6

            rbh,

            A Teacher can learn from a student. Good teachers do.
            A Doctor can learn from a patient. All doctors do.

            Teachers of CIS are not experts they are simple people with some degree most of the time even not related to the subject they teach.

            • 3
              4

              Lex

              A Teacher can learn from a student. Good teachers do.

              A teacher is a teacher after learning from everybody and when they qualified then we have to listen to the teacher.

              A Doctor can learn from a patient. All doctors do.

              After doctors learn from patients & Accident wards they are tested and become doctors then we listed to them

              ALL are Expert in all ways there are things to learn from student and raise object when there is a different agenda like the mother.

              In this case the teacher knows or learnt the history this student for what direction is the student upto.

              • 5
                3

                rbh it is clear to me you are not a professional.

                Professionals keep learning all their lives learning, learning never ends.
                You don’t suddenly pass out University and become a all knowing Doctor or Teacher.(Non of them score 100/100 in their exams) and there are lots of exams that increase knowledge little by little. So no Doctors don’t end their learning from patients when they get license and teachers don’t end learning when they get some qualification to teach in a school

                Even professors sometimes learn new things from their students. being an expert normally means you are aware of what you don’t know and what you know more that knowing everything there is to know about a subject.

                For a teacher to be aware of LGBT issues they should either have studied the matter at academic level or learnt it through a LGBT person(like what is happening now, this kid is educating Sri Lankans about their right to exist)

                Please learn more about society and how it works before you form extreme opinions against people.

      • 4
        4

        what a nasty person . You sound like a Nazi. All people should be treated with respect, irrespective of race, religion, ethnicity, language, or sexual orientation. Who the hell are you to call these people weirdo, just because they were born gay. A generation ago whites used to call people like us savages and not equal, is that also right? This country is full of people who want to hate and discriminate others on the basis of ethnicity , language, religion , caste and sexual orientation with politicians and religious leaders and many other encouraging this hatred, for their own personal benefit. No wonder it is regressing , whilst other nations including India are progressing. People who are gay bisexual or transgender do not choose this life style understood , they are born like this and have no choice. This has always been occurring in nature not only amongst humans but in other animals. Go and get a life instead of sewing hatred. It is you who is a uneducated bigoted weirdo. This girl should be applauded for her bravery . I wish I had a child who was as brave as this . Yes in Australia , like the vast majority of the population(80%) I voted for legalising same sex relationships. You can call me all sorts of names for this but I am proud of this.

        • 0
          0

          sorry sowing instead of sewing

    • 13
      6

      All this public hoo-ha is not going to do any good for the student. No other school in the counntry will touch her with a barge-pole now.
      It is ok to be “non-cis-normative” .(can’t these activists coin better words?) . But as in the case of, let us say, nymphomaniacs, it is better not to take such tendencies to school.
      I believe the apparent absence of a mother is a pointer to the roots of the situation.
      On the other hand, if Muslim girls are allowed to wear trousers, why not others?

      • 6
        4

        Old-codger,

        “if Muslim girls are allowed to wear trousers, why not others?” – Good question. If you
        question Muslim girls, “why are you wearing trousers?” – There is an answer that is acceptable in SL. But the response Saakya Rajawasan can give is (still) unacceptable in SL – That is the whole issue here.

      • 2
        1

        old codger

        On the other hand, if Muslim girls are allowed to wear trousers, why not others?

        You never know what motivates you. thats why you Get the permission first the go ahead, If house door is open it is not saying all can go in the outsider must get permission.like an open window, should be screened to keep the bugs out.

    • 4
      1

      Hans, your ‘absolutely perfect masterpiece rebuttal’ has been drafted and promoted by the Chamindra the Witch. Can’t you see that?

