1 October, 2020

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I Say ‘NO’ To Sinha-Le AND To Sinhale-Bashers

By Malinda Seneviratne

Malinda Seneviratne

Malinda Seneviratne

Whenever a majority in any social context flexes muscles minority entities become wary. This is a verifiable fact. Whether or not the muscle-flexing entity is justified in doing so (for example, as response-flex, let’s say) is a different matter. The bottom line is that anxiety levels rise. And it doesn’t have to be muscle-flexing either. Even a simple matter of identity assertion (again, for whatever reason, including response to in-your-face identity assertion by minority entities and continuous and pernicious name-calling and vilification) can send shivers up some backs and that’s something to be worried about because things can grow and can be made to grow in grotesque ways even with the best of intentions.

This seems to be what has happened to Jehan Perera and others over the sudden appearance of ‘Sinha-Le’ (literally ‘Blood of the Lion’) stickers. Jehan (see “‘Sinha Le’ hate campaign must be dealt with by new laws”), speaking for the National Peace Council, claims that the stickers was “a part of an organized political campaign that seeks to exploit nationalist emotions”. Nothing wrong in nationalist emotions of course, and they are exploited by all kinds of individuals and organizations, for example to promote products and position brands. The problem is not the sticker or the wording, but its associations with organizations that are racist and intolerant of other groups. There is also the problem of the word in its ahistorical break (i.e. Sinha-Le instead of Sinhale, ‘le’ meaning ‘blood’ and its depiction in red which is obviously associated with violence). There is legitimate anxiety which spills into fear and even fuels extremism (latent or otherwise) among other groups when the word, either in its integrity or break, is painted on the walls of buildings owned by or associated with those in other communities.

That said, you really cannot ‘ban’ a word. You can indulge in ‘hate’ discourse with specific actions, ideological positions and intentions stated but when it comes to prohibition you are on shaky ground. If Jehan were to read the Bible and Quran he will realize that both texts are full of what he might call ‘hate speech’ far worse than anything so far uttered by those waving the ‘Sinha-Le’ flag, so to speak. Sure, such wording ideally has to be read and accepted in terms of the overall context in which they were spoken or written, but ‘bad wording’ is always ‘bad’ because frail human beings will read them out of context or draw them selectively. Like Jehan does.

A quick example would help sort him out. Jehan claims, “The term “Sinhale” was used during the period of Western colonial invasion that began in the 16th century to represent that part of the country that remained free of colonial rule”. Is this ignorance or deliberate misrepresentation?

In the early 19th Century, the great Indian writer, poet, journalist, independence activist and social reformed from Tamil Nadu, Chinnaswami Subramania Bharadiyar, penned the following lines in the song “Bharatha Desam” (Land of Bharat)

சிங்களத் தீவினுக்கோர் பாலம் அமைப்போம்,
சேதுவை மேடுறுத்தி வீதி சமைப்போம்

[Let us build a bridge to the Island of Sinhala, Let us call it Sethu]

Want to go back further? Well, way back in the 10th Century, Raja Raja 1, during whose time the Chola empire reached its zenith of glory, not only invaded but plundered and bragged about the plundering.

The Archaeological Survey of India, for example, includes reference to inscriptions at various Hindu temples built with the wealth looted from lands conquered by Raja Raja 1. These inscriptions list the names of lands he conquered and refers to the island we today call Sri Lanka as ‘Ila-Mandalam’. ‘Ila’ is a corruption of ‘Hela’. Another translation of a Raja Raja inscription has the island as ‘The land of the war-like Sinhalas’.chola inscription

Stone inscriptions at the Kailasanathar temple at Uttaramerur, 90 km from Chennai. The 1,200-year-old temple, built by the Pallava King Dantivarman has inscriptions of the Chola kings Raja Raja Chola, Rajendra Chola, and Vijayanagara king Krishnadevaraya. Photo: S. Thanthoni, courtesy ‘The Hindu’

There’s no sinhaya (lion) or le (blood) in ‘Sinhale’. It derives from ‘Hela’ and expands through the acknowledgement of the four constituent entities Yaksha, Naga, Deva and Raksha, each associated with a vocational sphere, and which therefore make up the siv (four) helas. Sivhela became Sinhala and its corruption gave us ‘Ceylon’. And that was long before the European invasions where Jehan would like to believe the noun was born and worse in marginal and fragmented form (“part of the country that remained free of colonial rule”). Now that kind of mangling of historical record is pernicious. If we use the liberties that Jehan avails himself of we might even call it ‘hate speech’!

Vinod Moonesinghe offers a far more sober reading: “The Sinha-Le sticker was a fairly unobtrusive bit of identity-establishment, no different from those which say “Masha Allah” or “Jesus is King” or “Proud to be a Thomian”. The inordinate attacks on them have made it into an issue, causing divisions where there were none. Most of the problem has been caused by people who don’t realise that it is simply a meme. People don’t actually, in this day and age, believe that they are descended from a lion, any more than people believe that they are descended from a couple called Adam and Eve who were made out of mud and dust. Sinhalese nationalism does not rely on the Mahawamsa story, but rather on the fusion of four tribes, the “Siu Hela” to form a single “Sihela” identity. Neither does it rely on a concept of race. Sinhaleseness is a cultural concept. After all, the kingdom of Sinhalay encompassed Tamils, Moors, Portuguese and whatnot. The last King of Sinhalay was Tamil. Every rebellion until 1848 had a Tamil pretender. People should try and understand what they criticize.”

