21 October, 2017

Event Invitations: Books Launches And Discussion

A new book by Philip Shantha will be launched on August 2nd. The Mango Tree, by Prof Rajiva Wijesinha will be launched on August 1st. A discussion on the IMF Agreement will be held in Colombo on August 2nd.

A new book by Philip ShanthaPhilip

The Mango Tree, by Prof Rajiva Wijesinha:event

The Alliance for Economic Democracy is deeply concerned about the negative impact of the IMF Extended Fund Facility agreed to by the Government of Sri Lanka in June 2016. This IMF Agreement provides a US$ 1.5 billion loan and comes with a number of conditions that will adversely impact the economic and social life of the people in this country. However, despite the dangers inherent in this IMF Agreement, it has not been critically scrutinized nor adequately discussed in the media.

To discuss the fall out of the IMF Agreement and related issues the Alliance for Economic Democracy is organising a public event on Tuesday, 2nd August 2016 at 4pm, at the Colombo Library Auditorium. The media and the public are invited to participate in the event.Sinhala-posterAED IMF Event Tamily Flyer

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    RE: Event Invitations: Books Launches And Discussion

    “A new book by Philip Shantha will be launched on August 2nd. The Mango Tree, by Prof Rajiva Wijesinha will be launched on August 1st. A discussion on the IMF Agreement will be held in Colombo on August 2nd”

    Very good. Expose, expose and expose!

    Will anybody write the Sri Lankan version of the Common Sense Pamphlet in Sinhala, Tamil and English?

    Common Sense (pamphlet)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Sense_(pamphlet)

    Common Sense is a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775–76 advocating independence from Great Britain to people in the Thirteen Colonies. Written in clear and persuasive prose, Paine marshaled moral and political arguments to encourage common people in the Colonies to fight for egalitarian government. It was published anonymously on January 10, 1776, at the beginning of the American Revolution, and became an immediate sensation.

    It was sold and distributed widely and read aloud at taverns and meeting places. In proportion to the population of the colonies at that time (2.5 million), it had the largest sale and circulation of any book published in American history.[2] As of 2006, it remains the all-time best selling American title, and is still in print today.

    Common Sense made public a persuasive and impassioned case for independence, which before the pamphlet had not yet been given serious intellectual consideration. He connected independence with common dissenting Protestant beliefs as a means to present a distinctly American political identity, structuring Common Sense as if it were a sermon.[Historian Gordon S. Wood described Common Sense as “the most incendiary and popular pamphlet of the entire revolutionary era”.

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