  • 19
    3

    Ouuuuuh, this article oozes from extreme pathetic statements.
    First of all, it would have been more helpful to print the full statement of this girl instead of interrupting it with other comments. I got confused in finding out about who is talking here right now.
    Second thing is, all this complications could have probably been avoided if the dress code would include trousers for girls also. School uniforms are not bad altogether. They stop pupils with low family income from being bullied by pupils that have rich parents which can always afford the latest fashion trends.
    Although, I principally appreciate the efforts of this young girl, as what she tries to achieve is normality to parts of the world for quite some time and to me it is a standard and totally normal experience, she should have been aware of the possible reaction of her school. There is a dress code in this school and she accepted it joining the school. Right or wrong in a modern world is another question, but the current discussion was programm by her dressing behaviour. Also, Sri Lanka is not the most progressive country what alternative sex and genders are concerned, so she could not have been surprised about the reactions she faced. I believe, being an intelligent person, she is described as, she knew very well what she was doing and the consequences this would arise.
    One thing however I consider to be very important. The country should develop regarding this matter. It is definitely not in the position to sift out sexually differently oriented high-performers from its educational system. It would mean a great loss for the country’s economic potentials. Showing no progress in this matter will drive so many important talented offspring out of the country. Other countries would only be so happy to collect them all, in dresses or trousers.

  • 33
    14

    This lady have a choice, if she doesn’t like the school and it’s ethos then she should go to the school of choice and it seem CIS is not meeting her expectations.
    This school should not change it’s character to please the unruly and unaccountable people we are breeding in the country, stating from our unruly parliamentarians. She could be a sibling from a present day politician or one of their cheer leaders.
    School uniforms that is gender based is the most accepted standard that is prevailing all top schools in the country and most countries and people like this person is trying to dilute it.She should find another school. I would send my siblings to CIS.

    • 36
      6

      Nimal,

      Couldn’t agree with you more.

      As a former student at CIS, if Saakya or her parents/handlers do not like the system, they are free to take her out and find a place that fits her/his needs.

      As for the Prefect part – If Saakya cannot follow the rules and regulations of the school, then how is she/he going to handle the duties of a Prefect? Being a Prefect is not an entitlement.

      So, Saakya, when you start running your own organization, you can do whatever you want. Until then, just follow the rules or leave. It’s that simple.

    • 13
      14

      Nimal you have a choice if a factory is polluting your home do go live in another village?
      If your country has a politician you don’t agree with do you go live in another country?
      If your family things you talk too much do you go search for another family?

      What a stupid argument.

      How is it so easy to change a school? Leaving friends, Home and proximity, Applying to a new school and expenses.

      • 4
        2

        Lex Luthor,

        So, you are saying that the school should change its laws to accommodate one student? Get real, please.

        • 6
          5

          Rajiv,

          This is not one student. This is just one student who is brave enough to stand against systematic oppression.

          Schools are not prisons. They are places to learn and explore the world without having to embrace the irrational fears of past generations.

          Stop living in a fantasy made up by religious morons… A girl wearing a trouser and dressing up for a fashion show is not going to destroy the world but your ignorance surely will

          • 2
            2

            Lex

            She should learn how to approach It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder. we have seen student stand against oppression, What
            happens when a student keep a knife and say i keeping this when ever cake is served i can cut the cake.what is teachers action.

            • 5
              2

              rbh, you are caught in a slippery slope argument(google it and see) because of your personal bias .the day she wants to keep a knife we can say no, she isn’t asking to keep a knife here

              • 2
                2

                Lex
                It is always ridiculous to imagine yourself superior to other people

                I did not mean that she is keeping a knife i said when a student keep a knife what the teacher has to decide or take action to avoid keeping the knife we dont know what is behind mind to why he is keeping the knife.

                Even in cricket math umpire gives a wrong decision the it is rechecked and brought up with correct decision this how you approach the misunderstanding.

          • 2
            0

            Lex Luthor,

            Systematic oppression? Seriously? The school wants her to abide by their dress code. That’s all.
            Granted, a school is a place to learn but part of the learning process is discipline.
            I am a social liberal and not a religious fanatic by any means of the imagination. How people live their life is up to them. That doesnt mean that Saakya can run her own program when/whereever she feels like.

            Souting me down just because you dont like what I have to say is not the way to go. I am pretty sure you have to follow rules at your work place and am pretty sure you followed the rules when you were in school.

            As a society, if we didnt have rules, it will be anarcy.

            • 5
              1

              Rajiv,

              Students being able to express themselves freely with clothes is going to lead to anarchy??? …. most countries don’t have uniforms they don’t have anarchists roaming around….. your fear is irrational.