Krishantha Sri Bhaggiyadatta add this: “Nobody taught us in school that there was a country called Zimbabwe, all we knew of was ‘Rhodesia’, named after a white mass murderer who gives prizes…in the same way no one told us that our own country was called ‘Sinhale’….(and that this included the last kings of Sinhale who were ‘Tamil’, etc.)….instead we were given the sibilant exonym ‘Ceylon’ (presumably a hack Portuguese/Dutch/English hack on Sinhale) and now ‘Lanka’ (i.e. the Tamil word for island)…and then, ironically, the splittist Eelam (which means, land of the Sinhala people) hence the modifier Tamil Eelam…”

The Sinha+Le, quite apart from being an ahistorical postulate, as Jehan has correctly pointed out, has intimidating overtones (even if there was no vandalism involved). Using that to mis-define and footnote (or even dismiss) the ‘Sinhala’ story as per the derivation from the integrative thrust (siv + hela) is mischievous and even obnoxious. It cannot help reconciliation.

The Indians got it right. India, since Independence, has re-named those states that had colonial names. That’s recovery as well as assertion of pride in history and heritage. Pre-colonial names have replaced the colonial names of cities; 13 in Andhra Pradesh 3 in Assam 5 in Gujarat, 2 in Himachal Pradesh, 2 in Goa, 13 in Karnataka, 18 in Kerala, 11 in Madhya Pradesh, 5 in Maharashtra, 2 in Puducherry, 4 in Punjab, 2 in Rajasthan, 13 in West Bengal, 7 in Telangana, 6 in Uttar Pradesh and 14 in Tamil Nadu.

The Indians got it right. We got it wrong. We never had anything called Sinha-Le. We had and are ‘Sinhale’ and that’s not about those who speak the Sinhala language or think of themselves as being Sinhalese who are different from Tamils, but about a history of embrace, of accommodation, respect and cultural cross-nourishment. That’s far more wholesome than ‘Lanka’ (with or without the ‘Sri’) or the corrupt ‘Ceylon’.

Names are important. They are political. They are about assertion and they can be about chauvinistic strutting (or read as such) as in the case of ‘Sinha-Le’. Their erasure (e.g. the marginalizing, footnoting and summary dismissal of ‘Sinhale’ or ‘Sinhala’) is about violation and violence. Therefore anyone interested in reconciliation and nation-building exercises that make for unity and dignity has to object to both the butchering of ‘Sinhale’ in its Sinha-Le fracture as well as its attempted dismissal by the likes of Jehan Perera. Sinhale-bashing in the guise of Sinha-Le bashing is out of order. Will not help.

We are about to celebrate 68 years of ‘independence’ (quotes deliberate). If post-war reconciliation is about recovering identity, dignity and embrace, then we need to revisit our names. ‘Sinhale’ is and will continue to be relevant. Its corruption should be resisted.

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Latest comments

  • 8
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    Your opinion is not important to the many, since they know that you are an another who stoody with Rajapakshe goons.sorry you are further supporting Rajapkashe goons.

    • 7
      2

      Malinda Seneviratne,

      “You can fool some of the people all of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time”. – Abraham Lincoln

      Whom are you trying to fool? You can fool a few fools like Vibushana but you cannot fool all like Jehan Perera.

      Before coming to the so called ‘siv (four) hela’ tribes ‘Yaksha, Naga, Deva and Raksha’, let me teach you some basic Sinhala language/grammer.

      You are saying, Sivhela became Sinhala.

      I would like to ask you that from where do you get this concept of siv (four) hela? Can you present any piece of evidence to show that the concept of sivhela used anywhere in our literature or any of the ancient inscriptions. As far as I know there is no any rule in sinhala grammar to derive siv+hela to sinhala. If it is so then Kav+pela should become Kanpela, Pav+hala should become panhala or pansala. Your derivation from siv+hela to sinhala is just like to say “mannen kotannenuy mannokka”.

      Your derivation of Sinhala from Siv-hela is wrong, and the present generation of Sinhala is not descending from pre-historic people who lived in Sri Lanka.

      The words in a language cannot be derived in a way that we want. The derivations should be in accordance with etymological rules. If a word is derived in a certain condition, other words which have the same condition can be able to derive in the same way. Take for example your famous word sivhela. If siv+hela becomes sinhala, under this circumstance, other words also should have to be derived in the same manner. That is the reason why I have given the examples of pav+hala and kav+pela because these words also have the same condition. As pav+hala could not become pansala, the terms siv+hela cannot become sinhala. If you can, please show us at least one word from the entire Sinhala language which was derived under the same condition of siv+hela become sinhala.

      You are saying that there were four tribes/races in Sri Lanka in the past namely Yaksha, Naga, Deva and Raksha. OK, now, say did these four tribes/races being a one nation use the term Sivhela to denote themselves. And in which period in the history of Sri Lanka did they use this word Sivhela? Please inform us the Hela words used by those four tribes/races to introduce them separately. Are you able to show us the way how Sivhela became sinhala and the reasons to justify your derivation?

      I am challenging you to prove the derivation of Sinhala from Siv-hela grammatically or philologically and the Present Sinhala community descending from Yaksha, Naga, Deva and Raksha.

      • 6
        1

        Malinda Seneviratne,

        Who are these so called ‘Hela’ tribes/races? Are they actually Yaksha, Naga, Deva and Raksha? What language did this so called ‘Siv(four)hela’ tribes speak?

