26 October, 2020

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Who Should Decide On The 13th Amendment ?

By Chandre Dharmawardana

Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana

A seemingly democratic-looking statement, popular with the liberal-minded types like the candle-vigil people of Colombo is the proposition, “It is up to them, and not to  us, to decide what the scope of the 13th amendment should be.  Who are we to impose our will on them?

If the TNA is representative of the Tamils, then we know that they have always officially rejected the 13th amendment in any form. They have merely found it useful as a bone of contention. Last year at the party session in Batticaloa (Madakalapuwa) Mr. Sampathan rejected it. Here is Mr. Maavai Senathiraja again rejecting it again, as reported in news media (e.g., the Daily Mirror, 31st May 2013). Mr. Sumanthiran has rejected it in several well-known statements. The LTTE fought against the Indian Peace keeping forces sent to enforce the 13th amendment. It was the Indians, and not ‘us’ or ‘them’ who formulated and decided in favour of the 13th. No referendum on the question was ever held to ask Sri Lankans for their vote.

Who gets to decide?

So, the criterion “it is they, and not we who should decide” leads to no support for the 13-th amendment in any form. However, the left-over leftist activists (Tissa Vitarana, Dew Gunasekera, Vasudeva nanayakkara, Dayn Jayatillke et al)  have themselves unilaterally decided for the Tamils and are strongly pushing for the 13-th amendment together with police and land powers. The learned lawyers of the LLRC, drawn heavily from the candle people of Colombo also hold similar views, although their mandate forbade them to deal with constitutional matters. If the North decides to also have army, navy and air powers, then by the same logic ‘liberal-minded people’ should be supportive of it too. In effect, the explicit logic goes that any group should have the capacity for `self-determination’. Following this, writers like Wickremabahu Karunaratne and Kumar David had no difficulty in supporting the LTTE even at its most gory days of carnage.

Further more, when it is asserted that “It is they and NOT we who should decide”, how do we decide who is grouped with “we”, and who is grouped with “them”?

Take some one like Mr.  Sumanthiran.  He went to school  in Colombo from his young days, and was in the same class as one of my young relatives. Sumanthiran ended up in the law school and practices law in Colombo. He lives in Colombo, just like my relative. How does Sumanthiran become a member of the ‘they’ while my relative becomes excluded from the `they’ and get included in the `we’? This seems to be a racist decision.

In fact, there is no “they” and “we”. All of us are in the same boat.

Furthermore, according to Jaffna custom, you cannot even sell your own property without the concurrence of your neighbours. That is the essence of the Thesavalam law. So, the North cannot do anything without the consent of the Mannar (Mannnarama), Anuradhapura, Polonnaruwa, Trincomallee (Gokanna) regional administrations. They too have a stake in the final outcome, and they too get to decide. The North  is populated by about 5% of the country’s demographic, producing no revenue for at least a generation, but costing the south immensely in money, life and limb. And yet, all the development money comes from the south. Furthermore, electric power and other resources come from, e.g.,  the hydro-stations and in the hill country. Hence all parts of the country are stake holders and  they too need to have a say.

This is why the simplistic “they, and not we should decide” becomes faulty.

We live in an interconnected world where we need to co-exist. It may seem as if Tissa, Dew, Vasu and other leftover-leftists have attempted to simplify matters to a ‘yes or no formula’ involving two sides, and politics is just too complex for that. This was also the problem with the ‘workers versus capitalists’ interpretation of history — radically too simplistic.

Samasamajist policy of Parity for Sinhala and Tamil

The current politics of the left-over left has to be understood as a historical evolution from the 1960s-LSSP policy of parity for Sinhala and Tamil (although some theoreticians like V. Karalasingham argued for more Sinhala for the Tamils as well as greater sensitivity to the nationalist-awakening of the South). Many young idealists at the time viewed the parity proposal as a remarkably generous ‘principled gesture’ . The Sinhala nationalists pointed out that it was utterly unfair for a mere 10-12% to impose itself on the remaining 90-88% of the population, requiring costly parallel administrations in two languages.

However, the appearance of bending-over-backwards to be fair to a minority disappeared when the real-politik of the decision was understood in detail. The Government Clerical Service Union (GCSU) was the basis of the leftist struggle, while the left also hoped to capture the Tamil-speaking plantation-workers sector. The power of the Jaffna English-school system was such that the GCSU had a much higher Tamil demographic than the 10-12% national voter base. It was essential for the LSSP to adopt the Sinhala-Tamil parity policy if they were to hold the GCSU and woo the plantations. Although the policy of linguistic parity was electorally suicidal, elections were deemed to be secondary in a revolutionary agenda. The left leaders believed that the  populist SLFP was just the `Menshevik stage’, to be followed by the Marxists capturing power as a historical necessity, a la Marx and Giorgi Plekhanov.

The realization that the much-hyped ‘principled stand on parity’ taken by the left leaders was a political pretence similar to the ITAK‘s claim to be a ‘federal party’ was utterly disillusioning to many young soft-socialists. Nevertheless, the rhetoric that the sinhala-only policy will pave the way to two-nations had been ingrained in the thinking of most people – especially the candle people of Colombo. Thus we see that even the learned body of lawyers who comprised the LLRC naively concluded that the fundamental reason for ethnic strife is the `denial of language and other rights of the minorities’.