              As society we don’t need irrational rules… show me any scientific evidence that proves uniforms have positive effects on education then I will agree that uniform is a important rule otherwise it is like many Sri Lankan actions absolute fake solutions to problems.

    • 1
      2

      Bullshit Nimal… If only the people know of the crazy stuff happening in these schools… Hey, I used to know some of these “International” students when I was younger and the stories were crazy then… Like chocolate pussy eating for example??? The drugs???

  • 28
    17

    This is the beginning of corrupting young minds towards the LGBT culture which is not acceptable to Sri Lankan law, culture, values and long cherished family based society.
    If the rules and regulations which are in place for the best interest of the majority of students who come from conservative families, are not acceptable to the student, she could have home-schooled.
    Those who favour Indian court ruling are free to study in India.

    • 14
      13

      Champa the hypocrite,
      “This is the beginning of corrupting young minds towards the LGBT culture which is not acceptable to Sri Lankan law, culture, “
      Monks rape children in temples. Is that acceptable to Sri Lankan culture? Go get a life, Champa.

      • 8
        1

        Raman
        Stupidity at its best. In every society there are people who want to go against the nature, other people’s rights and cultural values. That is why there is a law that punishes every such culprit. If everyone is perfect, there is no need of laws, police, courts or prisons.

        • 1
          2

          Stupid Champa,
          Who decides what our “culture” is? Some rapist in a temple who wants women to wear long dresses while the Sigiriya paintings are topless?

    • 6
      4

      Champa

      If the rules and regulations which are in place for the best interest of the majority of students.

      To Protect form dengue students have to wear long clothes, rules and regulations will must be abided to protect the life, safety first in some cases student have to take action developed appropriate plans, According the rule of world health organization the student is correct.

      • 10
        3

        rbh
        If there is a dengue problem at the CIS, then the solution is not wearing trousers but eliminating dengue vector breeding sites in the school premises!!!

        • 2
          1

          Champa

          Mosquitoes dont understand borders or school premises. think with multi-dimensional,

        • 2
          1

          Champa

          eliminating dengue vector breeding sites in the school premises!

          This is not happening The eliminating dengue vector breeding sites in the school premises or nearby.

          Mosquitoes can fly the are not limited to premises and border It is better to prevent than to cure.

  • 2
    12

    Whatever the intrinsic right and wrongs of the issue and response, the larger picture is that this, if given too much play, will feed in to the “Bolsanaro” blowback effect that is coming, or rather, ongoing.

    • 3
      0

      bugger bolsanaro.What are you doing to get the defence treaty with us ratified.

    • 4
      3

      Better get some expert advice from Malcolm Ranjith.
      The Phony Political scientist welcome back to CT.
      Long time no see.

    • 6
      3

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slippery_slope

      This is your personal bias not reality.

  • 5
    1

    I am somewhat sure that Gateway College, might be next in the limelight soon. Hopefully the owner looks into it.

    • 1
      0

      better the owner works bit closely with Dehiwala GW team…

  • 13
    5

    Waste of time. There are more important things to discuss about education in Srl Lanka. Poor children coming to school with out breakfast shoes books etc. What if Dambana Adhivasi’s children want to wear loin clot.and attend school armed with an axe their traditional. Those who don’t like to obey rules must find another school.

    • 9
      8

      Yes Upali next time you come to police to complaining that someone robbed you they should tell you the same thing. We have more important issues get lost.

  • 0
    0

    “fear of parental anger or school punishment” is the fundamental force that generates fascism in Sri Lanka and solidifies structures in resistance to change leading to a rejection of the global civilization of the species Homo sapiens with its commitment to its self transformation into a sustainable and resilient one based on the values of tolerance and inclusiveness, its doctrine of human rights and its governance through processes based on the implementing of laws.

    This “fear of parental anger or school punishment” is generated by the assaulting of children by their parents and teachers. If this violence is brought to an end fascism will be brought to an end too. This violence against children by their parents and teachers is the root of fascism and this must be stopped.

    If veezeejee&gobbledygookwithapeehechdee is part of what is required to deconstruct fascism then that is fine. Just get the job done please and do it fast!