        The Mahavamsa says, the missionary monk Mahinda Maha Thero preached Buddhism to the Dipavasin (people of the island) in Dipabasa (language of the island) but it does not say that the Dipavasin were ‘Hela’ or ‘Sivhela’ or ‘Sinhala’ and the Dipabasa was ‘Helu basa’ or ‘Sihala basa’. So, who were those people and what language did they speak?

        Hela or Sivhela (Yaksha, Naga, Raksha and Deva) tribes living in SL from ancient time is a mystery because there is no any historical evidence to prove that the term ‘Hela’ was used to denote any race or country. On the other hand the term ‘Siv-hela’ cannot be seen in any of the ancient inscriptions in Sri Lanka or in any of the ancient literary works.

        Prakrit (a form of Sanskrit, a North Indian Indo-Aryan language) was the only language found in the cave inscriptions of the early historic period. The actual language called Sinhala started developing only in the 7th century CE and first appeared only in the 8th century CE Sigiri mirror wall writings. What is known as Elu developed even later and appeared only in the 9th century CE. What existed before the 7th century CE was only Prakrit and Pali and written in the Brahmi script which was common to both Tamils and others. The same Prakrit and Pali were also found in South India.

      • 5
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        The scholarly monks of the Mahavihara in Anuradapura who wrote the Pali chronicles must have been very fluent in Sanskrit and very thorough/well versed with the Indian Sanskrit texts (Epics, Puranas and the Jatakas) and must have adopted all these stories (including the names) from them.

        Most of the mythical/supernatural stories and legends in the Mahavamsa were derived either from the North Indian Buddhist Jataka Tales or from the North Indian Hindu Epics written in Sanskrit. For example, stories with names/terms such as Pandu, Vasudeva , Simhala, Sinhala, Lanka, Yaksha, Naga, Deva, Raksaha, etc. are found/mentioned for the very first time only in the Indian epics/mythology Mahabaratha, Ramayana, etc. and the historians are not sure if they were true.

        Very much later, the Sri Lankan chronicles Deepavamsa and Mahavamsa have also adopted them (from North Indian epics) but with a different twist by including a new (Lion) story. The beginning chapters of the Mahavamsa stories which includes the names Sinhala, Lanka, and the four Deva, Naga, Yaksha, Rakshasa, tribes has NO archeological/epigraphic evidence in Sri Lanka and the present day historians do not accept any of them as true. The island was named ‘Lanka’ (influenced by Ramayana), the people were named ‘Sinhala’ (influenced by Mahabaratha), and the four tribes Deva, Naga, Yaksha, Rakshasa is nothing but a copy and paste from the Mahabaratha. Mahanama Thero who authored the Mahavamsa seems to be an expert on copy & paste. Historically it is from the Mahavamsa depiction the Sinhala race was originated as guardians of Theravada Buddhism.

        It should also be noted that even the early South Indian literary works Kaliththokai, Silappatikaram and Manimekalai have also done exactly what the Sri Lankan Pali chronicles did, a copy and paste job from Mahabaratha. Yaksha, Naga, Raksha and Deva tribes living in SL from ancient time is a mystery because there is NO archeological/epigraphic evidence what so ever to prove it. For example, Naga Place names and Naga people name does not prove that Naga tribes existed in South India/Sri Lanka. There are plenty of Naga names in both North Indian Hindu and Buddhist texts. People around the world always adopt names for self and places from their religious texts.

        From the archeological/epigraphic evidence it is clear that during the early historic period the tribes that lived in the island of Lanka were Demadas, Kabojas/kambojas, Milekas, Muridis, Merayas and Jhavakas (not Yaksha, Naga, Raksha and Deva) and the ruling clan was Lambakannas and Moriyas.

        • 5
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          Well researched and said, Suresh.

          You have caught out the phony ‘historian’ who is trying to distort the facts to suit his diabolical purpose. But then that’s ‘par for the course’ with this man, isn’t it?

          Let’s see if he can respond to your eminently illuminating post, although I doubt he can.

      • 5
        1

        Very good analysis Suresh.

        If the name of the island was corrupted by some outsiders like Europeans or Arabs or Chinese or Indians it is acceptable because they could have mispronounced it because they did not have the proper phonemes to denote the voiced grapheme of Sinhala language, but how can the Sinhalese mispronounce or corrupt their own words/language from Sivhela to Sinhala?

        Malinda is simply bluffing and that also without any logic.

  • 9
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    If I have to give oscar for twisting history there are two runners up You and Vibushana.
    I ask the CT readers to caste their votes. Unless of course the CT readers want to make additional
    nomination.

    • 4
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      Rajash

      Malinda Seneviratne types:

      சிங்களத் தீவினுக்கோர் பாலம் அமைப்போம்,
      சேதுவை மேடுறுத்தி வீதி சமைப்போம்

      [Let us build a bridge to the Island of Sinhala, Let us call it Sethu]

      Do you agree with the translation of the second part?

      I raised this point some months ago and literally none responded (including the so called Tamil Pandithayas). I just wanted to know why the Kavi would call this island a Sinhala Tivu?

      At the same time I am also aware of the fact that many centuries ago a Tamil poet from this island was known to Tamilaham as Eelathu Poothanar.

      Being a sort of Tamil Nationalist why don’t you shed some light on this sticky issue?

      Please consult your think tank, fish tank, water tank, battle tank, …………….

      • 0
        0

        Native I’ll do some research and report back to you

        • 2
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          Rajash

          “Native I’ll do some research and report back to you”

          With my limited knowledge of Tamil I find the second part of the translation completely wrong, confirmed by fellow commentator Ravi below.