The more fundamental reasons for communal strife, starting from the time of the Donoughmore constitution have been ably documented by the British historian Jane Russell. K. M. de Silva, Michael Roberts, Gerald Peiris and other learned writers have provided enough material to avoid the simple pit falls. The control of land ownership by a small upper class of Tamils living in Colombo, preferential politics of colonial administrations, continued enjoyment of caste privileges without interference from a central administration etc., demand for an equal role carved out on a racial basis (even though the Tamils formed only 10-15% of the population) were central to the origins of the strife going back to the 1930s.

The Tamil dissident writer Sebastian Rasalingam has been  a vocal critic of the simplistic view where Tamil Terrorism is regarded as resulting from language legislation and majoritarian hegemony. He argues that ethnic polarization was deliberately promoted by the ITAK with its sovereignty agenda, right from the 1949 Maradana declaration. Vaddukkodai (called Batakotte even in 1900) was the venu of a declaration affirming the ITAK-Arasu policy by even the Colombo Tamils who were previously closer to the old UNP. The caste-based hierarchical structure of Tamil society that demanded obedience from the lower strata was central to the success of the Tigers. Many of Rasalingam’s writings have been collected together and may be found at http://dh-web.org/place.names/rasalingam/.

In 1964 the LSSP leadership changed its tactics, abandoned the revolutionary path and joined the SLFP, now alienating the hard-socialists who broke away. The English-educated Colombo leftists could find no dialogue with the naive Sinhala revolutionaries of the JVP. They continued to believe in the earlier LSSP claim that  the `denial of language rights of the Tamils’ to be the main cause of civil strife in Sri Lanka. Thus historically, the candle people of Colombo and the left-over leftists ended up in supporting devolution via the 13th amendment, while even the TNA does not support the ill-numbered amendment. Some leftist ministers like Vasudeva Nanayakkara have taken upon themselves to push for a tri-lingual Sri Lanka, forgetting the failure of the bilingual policy of the old LSSP, with  `parity for Sinhala and Tamil’.

As we have argued elsewhere, there are simple technological or organizational solutions for cutting these political Gordian knots regarding language. The internet now enables anyone to have instant translations of normal conversation (but not poetry !) carried out in one language to be rendered in another language. Thus a Tamil seller of onions living in Jaffna can speak in Tamil to a Sinhalese buyer  in Colombo who hears a good translated version in Sinhala, while storing the original message in the memory of the cell phone for reference. The technology is easy, inexpensive and practical. No one is forced to learn any new language. No devolution is necessary in Lanka which is a tiny patch of the global village which now extends into outer space, with space stations and a slew of earth satellites that we constantly link with, via our cell phones, GPS, facebook, twitter and other social media. Given a bullet train like in Japan, and a fast highway complementing A9,  Jaffna would become the Aluth- Wellawatta (Puthu-Vellavattai), a new suburb of Colombo!

The 13th amendment belongs to the stone age before communications moved to the 21st century.

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    on a different note, chandre dharamawardane writes elsewhere,

    Chandre Dharmawardana
    April 18, 2013 at 2:40 pm
    The BBS is a political movement crystallizing around extremist advocates of anti-Islam which is a symptom of the increasing anger of the populace to the open face of islam, with loud-speaker prayers five times a day, tent-like dresses and other cultural practices going back to the middle ages, enclaves of Saudi-funded Muslim quarters appearing in municipalities like Beruwala or Kattankudy. (creating inter-Muslim feuds), as well as the increasing demand for the Sharia law.

    The same back lash has happened in `liberal’ democracies like Denmark, Canada, and France. In the US, the covert attack on Muslims is led by the US government using the `home-land security act’. How Muslim communities have been attacked using government agencies has been documented in the `dispatches’ series by investigative journalist Rick MacInnes-Rae of the CBC (see http://www.cbc.ca/dispatches/). The US government ensured that Muslim communities are broken up, Mosques closed, and the IRS deployed to heavily tax such establishments to bankruptcy or raise interminable questions about their tax status forcing them to use very expensive defense lawyers.

    The reaction in France has been firm, open and legislative, with the Hijaab banned,;and public Islam is forced to `avoir le visage conformant a la culture francaise’. Denmark and Canada have introduced similar, but less over-whelming legislation to satisfy the demands of majorities.

    Where Sri Lanka has failed is in its failure to maintain law and order, , and in not introducing suitable legislation that would calm the fears of the majority. The latter is a consequence of the government depending on Muslim MPs to maintain its strong showing in parliament.

    What should Sri Lanka do? It too should debate the matters openly and pass what ever legislation is believed to satisfy the wishes of the people.
    The quality of these laws (that is, there level of justice) will depend on the level of education of the legislators, their level of exposure to the wide world, , and on the foresightedness of the legislators who should also ensure that foreign vested interests (be they religious or political) should not be allowed to pump money into the country and buy up support for foreign religious movements or political movements. However, once the laws are passed, the laws have to be strictly enforced without corruption.