  • 2
    5

    all these international schools should be taken into task I was shocked to see the way Lyceum International school Kandana & Wattala works – No quality and rude behavior from their principals this will not lead in building good students for the future

    • 1
      2

      The same with Gateway College,

  • 13
    15

    Actually schools should not have the authority to tell anyone how to dress you can’t impose culture on people it is something they are free to choose themselves.

    Laws of Sr Lanka are utter jokes and way outdated for our times…

    • 12
      5

      Lex Luther
      Did you go to school in a Uniform or an Amude ? It seems you are outdated not the laws governing Uniforms in schools.

      • 3
        5

        Steve

        Did your great granma wear a silk bra?
        Did your grandfather wear Nike shoes?
        Did your mother wear Victoria secrets?

        What a dumb argument.

        What I wore is irrelevant. The next generation is free to choose their own clothes.

        • 3
          2

          Lex Luthor
          You imbecile your arguments are dumb and laughable. Of course the next generation is free to choose their own clothes, outside a school. At a school they wear a uniform to show that everybody is equal. We are still proud of our school uniform. Assuming you went to a Mahavidyala, even they have nice uniforms equal for all students, either male or female.

          • 3
            0

            Steve, You retard! everyone doesn’t magically become equal by wearing a uniform (It’s a myth, a false solution to a complex problem).

            Some teachers are proud to belittle and humiliate children thinking that helps them, their pride like yours doesn’t justify their actions.

            So instead of giving your personal opinion that is based on how you grew up if you want to justify forcing uniforms on children give evidence of it having positive effects.

  • 17
    3

    Storm in a tea cup. The young lady should grow up and learn to be mature, then she will begin to understand that she need to learn to adjust, and that no amount of stamping her feet will get her where she wants to go in the real world. Be REAL!

  • 6
    1

    The general advice SOS international

    How to protect yourself from being infected with dengue fever

    Avoid being outdoors at the time when the mosquitos are most active; for dengue mosquitos, this is during the daytime.

    Wear clothes which cover as much of your body as possible.

  • 16
    4

    There are codes of conduct that International schools have to adhere to. Saakya or her father cannot dictate that to the school. If she or her father are not happy then she can go back to the school she came from or join a Mahavidyalaya. Saakya is free to come out of the closet and express her support to the LGBTIQI+ community, but do that outside the CIS school.

    • 11
      5

      Steve,
      Saakya or her father cannot dictate anything to CIS, but you have some special rights to ask Saakya to join a Mahavidyalaya?

      What made you think that if she joins a Mahavidyalaya her problems will be sorted out?

      • 12
        9

        Fathima
        Appears she is a young lady with problems. Attitude, disrespect for rules and regulations etc. Good schools teach discipline. And if she is not prepared to fall in line with CIS , alternatives are schools with less emphasis on codes of conduct and discipline.

        • 3
          3

          Steve,
          “alternatives are schools with less emphasis on codes of conduct and discipline” –


          Have you done (or is there) any study to support that Mahavidyalayas are “schools with less emphasis on codes of conduct and discipline” compared to international schools in SL before you could say that in public?

          Other than principal’s letter published, what other evidence you got to talk about the affected student’s attitude?

          • 2
            0

            Fathima
            No need of any specific studies. The evidence is there to see with your own eyes. Of course if you happen to be a “frog in the well” then no one can help.

    • 4
      2

      Firstly, homosexuality is illegal in this country so are all forms of sexual behavior apart from the norm. It is therefore illegal for the school to allow such practises and have uniforms to satisfy those who make such requests.
      It’s still school .Shut up and study.

  • 11
    8

    The destruction of a society begins when moral and ethical values are disregarded in schools. CIS and all educational institutions should stand firm again the LGBTIQI+ rainbow brigade.