          Find out in what context he wrote what he wrote. Did he write the poem in question under the influence of Opium?

          Here is another poem by Sangam age Kaniyan Poongunranar which partly explains as to why the Kavi would have taken a liberal line on borders and people.

          Purananuru

          excerpt:

          யாதும் ஊரே யாவரும் கேளிர்

          Yaathum Oore, Yaavarum Kelir

          Translation:

          All the world is my world, all humanity is my fraternity

          By Scholar Rev Fr. Xavier Thaninayagam

          You also need to remember that wars were not fought in the name of nationalism nor in the name of Tamils. Most were among themselves. Its about expanding kingdoms.

          • 4
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            Native ” யாதும் ஊரே யாவரும் கேளிர்”
            That is globalisation, global village.
            Foreseen millions of years ago by the Tamil Poet

      • 0
        0

        சேதுவை மேடுறுத்தி வீதி சமைப்போம்

        Sethu is sethu samuthiram, ie like Indian Ocean or palk strait sethu ocean
        மேடுறுத்தி means reclaim as land
        So literally the poem states we will reclaim the ocean so sethu as land and build a bridge or road
        சமைப்போம் this literally means cook, but also means build

    • 7
      1

      Malinda Seneviratne is so bankrupt that he could not get any evidence from any Sri Lankan sources that he has to quote the 19th Century Tamil poet Bharadiyar. In the 19th Century not only Bharadiyar, even the British misquoted that Sri Lanka is for Sinhala.

      #“These inscriptions list the names of lands he conquered and refers to the island we today call Sri Lanka as ‘Ila-Mandalam’. ‘Ila’ is a corruption of ‘Hela’.”#

      ‘Ila’ is a corruption of ‘Hela’.” is another joke!

      In the 9th century AD, under Rajaraja Chola and his son Rajendra Chola, the island became one of the nine provinces of the Chola Empire and was called Eela Mandalam. This Chola rule was the longest and the most far-reaching in terms of surface area by the Tamil power. The island remained a South Indian (Chola) colony under the rule of Rajaraja Chola and his son Rajendra Chola.

      The Cholas left after a fierce battle with the Sinhala king of Ruhuna. Someone should study to see in what context it says ‘The land of the war-like Sinhalas’. It is not necessarily the entire island. I’m sure Malinda Seneviratne is misquoting as usual.

      • 4
        1

        ***“The Indians got it right in renaming the colonial names. We got it wrong. ‘Sinhale’ is and will continue to be relevant.”***

        What Malinda Seneviratne is trying to imply here is that we should have renamed the country as ‘Sinhale’ and not ‘Sri Lanka’.

        We still do not have any definite evidence to prove that the whole island was once known as ‘Sinhale’. Jehan was correct, the term “Sinhale” was used during the period of Western colonial invasion to represent that part of the country that remained free of colonial rule. Kandy which remained free from colonial rule till the 19th century was known as “Sinhale” and ONLY the Kandyan kingdom was known as the Sinhale kingdom even though the king was a Tamil.

        However, we all know for sure that Sri Lanka was once known as ‘Ila-Mandalam’ or ‘Ilam’ so why not rename the country as ‘Ilam’? or why not go for its original name ‘Tambapanni’.

  • 5
    14

    A brilliant article by Malinda Seneviratne. And no one commented, not even the usual suspects! What wrong with the readership of this journal? Are they all brain dead? Cannot even think independently! Has got into the habit of repeating what the NGOs say and cannot make any critical analysis? This reflects the sad state of affairs in Sri Lanka today!

    • 5
      3

      Seems like they are too busy attending the Islam conversion classes espoused by Izeth Hussein and co.

    • 4
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      anotherbuddist

      Malinda Seneviratne types:

      “These inscriptions list the names of lands he conquered and refers to the island we today call Sri Lanka as ‘Ila-Mandalam’. ‘Ila’ is a corruption of ‘Hela’.”

      He is confused or probably meant Elam the ancient civilization situated in what is now southwest Iran. Elamites were highly civilised people.

      There is also another possibility, Hela tribes from Helsinki an Aryan people of Europe settling down in this island a million years ago. According to Champika his ancestors discovered Zero. Hence the possibility of a chosen race Hela tribes arriving on the shores of this island, to civilise the natives.

      Need further research to verify the link between Sinha le tribes and Singaporeans.

  • 6
    7

    Fact check fail. Subramania bharathi was born at the tail end of the 19th century. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subramania_Bharati

    Only a rabid journalist not a historian. Can’t take much note of this.
    S

  • 9
    3

    I Say ‘NO’ To Sinha-Le AND To Sinhale-Bashers

    Malinda Senevirathne: You are dithering or on the fence and you don’t have any attitude means you are still young and stupid.

    Just grow up.

    IF you are just looking for popularity just FK off.

  • 4
    1

    Malinda Seneviratne

    RE: I Say ‘NO’ To Sinha-Le AND To Sinhale-Bashers

    Thanks. Interesting viewpoint. Much better than Shilling ans white-washing for MaRa and his cronies.

    1. “The problem is not the sticker or the wording, but its associations with organizations that are racist and intolerant of other groups. There is also the problem of the word in its ahistorical break (i.e. Sinha-Le instead of Sinhale, ‘le’ meaning ‘blood’ and its depiction in red which is obviously associated with violence).”