    The existence of the similar or more virulent Islamophobic movements in far more affluent (allegedly liberal) western countries with catholic or Protestant majorities proves that we have to look beyond Buddhist militancy to understand the phenomenon. So, it is NOT a case of `preaching’ and sermonizing by `good monks’ (as emphasized in this article), or `vigils’ against the BBS by English-speaking holier-than-thou individuals that would help. We need more definitive steps.

    What is needed is
    eliminating the sociological causes behind the phenomenon; viz.,:
    eliminating the destabilizing influx of funds from rich Middle-eastern religious movements,
    tempering the rapid propagation of social modes new to Sri Lanka that shock the people (hijaab, loud-speaker prayers, or for that matter loud-speaker Pirith). Such legislation exists not only in the West, but also in places like Singapore.
    Converting movements like the BBS into social safety valves where they are allowed to vent their views while the government MAINTAINS LAW AND ORDER AT ALL COSTS,
    Recognizing that quasi-religious movements also have large economic agendas, and the BBS seems to have attacked economic targets (halal, Muslim shops) even more than religious targets!

    which was quoted by another rookie journalist to bail her out and met with the responses it deserved.

    and in another place,
    Sudharshan Seneviratna’s “Public Participatory Interactive multi cultural Museum and Site Presentation” is nothing new in south Asian culture or ancient Greek culture, but it looks new within the generally intolerant Abrahamic culture that exists behind western culture. Abrahamic belief systems refused to assimilate other belief systems of `unbelieving infidels’.

    and in another place
    4). Karthigesu Indrapala, Michael Roberts, Horsberg, Thambimuttu and other historians have used phrases like “original sinhala place-names in a `tamil garb’, or Tamilized place names of Sinhala origin etc. So we picked some of their phrases and formed a set of possible titles for the book, and the editorial people in designing the cover etc pointed out that these two titles (english and sinhalese) are complementary and should be used as the readership will be bilingual.
    in defense of his book title “Demala heda gath Sinhala gam nam – Traditional Sinhala Place Names in the North and East of Sri Lanka” for which Pierre Simon Laplace said
    “4) so it’s the editor/ publisher’s choice! but i still don’t get how “Demala heda gath Sinhala gam nam” and “Traditional Sinhala Place Names in the North and East of Sri Lanka” complement each other. what i see is that the sinhala title sells very well among sinhalese readership while the english part helps it get a neutral-looking impression among the non-sinhalese book collectors. the third variety (the bilinguals and trilinguals that seek knowledge) is, by some strange laws of nature, always a minority whose voice doesn’t get heard too farther to opinionate the public. congratulations on a marketing-optimized book title!”

    I hope it would have provided the readership with the necessary context. The reason why Dharmawardhana switched from his electricity tariff bailout front cover from fully exposed advocate of ethnofascism. Mannnarama with three n’s lol so when is archaeology evacuating all the places of worship and residences in Mannar with Gota’s helicopter landing?

    Mr. Dharmawardane, first you show people you could produce a preliminary technical feasibility report to show that going solar is capable of doing us good, then we can talk about taking technology to suppress the minority language. you do know that opEd aren’t technical reports?

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      In fairness to the Professor, this is not the place to look for an op-ed or a technical report on Solar energy. Furthermore, setting up solar panels to get power is not a research issue. You just order it from a company and install it. There are companies in Colombo who will do it (just google it). The cost of the solar panels should be considered a part of the cost of building a house (like cost of marble on the floor and bathrooms). If it is a set of flats the people should get together and form a cooperative and set up the panels. But this is irreverent to the topic, and the editors/moderators should edit long interventions with rambles different from the topic, leaving only the relevant part.

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        you and many others accuse me for bring up irrelevant arguments. let me clarify:
        1. the comments of your professor was copied here because it would provide a context on his views on minorities that he attempts to hide in this article by engaging the leftists. how narrow minded his argument, you can see from his statement that north was a cost center for the last thirty years because of the war failing to notice what the north was before that compared to the whole south.
        2. the comment on his book title would have given you the idea that even chandre dharmawardane doesn’t want to seem to take responsibility for it. that should explain it.
        3. now coming your point in bold, did you read the article before you rushed to comment on your favorite person? please read what he suggests and tell me if it was wrong to ask him not to tell us half-baked ideas and go back to solar panel proposal to make it complete first. it’s not having writting an article that matters as your professor thinks when saying “as we have shown in another place…”, but having made his point.

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      Why can’t you stick to the topic? let is discuss the 13th amendment and not solar energy etc in this discussion.
      How is referring to Mannar as Mannar (Mannarama) become `ethnofacism’? That is ridiculous. If you suppress one and keep only the other that could be a form of fascism. Here the writer seems to have used both forms. Do you mean he should have written Anuradhapura as Anuradhapuram, and Pollonnaruwa as Pollonnaruvai? I think that is absurd. Take a train from Fort and go to Galle. Every train station has name boards where the Tamil form has changed the actual sinhala name to a tamilized form. But the Sinhalese don’t seem to bother (they probably dont even read the boards) and so don’t go about complaining that it is Ethnofascism.
      I think it is good to bring out the history of Vaddukkoddai (for example, I did not know about it) and such places; it adds to add to our rich cultural tapestry which includes all kinds of hidden things.