    • 7
      2

      The destruction of society began when we started teaching religious morals instead of human decency to accept people for their diversity. Society not so long ago had morals that a woman should work like a slave for her husband or that children should be given corporal punishment…. Morals and Ethics change as we understand more about ourselves it’s sad that you can’t seem to understand that

  • 12
    0

    Again, it is a “private” school. Even if the aggrieved party goes to the supreme court, it is unlikely to do anything since LGBT rights are non-existent from a legal standpoint. If the law is changed, then there is a good case of a massive law suite to push CIS into a corner. I am all for equality of opportunity regardless of gender, race, religion, caste, wealth, etc but I have to be clear, I am TOTALLY against American (and worse Candian) style INTERSECTIONAL politics, where, in Ontario misgendering a person can lead to a fine and refusing to pay the fine can get you in jail. This is how Jordan Peterson came to fame when he refused to be compelled/forced to use preferred pronouns. If you want “Equality of Opportunity” I’ll be your biggest ally however if decide push “Intersectional Politics” I’ll be your worst enemy. For example, Tamils in Sri Lanka never asked for special treatment. All they have been asking for decades is the “Equality of Opportunity” for example Governance, economics and so on. Tamils never asked for special quotas for them in the Parliament. All they asked was for was power-sharing at a provincial level. We should all without hesitation support “Equality of Opportunity”.

    • 3
      2

      Thanos bro you misunderstand me,

      This whole issue here is because she is LGBT we assume she has no right what so ever as a human(Even if you are a criminal and stay in prison there are rights that the government is suppose to protect)

      But think she was a “normal” girl and felt that the uniform does not allow her to express her individuality…. It is also a fundamental right of a person to express themselves and feel free and safe(even in a school).

      Not to be bullied by teachers and principals for such a silly thing like a uniform

      • 0
        1

        WRONG! There is NO, I repeat NO freedom of expression in a private institution, especially in a private school. Even in public schools, you still have to obey the rules but in theory, you have a better chance of challenging them in court and get rules changed. When someone comes to my private house or my private business you don’t have freedom of expression. You are welcome only as long as you obey my rules. If you have a problem then you can leave my house or business and shout all want in a public space. You have the absolute right to gather and protest in public places. When I walk into my gym I must obey the rules they have set. If I don’t like the rules I am free to join another gym. Nobody is forcing me to be at that gym. My higher education at one point was at a private institution. There were some ridiculous dress-codes however, I had to suck-it-up and follow the rules. That’s life. This girl is not entitled to any special treatment. If she thinks so, then that’s her problem. If you find those rules ‘silly ‘, that’s your problem. Whether you think it is ‘silly’ is irrelevant. If she does not like the rules set by her school she is free to leave. I am sure she knows where the gate is. But, she is perfectly entitled to assemble a crowd OUTSIDE CIS and protest all she wants. She can go to the courts if she so wishes. Oh, and about the, “to express her individuality” nonsense, CIS as a private institution can say “we don’t give a $h!t about your individuality”. She seems to have a case of “Narcissistic entitlement”.

        • 2
          1

          Thanos you dumb s**t!!!!! Your interpretation of the law isn’t the REAL LAW!

          Just because you are a private institute doesn’t mean you can do what ever sh*t you want! If a private school put a law all students need to come to school naked, will they be forced to come naked???

          Your private home and a private institute are not the same. Even at your home you can’t do what ever you like. You can’t invite a friend and smash his brains out because it is your home you have to ask him to leave politely. If it’s a private institute and your customer comes and complains that you are doing shit you can’t throw them out without facing punishment for doing so. If you have people working for you, you need to treat them with respect and follow labor rules you can’t tell them stupid shit the same way you talk here. If they know the countries law they could easily case a fundamental rights law suite against you.

          CIS could take action against her if she resorted to violence or did not preform academically and so on. There are plenty of examples around the world where students have challenged and sued schools for trying to impose uniforms that prohibit them from expressing themselves.

          I also don’t give a shit about your individual opinion and homophobia. I for one think you are the one with narcissistic enlightenment wanting people to behave according to you. If you don’t want your daughter to wear a rainbow it’s fine till she is 18 but you have no right to tell that to someone elses daughter