    There is no Support for Sinha-Le. However, there is Suppoprt for Sinhala, which represents an ethnicity, the Ethnicity of Para-Sinhala, who according to the Chronicles, came from India, with lies of being descendants of a Lion, which most Sinhala Fools, who believe Stupidity is a Virtue, accept.

    Sinhala-le, means the blood of Sinhala, and also has violence and killings embedded in it.

    2. “That said, you really cannot ‘ban’ a word. You can indulge in ‘hate’ discourse with specific actions, ideological positions and intentions stated but when it comes to prohibition you are on shaky ground. If Jehan were to read the Bible and Quran he will realize that both texts are full of what he might call ‘hate speech’ far worse than anything so far uttered by those waving the ‘Sinha-Le’ flag, so to speak.”

    We should Use Para-Sinhala -le in the Land of Native Veddah Aethho, that truly reflects the truth about the Para-Sinhala from India. Of course, Para-sinhala are not the only Paras.

    3.”There’s no sinhaya (lion) or le (blood) in ‘Sinhale’. It derives from ‘Hela’ and expands through the acknowledgement of the four constituent entities Yaksha, Naga, Deva and Raksha, each associated with a vocational sphere, and which therefore make up the siv (four) helas. Sivhela became Sinhala and its corruption gave us ‘Ceylon’”

    Interesting Interpretation of Sivhela becoming Sinhala, but need independent support.

    4. “Vinod Moonesinghe offers a far more sober reading: “The Sinha-Le sticker was a fairly unobtrusive bit of identity-establishment, no different from those which say “Masha Allah” or “Jesus is King” or “Proud to be a Thomian”.

    These are myths, beliefs, with no definitive support.

    It should be Para-Sihala, because there is scientific support “Through a comparison with the mtDNA HVS-1 and part of HVS-2 of Indian database, both Tamils and Sinhalese clusters were affiliated with Indian subcontinent populations than Vedda people who are believed to be the native population of the island of Sri Lanka.” Journal of Human Genetics (2014) 59, 28–36; published online 7 November 2013

  • 4
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    Malinda

    Clearly you have ditched MARA camp and shifting towards MS.

    Thank god even at this late stage your brain has started working!!!

    Jagath

  • 9
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    Sinhale-Bashers?

    Methinks the writer is confused.

    I do not see ‘Sinhale-bashers’. Just exasperated people – Sinhalese mainly – bashing those who would let down the side. Bashing the virulent loud-mouthed louts who make every effort by their actions, their words and their thoughts to denigrate the race. NOW we have reached the pinnacle with evil men masquerading as Buddhist-Sinhala clergy and doing unfathomable harm to the Noble Message. The saddest thing is that at least one Mahanayake has come out with words of encouragement. Oh the shame of it!

    • 2
      1

      Spring Koha – the writer is not confused, he’s trying to pave the way for a stint with the new administration. I’m not sure if it is official, but reports have it that he has been appointed to a position on the Presidential Media team.

      He quotes Krishantha Sri Bhaggiyadatta, (who calls himself ‘Yakko’, which alone speaks volumes for the man!) to bolster his POV. Also, the Tamil word for island is ‘Tivu’, so from where ‘Yakko’ got his information (that it is ‘Lanka’) is questionable, to say the least! And this doesn’t speak well for the writer’s research or authenticity.

      There is another comment by Sulaiman (above) that also points to inaccuracy on the part of the writer.

      So all in all, (and knowing the writer’s history) this content should not be taken seriously, but put into context of the writer’s well documented chauvinism.

    • 0
      1

      Spring Koha – the writer is not confused, he’s trying to pave the way for a stint with the new administration. I’m not sure if it is official, but reports have it that he has been appointed to a position on the Presidential Media team.

      He quotes Krishantha Sri Bhaggiyadatta, (who calls himself ‘Yakko’, which alone speaks volumes for the man!) to bolster his POV. Also, the Tamil word for island is ‘Tivu’, so from where ‘Yakko’ got his information (that it is ‘Lanka’) is questionable! And this doesn’t speak well for the writer’s research or authenticity.

      There is another comment by Sulaiman (above) that also points to inaccuracy on the part of the writer.

      So all in all, (and knowing the writer’s history) this content should not be taken seriously, but put into context of the writer’s well documented chauvinism.

    • 1
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      CT. This is the third time I am posting this comment and wonder why it isn’t in print? Anyway, here it is again, with the hope that it will published this time around.

      Spring Koha – the writer is not confused, he’s trying to pave the way for a stint with the new administration. I’m not sure if it is official, but reports have it that he has been appointed to a position on the Presidential Media team.

      He quotes Krishantha Sri Bhaggiyadatta, (who calls himself ‘Yakko’, which alone speaks volumes for the man!) to bolster his POV. Also, the Tamil word for island is ‘Tivu’, so from where ‘Yakko’ got his information (that it is ‘Lanka) is questionable! And this doesn’t speak well for the writer’s research or authenticity.

      There is another comment by Sulaiman (above) that also points to inaccuracy on the part of the writer.

      So all in all, (and knowing the writer’s history) this content should not be taken seriously, but put into context of the writer’s well documented chauvinism.

      @Banda, all of them were in spam folder – CT

      • 1
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        Thanks for clarifying CT. Much obliged.

  • 2
    1

    Vinod Moonesinghe offers a far more sober reading: “The Sinha-Le sticker was a fairly unobtrusive bit of identity-establishment, no different from those which say “Masha Allah” or “Jesus is King” or “Proud to be a Thomian”.