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        i’m sorry, but if bringing up a google translator solution to resolve language conflict is not irrelevant then me asking your professor not to come up with half baked solutions like his previous solar panel preaching is irrelevant either.

        calling mannar mannarama isn’t ethnofascism. i apologize if i made a wrong impression. but making unjustifiable claims like ‘demala heda gath sinhala gam nam – Traditional Sinhala Place Names in the North and East of Sri Lanka’ is. For the full conversation on this matter, you may visit the bottom of this page: https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/the-electricity-tariff-hike-a-great-salutary-step-forward/ no. calling england engalantha or ingilaanthu aren’t absurd ideas. but claiming the ownership to england because it appeared in an ancient travelogue or a epic and ‘archaelologically’ evacuating the people of england and their cultural elements is.

        when you get on the train please read those boards with a tamil alphabet and phonetic aid with you then you will learn even funny stuff. :D

        when you read history, read it fully and from all sides and arrive at your conclusion.

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      Mannaram மன்னார் also happens to be the Tamil word for the anglicized Mannar. So calling “Mannar” by “Mannarama, or Mannaram” by the author is actually going back to Tamil and Sinhala. So the use of the anglicized name Mannar is ethno-facism. It seems to me that the author has used the English as well as the name in sinhala/tamil languages?

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        wow, these people redefining racism and ethnofascism coz they don’t like what they are.

        the author doesn’t want to teach you sinhala tamil translations. that’s why i gave you a context with a few internet comments he wrote elsewhere. there are reasons why people responded to him with ” he should instead practice his own oriental religious meditation if he is constantly suffering from his bitter experiences of past in france as a brown man with an oriental faith and lesser intellectual capacity among his european peers. racism isn’t the answer to racism. had he used that time he spent on spreading racism to read and pracitce his own religion, he would have gotten rid of his inferiority complex decades ago.”

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      Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana sounds very similar to Prof. Nalin Silva. I am sure he must have been a keen and loyal student of Prof. Nalin Silva, seems to be very good at mimicking. I just felt as if I am reading just another article of Prof. Nalin Silva.

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        no, somebody says “the confused/ opportunistic position of chandre dharmawardane with regard to western approaches is apparent in his writings: at one time he claims the superiority of western science calling prof. nalin de silva’s supernaturally inspired ‘science’ crackpot science, because it put him at advantage that time. now when sudarshan seneviratne is seen to be compromising on ethno-fascit superiority, he isn’t happy and has “So Sudharshan, trained in a western Weltanshauung is presenting an idea totally well understood in South Asia as if new” to say!!”

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          This guy used to write racist articles under the pet name Gamvasiya. How come he stopped hiding behind pet names? Has he become a bit bold now?

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          I think “Mr. disappointed” does not understand the difference between Science and culture. Science is an assembly of universal knowledge that goes beyond boundaries. The laws of science work intact even in outer space. But crackpots like Nalin de Silva think that there is a `western science’ different from his own version concocted in Kelaniya. On the other hand, when it comes to cultures, no one denies that there are different cultural memes, specific to regions and time periods. When Sudharshan suggests that museum-curators must present a layered expose of culture, he is emphasizing the need to display this varying cultural patterns down the ages. I idea of having layers of belief systems is indeed already displayed in Hindu or Buddhist temples, but NOT in Christian churches or Islamic Mosques. So I don’t see what “Dissapointed” is getting at.

          Science and culture have different characteristics. The whole point of those who support the 13th amendment is the belief that (i) there is a different culture specific to the Jaffna tamils (and indeed different to that of Tamil Nadu Tamils) that is worth preserving (ii) that the 13 th will hep to preserve it. People like Rasalingam (a Tamil who has come form the “lower” castes) and I think also perhaps “upper-caste” but perceptive journalists like Jeyaraj) say that the way to develop and valorize this Jaffna culture (different from western culture or Sinhalese culture) is to stimulate it by creating a multi-cultural interaction (as found in the Colombo suburbs) rather than moth-balling it into a closed monoculture controlled by local chieftains.

          What ever it is, while the leftist leaders have done a great job in changing the society in the south by breaking up social inequities, they have had little impact in the North, and Vasu, Wickremabahu and others will not get any votes if they go and contest on the basis of their support for the 13th. They will also not get any votes in the south. So they stand utterly alone, even if their intentions are good.

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            i am sorry but mr. kautilya has to look at the preservation of architectural and cultural elements throughout european and arab history to learn that the fact is otherwise that it cannot be generalized as you and gamvasiya think. it is simply an abrahamophobia that you are suffering from. on the other hand, we too learn equally about the destruction of cultural symbolism in the indian subcontinent, even today!

            just as you are, i am also a proponent of the idea that science+technology and arts+humanity operate in different planes and my point is that you cannot simply solve a human issue like that of multicultural reality by using technology.

            i am all for multicultural interaction and that’s why i find Sudharshan Seneviratna’s “Public Participatory Interactive multi cultural Museum and Site Presentation” is nothing new in south Asian culture or ancient Greek culture, but it looks new within the generally intolerant Abrahamic culture that exists behind western culture. Abrahamic belief systems refused to assimilate other belief systems of `unbelieving infidels’. , merely a racist rant.

            I too agree that leftists of SL stand utterly alone and that MR was legitimately elected by the majority and that racism prevails as long as opinionators of gamvasiya’s kind write more racism and bailout BBS.