          • 0
            1

            WOW, someones triggered. Me homophobic? I’ve been for LGBT rights for nearly two decades, including legalizing gay marriage openly and suffered some sharp reactions from our “cultured” people. Who you love is not anyone else’s business. Unfortunately, that is not the law IN THIS COUNTRY. Until that is changed if a school decides to ban any kind of LGBT symbols, then that’s that. Even if the parents go to court all the school has to say is it illegal in this country. In-contrast, if you ban certain religious or racial symbols but allow others then the courts can step-in. So that is why many of us want the LAWS CHANGED (Even marital-rape legal in this country). CHANGE THE LAWS!!! Then you can go after private institutions. Geniuses like you don’t get that. And off-course you can throw out customers who are misbehaving. Hell, I just saw a fellow get thrown out of a food City outlet a few weeks ago for shouting. If this girl violates the school policies, law, etc she can be kicked out. She doesn’t have to be violent. Again, I’ll repeat, there is NO FREE EXPRESSION in a private place. This is different from assaulting people or telling them to come naked you genius. Since you brought up foreign countries, employees or customers can get fired or blacklisted for posting negative things on the internet about their boss or products. A simple google search would have given you countless examples if you bothered. All it take is a simple “Can I get fired for internet comments” on a google to give you a good reality check.

            • 4
              0

              The kid is not an employee genius… and as an employee you don’t have to work for shit companies and bosses, you are free to do what ever you want.
              Kids don’t have a freedom like that, instead they are mostly stuck at a single school forced to abide by those rules… the reason I bought up employment is to say that employees too are protected from harassment, abuse… and what you are saying is breeches of confidentiality
              She wanted to wear a rainbow to a fashion show, not to regular school class right? (a fashion show it self is a sort of sexual show-off that is done in “school”, again I am not saying it is wrong… children too need to express sexuality and it’s our duty to protect them from predators when they do instead of shaming them and forcing them to seek expression in other unprotected places)
              She just wanted to wear pants, which is a very reasonable request irrespective of she being LGBT and the weirdo principle probably wanted to look up girls skirt so didn’t allow that.
              This is from a link you provided;
              California Education Code section 48950, which provides in sub-section (a): “[A] private secondary school shall not make or enforce a rule subjecting a high school pupil to disciplinary sanctions solely on the basis of conduct that is speech or other communication that, when engaged in outside of the campus, is protected from governmental restriction by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution or Section 2 of Article I of the California Constitution
              The Court determined that there was an insufficient threat of disruption to justify the prohibition on black armbands, and concluded that the District’s prohibition was aimed at prohibiting expression of viewpoint as to the Vietnam War.

          • 0
            0

            Just read up on how the US 1st Amendment applies in private institution including private schools since you brought up “other countries”. You can lose your job for comments you made on Facebook –

            * https://corporate.findlaw.com/law-library/freedom-of-speech-in-the-workplace-the-first-amendment-revisited.html

            *http://harvardcrcl.org/first-amendment-on-private-campuses/

            *https://www.lcwlegal.com/news/disciplining-private-high-school-students-for-speech-the-current-law

            *https://www.thebalancecareers.com/posting-information-online-can-get-you-fired-2062154

            Even in Australia – https://www.employmentlawonline.com.au/can-i-be-fired-for-comments-i-make-on-social-media/

  • 9
    8

    This girl should be sent to Netherlands where gay marriages were legalized first or to Australia the last to legalize homosexuality when she can legally enjoy being Lesbian Gay Bisexual or transvestite. Srilanka is not ready for such things yet.

  • 6
    9

    CT you have baffled me. This father and daughter must see a psychiatrist as urgently as possible to my mind to stop them from spreading a highly contagious decease without the help from CT.

  • 9
    2

    Hello Gender activists and attention-grabbing social pyro-technocrats

    Remember the US armed forces term “Don’t ask – Don’t tell” That seems to be a fair starting-point. Pls leave the school
    out of your inter-play. For years CIS has done a good job in a country as a desperate alternative where do-gooders and politicos have destroyed our system of education
    since the mid-1950s. Now only the VERY rich can afford a quality, recognised English education. This was available to a large many island-wide, including Central Schools in the interior – which produced excellent students who went far in academic life. If the girl wants to become another present day Oscar Wilde, it is her wish. She should not take CIS down the slope. I am for sexual equality – if that is the right term. That does not mean I recognise the freedom of queers/wierdos to display their private parts in the Bus in the name of individual freedom. We have to respect our cultural norms. This is a delicate subject that has to be handled extra carefully. Remember, the British teacher comes from a country and culture that is tolerant to different sexual orientations.