    No difference from ‘proud to be Thomian?” What idiocy. A fool quoting a greater fool to ustify the unustifiable.

    • 1
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      Jayantha

      “No difference from ‘proud to be Thomian?” What idiocy. A fool quoting a greater fool to ustify the unustifiable.”

      One fool telling another fool, Stupidity is a Virtue.

  • 8
    7

    Nonsense There is no Sinhalese word for the island. All the names for the island are of Austronesian or of Tamil origin. Lanka or Illankai in Tamil is not of Tamil origin but Austronesian. The word Ceylon is derived from the ancient Tamil word for the island Eelam/Eezham which means the land of toddy or metal and the people of the island were called Eelavar/Eezhavas.
    It is not a Sinhalese word. It is a pure Tamil word. Hela is the Pali corrupted Pali version of this Tamil word. The ancient spoken dialect of the island was called Elu and again not Hela( that is again the Pali version).
    Around 28% of modern day Kerala’s population belong to a community called the Eelavar/Eezhavas. They were traditionally associated with toddy tapping and are supposed to have migrated from the island to ancient Tamil Chera Nadu, when all this was common Tamil land. This proves that one of the ancient name for the Island was Eezham as these people are still called Eezhavas and not by the corrupted Pali version Helavas. Got it.
    Elu is a simple Dravidian semi Tamil spoken dialect. The Vaedda dialect as probably did the old Sinhala approaches far closer to Tamil than modern Sinhala in its pronunciation”. (Hugh Neville. p.88.) The Vedda dialect, their spoken language is identical with Elu which was the spoken language of ancient Sri Lanka, which is semi-Tamil; as to the grammatical structure it is essentially Dravidian and simple (Emaneau, M.B 1961). Examples

    Vedda dialect – meanings in Elu & Tamil
    1. Muruwnin Elu dialect denotes ananku the ancient Indian god Muru or Murugan the Tamil war god.
    2.Moriga arrow in Elu
    3.Muru is a form of ananku, in Elu and Tamil
    4.Kanta boda Hill side like the Tamil god Murugan ir Kanthan the one who live on the hill side,
    5.Kur spike the same as in Tamil
    6.Iyaka, Iya arrow. kanu, vellu in Tamil
    7.Ira Sun ray
    8.Ira pojja The Sun Irravai as in Tamil for Sun
    9: Neya Yakūn means kinderd spirit neya/nesam is friendly in Tamil
    10. Taraka means star Tarakai in Tamil
    11.Kanta means Elephant Mount of Lord Murugan
    12.Appa means father same as in Tamil
    13.Elam means young same as in Tamil
    Veddah names
    The names Kanta, Vēlan, Valli, were common among the Veddas while the names of other gods in Hindu Pantheon were unknown to them. Whence came these names designating the ancient Tamil deity Murukan and his Vedda consort? Not from contact with or contiguity of the surrounding the Non-Vedda people of Ceylon in whose neighborhood they have lived for centuries.
    The word Serendib is derived from the ancient Tamil word CheranTheevu meaning the island belonging to the ancient Tamil kingdom of the Cheras( modern day Kerala). The word Taprobane originated from the ancient river Tamaraparani that still flows in southern Tamil Nadu and empties at the Gulf of Mannar. The ancient Greek Traders who used to trade with the Tamils around this area, called this area and the island Taprobane afer this river.
    Even the word Chingkalam or the Pali verion Singhale/Singhala has nothing to do with a lion or the modern Sinhalese people. It means in Tamil the land of the red/copper coloured soil. Chem. Cheya or Chikappu in Tamil means red. Cheppu means copper. Alam means maritime land or district. Just like Puttalam. or Keralam. Just like the name most of the soil in the island is reddish or reddish brown. Another name for the island’s ancient semi Tamil/Tamil speaking population was Chingkallavar. When the population down south converted to Buddhism and corrupted their local Tamil dialects with the Pali and Sanskrit to gradually form a new language called Sinhales or Chingklam they took on this ancient Tamil name and were called Chingkalavar in Tamil or Sinhala in the Pali version. The population that did not convert to Buddhism or reconverted back to their ancient Hindu religion and retained their ancient Tamil identity were called by the other ancient word for the island Eelam and their land was called Tamil Eelam and they were called Eelam/Eezham Tamils.
    This is like the modern Slavic speaking Macedonians still using the ancient Greek name for their land and the once ancient Hellenic Greek Macedonian identity, to now identify themselves their language and culture.
    When poet Bharathyar or the ancient Chola inscription were stating Chingkala Theevu or Chinkalam ( note they never used Sinhala) there are not referring to the modern day Sinhalese or the Sinhalese people but to the ancient classical Tamil name for the island Chingkalam and it people. This is what even the renown historian Mudliar Rasanayagam was referring when he spoke about the ancient Sinhhalese or Chingkallavar is prehistoric Jaffna. He was not referring to the modern day Sinhalese or the Sinhalese language, that never existed at this time but to the ancient semi Tamil Elu speaking Dravidians population who were called Chingkallavar or EEzhavas in Tamil. Now Sinhalese racists and historians are trying to distort this fact and state all this classical ancient Tamil names for the island and for its people that poets and ancient historical inscriptions and modern day historians refer to refers to modern day Sinhalese and its people and only, TO justify their genocidal agenda. Funny when the vast majority of the present day Sinhalese are descended from fairly recent and largely low caste immigrants from the Tamil country in South India.

    • 2
      3

      Thanks Paul.