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              adding to ” i am also a proponent of the idea that science+technology and arts+humanity operate in different planes and my point is that you cannot simply solve a human issue like that of multicultural reality by using technology.”,

              it has to come from a reshaping of our thinking in a more humanitarian and altruistic way.

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        I met prof Dharmawardena before he left for Paris.Now he seems to be back and inspite of his exposure to a more liberal world, he is advocating religious and racial extremism.Is he expecting a Ministership in this govt?If this is the quality of our qualified graduates, one need not querry why people gather in public to mess up,others for a bun and a bottle of soft drinks.This class of interlectual is no different

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      “The 13th amendment belongs to the stone age before communications moved to the 21st century”

      Prof. Chandre Dharmawardana……??

      OMG, this stupid moron thinks 13th amendment is all about communications.
      The last line in his article says everything about the writer. How did such a retard become a professor? What kind of PhD does he hold? I sincerely feel sorry for his students. Can somebody teach this man the meaning of decentralization, about sharing the power and wealth among decentralized units?

      ‘Education is the most powerful weapon which we can use to change the world.’

      Unlike the educated people from other countries, when you talk to Sri Lankans, there is hardly any difference between well educated professionals/academics and the uneducated street vendors or taxi drivers. They all have the same mentality.

      These people are believed to be highly educated university lecturers/academics and researchers but when they talk/write, I hardly see any difference between them and those who pluck coconut in the villages; they both have the same low mentality and narrow mindedness. Sometimes I feel that the coconut pluckers are much more intelligent than these so called Sri Lankan PhD holders.

      I feel ashamed.

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      Thank you “disappointed” for the exposé on the writer’s motivations. Shocked and angry as I am at his brazen racism, I realize the need to counter him with objectivity.

      I am troubled that a professor of science, instead of using reasoned objectivity to debunk racism, promotes it, “in his own a tiny patch of the global village” with tortuous reasoning.

      That he has to frame the stakeholders on pure ethnic terms; “It is up to them, and not to us”, is divisive. Obviously no discussion can move further, without an “us giving you something which you shouldn’t have in the first place” mindset permeating all deliberations.

      For example Chandre Dharmawardana excludes Sumathiran from the South on the basis of his ethnicity; put in everyday usage “he is living in Colombo but belongs in Jaffna “ and by extension if there are Sinhalese in Jaffna, the same argument should apply. If he argues that Tamils don’t belong in the South then surely Sinhalese don’t belong in Jaffna. That itself is cause for segregation on the basis of race and ethnicity.

      One reason among many, why Tamils live in the south is economic; if the north develops, many Sinhalese along with their Tamil brothers would find reason to move to Jaffna, just as many Indians are choosing to move to Bangalore to secure well-paid jobs.

      His case against the 13th is tenuous by any stretch of imagination and can only be understood by ultraconservatives who think of devolution as a magnanimous gesture by us, the majority, acquiescing to a belligerent minority. The fact the inequity permeates the periphery despite ethnicity is lost on them; that Badulla and Moneragala are the least developed districts, and are examples of a failed model of government does not matter to them as long as “we” the majority are in control.

      While he argues for a connected world, he excludes political connectedness among his own people, and fails to see the facileness of being connected through technology without the buy-in of the people who are connected.

      Balancing the conundrum of the right to be equal and the right to be unequal, calibrating an acceptable solution to forces that pull to the center and the periphery, is the primary challenge. Not who gets to decide!

      Unfortunately for us, we have trite questions such as to who gets to decide on an innocuous and ineffective piece of legislation from those who call themselves intellectuals, and that too among a polity that sees no common ground of mutuality. Disappointing indeed!

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    i wonder how england was called in 1900 by the sinhalese? :D

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      Vaddukkodddai was called Batakotte by many Tamils and US missionaries in the 19th century. The B becomes transliterated into V in tamille, and Kotte is Kattai or Koddai. Today, Tamils call Kotahena KottaChennai, and Dehiwala has become Dehiwalai in the nameboards there. Look at most buses leaving the Pettah bus station. Tangalle becomes Tangallai on the name boards.

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        ah..the etymologist who knows of the existence of a ‘kottaChennai’. is that a phobia you have for the other race? Dehiwala is Dehiwalai just like nallur was something else for you :D it doesn’t mean you have to draw an arrow always pointing from your language to the other guy’s. btw, mary is maria and marie and maryam and mariyal too. what was it in sinhala? :D

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          and you think by having your own version of mary you are now eligible for patent on the signifier that is mary?

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        oh let me correct you. it’s ‘kottanchenai’ nothing different from mattakkalappu is madakalapuwa for you.

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        Government should ban or regulate these name changes.

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          no man, it’s nothing wrong in the sinhalese calling jaffna as yaapanaya and tamils yaalppaanam. japanese can’t pronounce everything in english. what’s wrong is to suppress one by means of power and by establishing absolute superiority for one language.

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            Here’s one for everyone

            On the A9- a few kilometers ahead of Vavuniya there is little town called Eraperiyakulama; the Tamil version EraperiyaKulam!

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              The winners write history!

              The losers ARE history.

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              The winners write history!

              The losers ARE history.