    Frank N. Stein

  • 2
    11

    The International schools behave in a Dictatorial manner just like the former regime.
    Charges per term has hit the sky. Parents are worried as there is no other way.

    • 5
      0

      Idiot! CIS is a “PRIVATE” institution. Private institutions are inherently dictatorial. Other than basic fundamental rights, the moment you enter a private institution, you are then at the mercy of “their” rules. Again, the only exception is the violation of fundamental rights. If you can’t obey their rule you’ll be thrown out. If you don’t like that private institution, then feel free to leave and join another place. What governments can do is, extend fundamental rights to the LGBT community and give them the same equal standing like the rest. If that were the case, then CIS would not only face civil but also criminal charges.

      • 2
        2

        Thanos,

        Just because you are a private organization doesn’t mean you can violate fundamental rights.

        But you are right the government needs to change laws, and not just this one too many Sri Lankan laws are outdated they only serve the rich and powerful.

        • 2
          0

          Looks like Superman has hit you on the head a bit too hard this time. I emphasized not once but twice, and on the second occasion I specifically said, *** “…Again, the only exception is the violation of fundamental rights…” ***. How did you miss that? As long as fundamental rights are not violated the private institution can put whatever laws they want within their institution. Homosexuals and Non-binary sexual identities have far less rights in SL. So CIS can get away with rules probhibiting symbols such as the rainbow flag. Other countries will find these things highly disciminatory but until the lawmakers change the laws, this student has to obey the rules of her school. What is so hard understand?

    • 0
      0

      Sandra baby,
      Govt. schools provide free education.

  • 7
    2

    She has to obey the rules of the school. If not rather than fighting she had the option to find another school that has somewhat liberal on school uniform.

    I have not seen girls wearing trousers in the western country i live.

    Looks like she has an agenda, either her own or driven by external forces.

    Why this doctor and lecturer wait for this instance to promote their point of views. I am neither a supporter nor condemn the LGBIT etc..

    These blokes are opportunists .

    • 6
      1

      I don’t know where you live but e.g. in England, Scottland and Japan they do wear trousers. Trousers for girls are part of the dress code in very many schools.

      https://www.qegschool.org.uk/page/?title=Dress+Code&pid=558 This is Queen Elizabeth’s Girls’ School. It says on the page: “Our Sixth Form students are leaders in the school and role models to the younger students”. And, great surprise, they can be leaders wearing trousers even. Standard dress code.

  • 8
    2

    When one joins a school information REGARDING UNIFORMS ARE already given to the prospective student and parents.This is so in ALL schools in Sri Lanka.In the US it is different,Even in the UK formal schools have a set Uniform.If one does not agree with this setup you need to go elsewhere.Personal issues must be addressed by a school regarding each student with care and concern.In general in any school, even in mixed Government schools in Sri Lanka there are set regulations regarding uniforms.We are lucky to have had International schools such as CIS being introduced giving opportunity for students to pursue their STUDIES IN ENGLISH while carrying on extra curricular activities.It is wrong for a student to be prevented from joining in such activities and if she has been originally entered where her sexual identity was revealed then the school must make the necessary adjustments if there rules have not specifically had objections to sexual identity.In this case BOTH PARTIES SEEM TO HAVE MADE MISTAKES WHICH CAN BE CORRECTED. The school of course must see that no student is bullied regarding any isue.This can be solved if both parties discus it rationally and not let the student specially be affected.Having taught several years ago at CIS an experience which was very positive. This can be handled correctly.There is not need to hurt the student for what she has stood upto very bravely and also to degrade the school.Most schools have at some time had to face issues and they have come through.A students LIFE AND FUTURE IS VERY IMPORTANT and in no way can one discredit her achievements because of her sexuality.Some compromise must be made.This is a very good opportunity for a school and a students family to do the RIGHT THING IN THIS MODERN DAY AND AGE.