      “When poet Bharathyar or the ancient Chola inscription were stating Chingkala Theevu or Chinkalam ( note they never used Sinhala) there are not referring to the modern day Sinhalese or the Sinhalese people but to the ancient classical Tamil name for the island Chingkalam and it people.”

      How can I contact you directly?

      • 3
        3

        Why would you want to directly contact anyone who selectively just copies and pastes things he finds on the Internet to make himself look smart, but distorting the original meaning of the publication?

        For example, he has copied most of the above directly from the work of a lady historian at the Colombo University who has published it here: http://www.hiddenmysteries.org/mysteries/reports/ceylon-vel.html

        If you want information, it’s better to contact the author directly than wasting time with washed-up LTTE apologists.

        • 5
          2

          Bagehot bigot

          “For example, he has copied most of the above directly from the work of a lady historian at the Colombo University who has published it here:”

          You kept a deafening silence on OTC (Off the cuff) copy paste con artist who frequently copied and pasted without reference.

          Many a time I had asked him for reference which he never obliged.

          He misquoted a line from Arunachalam’s book. The sentence was never there in the original book. Then one day he for some unknown reason provided his e mail address. By then I had the book scanned and ready for mailing. I sent the scanned copy to him. He never came back.

          There was another incident in which he was liberally quoting a book that he never had access to. I provided the link.

          Here is the detail:

          Communal Politics Under The Donoughmore Constitution 1931 – 1947 Jane Russell

          I had sent few forum sharers a number of documents through CT and directly too.

          Don’t you think it would be convenient for fellow commendators to share information, books, journals, research papers without annoying the CT editor?

          • 2
            1

            Thanks NV.

            Where is OTC?

            • 2
              0

              Anpu

              I guess he is on sabbatical.

              Today I have invited him to join us here in this forum. Awaiting reply. Will let you know.

          • 1
            0

            I’m not sure what you mean by “you kept a deafening silence.” If you read my previous responses to comments by “Paul” where I have done the same by asking him to quote peer-reviewed references for his “claims” as well as providing such references to counter his own “arguments,” I would hardly consider that a deafening silence.

            I admit that this is the first time I thought of Googling his highly disconnected paragraph though, which then turned out to indicate that the entire thing was copied and pasted.

      • 3
        1

        Anpu,

        If you want to learn how to copy and paste you do not need Paul, just go to google.

        • 1
          1

          Nimal,
          Thanks for the advice.
          Can you tell me where is he copying from?
          My brain works fine.
          I know who is telling the truth and who is lying, twisting,..

          • 2
            1

            “Can you tell me where is he copying from?”

            The entire Wikipedia. Do you know that Wikipedia can be amended. Its not authentic.

            “My brain works fine.”

            Looks like you do not have one.

            “I know who is telling the truth and who is lying”

            If so you will not ask Paul, LOL!

    • 3
      1

      Paul,

      “The ancient spoken dialect of the island was called Elu. Elu is a simple Dravidian semi Tamil spoken dialect.”

      From where did you get all these wrong information?

      Please learn your basics. Elu is not an ancient language and it is not a spoken language either. It appeared only after the 9th century AD, very much after Sinhala. Elu is a Sinhala poetic language used only for poems. Sinhala originated from Prakrit and Pali and Elu is a poetic language that originated from Sinhala, only after the 9th century AD. You have to analyze the Elu texts Elu Sendas Lakuna, Elu Bodhi Vamsa, Elu Akaradiya, Elu Hathvanagalu Vansaya, Elu Umanda, Elu Daladavansa Kavya, Elu Silowa, Elu Silo Sathakaya, etc. to see if any Dravidian semi Tamil words are also found in any of these Elu texts.

    • 1
      1

      Paul

      Care to explain why you have plagiarized most of what you have written from the works of a prominent historian at the Colombo university it here: http://www.hiddenmysteries.org/mysteries/reports/ceylon-vel.html

      I also note that you have never responded to my requests for the sources of your “information” on other threads, nor have you countered a single instance where I have clearly proven you wrong with peer-reviewed research.

      You are just some false google warrior who copy pastes info in a half-baked manner for your own entertainment. We are on to you. You can now rest in peace.

  • 5
    8

    Malinda – Congrats to you for presenting a sober analysis of a highly emotional over-reaction to the Sinha-le sticker episode even by normally sober intellectuals.
    Especially edifying is Malinda’s quote from Vinod Moonesinghe who refers to to the “Sihela” identity that was recognized by the neighboring regions,as well as to the epigraphic data from India that confirm the riches plundered from this island by Raja Raja I et al. over the centuries,.
    It is hoped also that this can put to rest the oft-repeated abusive references in these threads to the myth of the “Lion Race” being descended from a Lion being reason to reject The Mahawamsa – an ancient document to be proud of as Sri Lankans.
    The analogy of the whole human race having originated from Adam & Eve made out of “mud and dust” and (may I add Eve out of Adam’s rib) should be put to rest the pet peeve of some writers/commentators to these columns regarding the Lion Race and the Mahawamsa, who call for a rejection of the entire historic document.