              Muliyawaikkal – June 1, 2013
              6:41 pm

              The comment speaks for itself. Thanks for educating us of yourselves and what you stand for.

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    1. It is amazing that the good professor ignores completely the number of pogroms and riots unleashed on the minorities. His simplistic equation is that the war was due to Tamil caste and power politics. The Tamil concerns that arose earlier (at the beginning of the 20th Century) was precisely because the the Tamils foresaw that the numerical superiority of the Singhalese would enable the Singhalese to do and say precisely what the professor is saying now.

    2. His argument could be used by India to annex Sri Lanka and drive Hindi down all our throats. The Sri Lankan population is not even 2% of the Indian. The point is that for centuries the people in the North and East have conducted affairs in Tamil. It doesn’t matter if you have a majority elsewhere. What matters is the language in that region.

    3. Thirdly his logic is wrong. He argues that the Thesavalamai applies to the North and they have to consult their neighbours prior to alienating property. Therefore he argues that they should get the consent of those of other parts of the country. By this logic, the people in other parts of the country DONT have Thesavalamai – therefore they should NOT be consulted. The good professor should be careful with his logic!

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      I live in Tamil Nadu, and DElhi has not succeeded in ramming down Hindi here. Initially they tried it. I am a Kannada speaker, and unfortunately, Kannada, Malayalam and Telegu speakers, or Hindi speakers cannot even get an education for their children in their languages in Tamil Nadu, because it is a mono-linguistic place which allows no room for other languages. By contrast, I find Colombo to be a wonderful place where a multi-lingual social setup has been created. Also, I fly from Trichy to Colombo and take Air Lanka flights to the West on business because it is the only airline which shows Tamil movies and speak Tamil, and serve food that I can eat. So minorities get a better deal in Sri Lanka than in India, and Colombo is one Indian city where there is a vibrant Tamil presence. If you Fly via Bombay or Delhi to the west, then you see that they have absolutely no place for Tamil, leave aside Kannada or Malayalam (I speak or understand all these) and other minority languages.

      You guys have a good set up in the south of Sri Lanka and so build on it. But you have had an isolated Tamil enclave in the North- that is not good for Tamils, just as Tamil villages in Tamil Nadu are miserable places.
      Don’t go for the Indian model which is not democratic and not helpful for co-existence. We have enough race riots and pogroms and murders every month and our newspapers do not even report them. In any case, the whole of Sri Lanka can be packed in a small part of Tamil Nadu or Kerala. Some of India’s cities are bigger in population than the whole of your country. Politicians here are not interested in you, but shout a bit to reap some local political benefits.

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        Doesn’t that mean there is a problem in Colombo (as opposed to Tamil Nadu)?

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        Come in your original identity, don’t spread false stories.

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          I am not a fake I do live in South India.
          You can write me to
          vinod_vya@yahoo.co.in
          and I cansend you some pictures of the miserable situation in Tamil Nadu, run by political crooks who are no longer controllable by the weakened central government. So they can get away with anything. This was not possible in the early days when the center was very strong. But our local villages are run by obscurantist, rich orthodox Hindus with little education,and who have petty fights among themselves. Tamil Nadu will remain in misery for may decades to come. Luckly, we have no plans to devolve power into the hands of such Muttakkans -no 13th!

          I know about this 13th amendment because Rajiv Gandhi paid fot it with his life. So the Tamil leaders (who are probably still pro- LTTE) don’t support it. I gather that the Sinhala people don’t support it. It exists e ONLY BECAUSE MAHINDA RAJAPAKSA wants it for his immediate p;olitics. This article points out that the rleft-over Marxist leaders also support it. But I think the day Rajap[aksa pulls the plug, the Marxists will also decamp with him. So, those who want the 13th amendment are at the mercy of MR. That is how I see it.

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            “Luckly, we have no plans to devolve power into the hands of such Muttakkans -no 13th!” ,

            The “we” in this statement shows who you are. No need to argue with you.

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              :D

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      Astonishing that even professors in a university in SL cannot mount a logical argument! There is something about ethnic and racial politics that drives,even people with some basic training, crazy.Racism,to change an old saying is the first refuge of a feeble mind,
      I suppose one must look to psychology for an answer.

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        actually the nazi scholarship included a lot of prominent german intellectuals of that time. german archaeology was at its peak during nazi rule. even rocket scientists and theoretical physicists were in the camp.

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          Inded, the LTTE was, and is supported a lot of prominent intellectuals. The close similarity of the Nazi movement and the LTTE has been discussed and documented by Michael Roberts. Some articles on that are found at the “Thuppahia” website

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            and you think one needs to ‘document’ the living proofs of Dr. Goebbels of Sinhala Chauvinism?

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            in the meantime, i also recognize the stauffenbergs of sinhala buddhist race.