  • 12
    2

    When one joins an institution one accepts the dress-code applicable. For example those joining the police force implicitly agree to wear the uniform issued. Tennis players have dress codes. Players have tried topless but were sent back. Cricket players too have it. I remember a cricketer wore a tie (for a dare), was sent back and later fined.
    .
    The Colombo International School has a dress code. This is decided by the Board of Directors (or whatever) which the Principal has to implement. Evidently the student has sought permission earlier and was told ‘The dress policy may not be relaxed. The student had the option to go elsewhere . The student could have taken the matter with higher authorities or court system. The student says that trousers is a dengue mosquito shield. No one will buy this. Bringing in this LGBT issue is a red herring.
    .
    There is more to it. Not many are interested.

  • 13
    2

    Am I the only one to feel that Chamindra Weerawardhana has played much bigger role is this saga than it appears to be.
    Also is is safe to conclude that Saakya Rajawasan’s letter has been dictated to her., given the gravity she digs into, and the minute details, which ONLY a professional writer is capable of.

    I grew up in a private boys Anglican School, and in the hotel for my entire school education, and we never had any issues about “challenging”the college rules.

    I guess that feminists like Chamindra wants to make a mountain out of molehill, to fit her agenda.
    The bottom line is We is Sri Lanka, live in a society which discriminated between gender, @ all levels.
    So, one needs to come to terms with the environment that we live in, and be sensitive the forces of society, rather than trying to live of absolute isolation.

    • 9
      1

      You are right Dharshana, This letter has been drafted by that weirdo Chamindra who seems to have taken the student ‘under her wing’.

  • 0
    3

    I do not understand why this should be an all or non option. If a female student wants to wear trousers, a very reasonable request, she should be able to do so, and she could have requested to wear trousers, because she fears mosquito bites and dengue. Since Muslim girls are already wearing trousers, it does not in fact break the dress code and so girls should be allowed to wear trousers as well as the boys. As for the Rainbow flag, rather than the flag waving about the LGBTQ rights (pun intended) if the student just used those colours in a tie die costume I am pretty sure she could have got by. The rule number one in making political statements is the subtlety at first. If you go guns flashing at the first instance you are going to get shot down right at the start.

    • 2
      0

      wannihami ,

      Generally Muslim girls wear trousers in Muslim schools even though
      there could be a couple of exceptions . I have seen Muslim girls going
      non Muslim schools wearing the uniforms of their schools which are
      not trousers . However , this girl Sakya , deciding to break school rules
      can not be called a “bold” act simply because that is not her aim of
      going school ! Systems in schools may be outdated , but children going
      schools are not the ones who take the issue into their hands to punish
      schools in order to get changes introduced . Simply , children going to
      schools to learn and not to teach . All parents should sit and take it with
      school administrations !

  • 2
    0

    I believe this is the clear case to bring it to the notice of the Parliament through Petition and enact as a Law in general. The law should applicable to Government, Semi-Government or Privately owned institutions provide education to the children to be fair and child friendly. Offenders get a maximum punishment of 5 year, bar from working with children for a considerable period and a must attend rehabilitation program educate the children rights and its consequences.

  • 8
    0

    Dear Parents of Saakya – It is obvious that the writer is known to you..Cannot understand why she is trying to promote her agendas using this child who is a minor. .How can you keep her at CIS and attack the school saying that the school / principal should change . NO , you should discipline your child or put her to another school where your / her / writers values are respected. Given the publicity to an issue like this i am not sure whether any private school will accept her.Over to you Chamindra !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • 3
    0

    Saakya is all set to get into a fine college with a full scholarship, by milking this sob story of hers, well maybe its Dinesh. Doesn’t it feel great to be the privileged, entitlist, radical kid who challenges ‘uniform violence’ (is that even a thing?).

    As for CIS, you could have handled this situation way better, within the confines of the laws of the school and the country but also with utmost respect to the needs of a student, to make them feel safe in their own school. At the end, schools are meant to be safe places for children.

  • 1
    2

    Homophobic? I believe School has done this just to make Muslim students and their parents happy. Muslims are Number 1 homophobic. They do this even in Europe.

  • 4
    0

    I think this girl is playing everyone……if she is a A-grade student and if she can prove harassment and being ostracized, she will be on a solid footing to apply for and get a scholarship to a good university……These British and American buggers with their bleeding hearts will just love to include a marginalized exotic and intelligent lesbian in their campuses…..Just go to the interview and weep a bit and Bob’s your Uncle!!

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