    • 6
      2

      They used the ancient classical Tamil word for the island Chingkalam which meant the land of the red/copper coloured soil and its people who spoke a semi Tamil Dravidian dialect called Elu Chingkalavar . Not modern day Sinhalese or the Sinhalese language that used this ancient Tamil name and identity to describe themselves. This argument is like modern day Slavic Macedonians using the ancient Greek name and identity of once Hellenic Macedonia ( meaning in Greek the long slender basically highlands or the highlander). Stating any ancient and classical reference to Macedonia only refers to them and not to the Hellenic Macedonians. Sinhala is the corrupt Pali version of the ancient Tamil word Chingkallam. This language and identity is new. These people epigraphs are using and referring to the old classical Tamil identity. Stop trying to distort facts, just because the modern day Sinhalese like the Slavic Macedonians who only came much later have started to use this ancient classical Tamil name and identity for the island for themselves and their language.

      • 2
        1

        Paul:
        It is you who is distorting the facts. Other than your word “Chingkallam” (btw, from which century?) which you use to twist the word ‘Sinhala’ to, simply because they sound alike, the ancient epigraphic records in Sri Lanka are clearly of a different script from the Tamil, and have been acknowledged and established as ancient Sinhala. One can always make new constructs and develop new theories, and build convenient analogies to Macedonian or whatever language in another country to fit the theory (How about Georgian or Thai scripts?). But try to explain why the Tamil people (using the word Chinkallam for the “other”) in Sri Lanka ended up as <20% of the island and only relegated to the Jaffna peninsula.
        This rough proportion in demographics goes way back in the records from B.C. to the time of the arrival of the Portuguese in 16th Century and continues into today, except for demographic alternation due to South Indian Tamils brought in by the British during their colonial rule of Sri Lanka (1815-1948).

        • 3
          1

          CountryFirst seems to be fully confused. He cannot even differentiate between script and language.

          The ancient epigraphic records in Sri Lanka are written in Ashokan Bhrami script in Prakrit language. The Bhrami script was common to both Tamil and Prakrit languages. Sinhala language and Granta script appeared only in the 8th century AD. Elu (poetic Sinhala) appeared after Sinhala in the 9th century AD.

    • 4
      1

      CountryFirst

      “The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off.”

      Joe Klaas

      I am sure truth is doing what it is supposed to do, it is p*****g you (and your like minded bigots) off to help you find TRUTH.

      Please prepare for the countdown, get ready to meet truth face to face.

    • 1
      0

      Country First – you say, “Congrats to you for presenting a sober analysis of a highly emotional over-reaction to the Sinha-le sticker episode even by normally sober intellectuals. “

      You must have, by now, seen many of the comments that indicate the writer’s analysis (which you term “sober”) is full of holes and, in fact, attempts to distort history to serve his purpose.

      Time to re-assess your views if you REALLY want to put ‘country first’!

  • 1
    3

    Correction to last para in previous post…
    “The analogy of the whole human race having originated from Adam & Eve made out of “mud and dust” and (may I add Eve out of Adam’s rib) should put to rest the pet peeve of some writers/commentators…..”
    Thanks!

    • 4
      0

      CountryFirst

      “Correction to last para in previous post…”

      Please consider advanced gene editing and bio brick building if you want to correct yourself.

  • 1
    0

    சிங்களத் தீவினுக்கோர் பாலம் அமைப்போம்,
    சேதுவை மேடுறுத்தி வீதி சமைப்போம்

    [Let us build a bridge to the Island of Sinhala, Let us call it Sethu]

    The English translation of Tamil verses is wrong and gives very false meaning.

    the rough translation will be;

    [Let us build a bridge to the Island of Sinhala; let us build a road, crossing Sethu]

  • 5
    1

    Malinda
    Sir.Emerson James Tennent, British colonial secretary of Ceylon 1845- 1850, wrote, “Indigenous Tamil people have lived for more than 2,500 years in the northern and eastern parts of present-day Sri Lanka (north-east), known as the Tamil hereditary area. In pre-colonial days there was the Tamil Kingdom in the north-east (Jaffna) and two Sinhalese kingdoms in the south, called Kotte and Kandy. Drawings and maps from the time of the Greek explorer Ptolemy, and later from the period when the British came to the island, show how the areas of the Tamils and the Sinhalese were recorded separately from antiquity”. Emerson, Tennent J (1859) Ceylon, Volume 2 (London: Longman Press)

  • 4
    0

    This Fellow is on the top of the racial list of Journalist mention by PM in parliament.

    சிங்களத் தீவினுக்கோர் பாலம் அமைப்போம்,
    சேதுவை மேடுறுத்தி வீதி சமைப்போம்

    As for the translation the last word is cooking in last line in tamil….. Meaning We will build a high road in Sethu and cook it….

    How stupid can the fellow get .. He is hell bent in instigating racialism…..Like MR he days are also numbered…

  • 5
    0

    Malinda will soon join the Presidential Secretariat as advisor. He is in the line waiting for that posting. He will gradually switch over doing twists and twists

  • 7
    0

    Malinda,

    In other words, you say ‘Yes’ to Sinha-Le.

    Is it the kind of fallacy and ignorance we created during the century-long ethnic violence against Tamils and Muslims.

    Does the kind of barbarity we witnessed during some riots stem from these type of ‘Historians’?

  • 2
    0

    Malinda,

    Did Bharadiya write this in early 1900’s?

    It was like yesterday. Our own Anagarika Dharmapala called “Muhammedans an alien people” prior to 1915 riots.

    Hello, Lord Buddha is an alien too?

  • 2
    0

    சேதுவை மேடுறுத்தி வீதி சமைப்போம்

    Sethu is the name of Rams bridge, dysfunctional now and at the time of Bharathyar.
    மேடுறுத்தி means strengthen

    We will strengthen Rams sketchy bridge and build a road

  • 0
    0

    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

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