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      lagrange says that the learned professor,

      “should understand that he is not someone based at princeton or cambridge or cern to play einstein’s advocate, or jury for that matter. having co-authored a bunch of papers on plasma physics and photovoltaics to justify his existence on the face of earth doesn’t amount to being an authority that validates theses on theoretical physics. (after all, it was a patent office clerk, an academic nobody hitherto, who turned what lorentz had already mathematically derived into postulates and presented the development from thereon with a high-school style narration). writing a few unsold books in the weekend and promoting them in op-Ed articles and internet comments shows chandre’s desperateness.”

      in response to his attempt to establish himself as an authority on science:
      We have people calling at the front desk of our laboratories claiming that they have shown that Einstein’s E=MC-squared equation is wrong. Then, we politely send a message to say that no scientist is available to discuss the matter at the moment

      How much the ‘learned professor’ remembers from physics itself is well documented in the conversation he had with
      Pierre Simon Laplace
      at https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/the-electricity-tariff-hike-a-great-salutary-step-forward/

      All these people forgetting their own businesses and poking their nose into the others expertise! And trying to give an their intellectual bail out those safety valve (lol) goons who forget their religions and go on preach what others ought to do.

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    engalantha —> england :D

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      and england belongs to…. :D

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    here is a checkmate question for dharmawardana:
    is what happened in 1983 July wrong? (Yes / No)

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      is what happened in 1977 July in Jaffna wrong? (Yes / No)
      is what happened in 1990 August in Jaffna wrong? (Yes / No)

      The answers will answer your question!!

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        1977 – No
        1990 – Yes.

        If that question, instead of a yes/no, was all your response to my checkmate, shame on you.

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          How about Nanthikadal-1?

          And Nanthikadal-2?

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            haha you keep asking question? still? :D how shameless is that. btw, two of my questions are still pending.

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        let me give you a more easy question: are war crimes crimes? (yes/ no/ may i beat around the bush?)

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    How does Sumanthiran become a member of the ‘they’ while my relative becomes excluded from the `they’ and get included in the `we’? This seems to be a racist decision.

    In fact, there is no “they” and “we”. All of us are in the same boat.

    dharme, there is a they and we when each finds the language of the other difficult for doing their business. except in the case of a solar panel like solution you give for resolving language barrier – try google translator between two romantic languages and tell us the results. saying there exist black men and white ain’t racism. white man discriminating against the black or the other way around is what’s racism is. same goes for sexism. oh sinhala does have different pronouns for males and females? :)

    sumanthiran is part of ‘they’ because unlike your young (which makes you a wiser elder? like your carnot’s theorem and einstein’s advocate ideas helped you? no wonder your own conscience suggests you that you could be seen an out and out rouge) relative he speaks the language which happens to be the only one understood by most of ‘them’.

    are you calling for the extermination of the language and heritage of a minority? then there is only one boat ‘in all cases’ as you would like imagine.

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      he (sumanthiran) speaks the language which happens to be the only one understood by most of ‘them’

      What if this Sinhalese person who was a class-mate of Sumanthiran happens to know Tamil? Then does he become a “they”?

      saying there exist black men and white ain’t racism. white man discriminating against the black or the other way around is what’s racism is.

      If the distinction is a bit like between black and white, the idea of having a special province for them to remove ‘discrimination’ smacks very like Apartheid.
      There is luckily no significant genetic distinction between the Sinhalese and the Tamils, otherwise “Mr. disappointed” could have said that the Sinhalese must preserve the purity of their genes, and the Tamils must be given the right to preserve the purity of their genes”. Then the covert racist nature of this distinction between `them’ and ‘us’ would have come out more clearly.
      So genetically too, I agree with the author that we are all in the same boat.

      are you calling for the extermination of the language and heritage of a minority?
      I think this question directed at the writer is a bit silly. We see that Mr. Sumanthiran and the writer’s relative are in the same boat as far as cultural heritage is concerned. There no extermination of the one or the other. Mr. Sumanthiran has done very well in Colombo, and presumably maintained his tamilness and his tamil culture. Perhaps we should send this Sinhalese class mate of Mr. Sumanthiran to Jaffna and then we have it all completely reciprocal.
      So may be Mr. Sumanthiran should invite his classmates to Jaffna and get some of them to settle there as a solution this problem?

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        so you are putting on naive kid face for the sake of argument?

        let me tell you, being able to speak a language and having it as ones mother tongue aren’t the same. why did you guys need the local language replace english in the first place? there were still those of ‘us’ like the young relative who could translate?

        even after a 60 you guys are not still ready to let the ordinary tamil man get his job done in fair and equal way and you think he having things his way where he lives in a majority is wrong? what do you think, you guys are some civilized westerners who would conduct a war crimes investigation calling the criminals of their own race criminals?

        nobody is calling for preservation of genes dude, it’s for the preservation of culture and identity. you think you sound like a good guy when you call everyone to jump onto your boat abandoning theirs? maybe in your imaginations.

        well.. the sinhalese students in jaffna already having their reciprocal share. it’s stupid to justify the illegal aggressions of a government because a branded terrorist group is doing the same. now sumanthiran had a good time in colombo, in your imaginations within your provision for ‘them’. what about the countless tamil youth who are professional nobodies who didn’t have the law and international connections to ensure their safety? or shall we ask sumanthiran himself about his experiences as a minority person? yes, you would even say the people now concentration camps are also being very well looked after. no point talking to you.

        yes, now the lands are being grabbed, time to think of settlements once again. after all “One cow in Palestine is worth more than all the Jews in Europe”.

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          let me tell you, being able to speak a language and having it as ones mother tongue aren’t the same.

          So, finally we get back to having the correct race – you have to have the right mother and father to be “us” or “them”. This the only definition of ‘race’ that holds, since science does not accept such a category based on physical or bio-chemical characteristics etc.

          Now, do all racial Tamils (defined in the above sense) vote in a referendum?
          Or is it only the ones resident in the Northern province?
          What if the people in the south vote to ship all the Tamils in the south to the newly created `Tamil province”?
          Aren’t we opening up a horrendous dangerous social-engineering” project based on race that can go hay-wire at any moment?

          “Disappointed” has to sort this out. I am totally against this type of racist politics.

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            oh, here we say science defines racial difference? :D well as for you argument against a social architecting based on race, i agree with you. there are practicalities that prevent. My point was that suppressing the identity of an ethnicity and its culture, which may very well not be geographically concentrated, by trying to sort of absorb it into the common identity by negating its mere existence because it is numerically a minority amounts to racism. bottom line is, sumanthiran and chandraratne are tamil and sinhalese respectively and at the same time they both are sri lankans. However, the latter, more common identity doesn’t imply that the tamils cannot group together as an ethnicity to deal with a matter of their concern. it is to be noted 13A is not the perfect solution, but something that tries to make a justice because the ideal solution, equality for all with admittance that there are different ethnic groups, has long been and continues to be a taboo in this country.

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    People are rejecting 13A for different reasons. Tamils may feel it is not enough or that it is compromised by the executive presidiency while the JHU and partners do not want to devolve any powers to the North. This alone proves that 13A is a median which could be a meeting point of consensus. Moreover it has been in the statute and prcticed in the South since 1978. So these protests and calls to decide are rather belated.

    At the moment most people agree that the executive presidiency must be abolished and constitutional change is required. But all this cannot be done at once. Northern Elections have been on hold and is now a priority. Govt fiddling with these issues will only precipitate a further crisis internally and externally.

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    OKAY Prof D: Let us admit that Sinhala place names can be found on the Jaffna peninsula(we will overlook the fact that many places in Sinhala SL have Sinhalisised Tamil names) but these places are now inhabited by the Tamils today.What do you want to do with them? Are you proposing a true Aryan solution?Have you noticed how closely your diatribes and scapegoating and style of argumentaion resembles those of the Nazi theorists?

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      in response to the ‘professor’s’ contribution to the final solution another person wrote:
      “i am pretty sure i can demonstrate to him by running a search on the internet archives that the random monkeys of nazi scholarship have already type-written all the venom he spews on certain corners of the internet, except that now i have to replace judaism with abrahimic faith and jew with muslim and christian!”

      A possible solution is to land Gota there from a helicopter and let the inhabitants know who is the boss and then get the archaeology to recover the abandoned heritage because the “Public Participatory Interactive multi cultural Museum and Site Presentation” is because of the others that this author has a phobia for.

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        * because the “Public Participatory Interactive multi cultural Museum and Site Presentation” is not gonna work because of the others that this author has a phobia for.

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      I think the question posed by cincnnatus:
      Let us admit that Sinhala place names can be found on the Jaffna peninsula(we will overlook the fact that many places in Sinhala SL have Sinhalisised Tamil names) but these places are now inhabited by the Tamils today.What do you want to do with them?
      is probably a misunderstanding?

      I personally appreciate what Prof. Dharmawardana has done with respect to place names, as he has expanded what Fr. Rasaynayagam, Karthigesu Indrapala and others had done, and presented it all in the interent. This requires a good knowledge of old tamil, old sinhala (Elu), pali and Sanskrit.
      There is also similar, but less extensive work on the Tamilnet, which is also valuable. Dr. Karthigesu Indraratne and others had dug up the old parkrit names that preceded the Tamil names. I have used the writers place-names website as well as other sources for some of my work related to tourism. What Dharmawardana points out is the closeness of the Tamil and Sinhala forms of most place names, and the need to not to loose history.

      If you call a place Batticaloa, that is ethnofacism. But if you call it either Mattakkalppu or Madakalapuwa, it works for both Tamils and Sinhalese. The same is true for names in the south. If you walk around in Dehiwala you see name boards (even in English) where the name is written in the tamilized form “Dehiwalai”. (incidentally, kotahena is NOT kottan-chennai. That may seem correct only if you don’t understand good Tamil or even sinhala).

      So what is this “Aryan solution” mentioned by cincinnatus? Every destination plate on buses have tamilized forms in the south. I personally like to see the same thing happening in the North.

      But cincnnatus seems to be irritated by it. This type of work was actually began by Tamil historians and English antiquarian civil servants. The Tigers didn’t like it because they had this theory of “exclusive” Tamil homelands. So they banished the muslims and the sinhalese. The Tamils do have a homeland, but it is not exclusive, — in fact it has to be inclusive in my view, if the Tamil homeland is to succeed .

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        Firenze being Florence in English texts isn’t racism sir. Please note that the English aren’t part of the country that Firenze belongs to. Please educate yourself with what racism is first of all, instead of trying to suppress your own conscience.

        you say that (incidentally, kotahena is NOT kottan-chennai. That may seem correct only if you don’t understand good Tamil or even sinhala).

        please note that there is no attempt by anyone as you fear to form a ‘Chennai’ (with a capital C as you had written above) in Colombo. the tamil version கொட்டாஞ்சேனை is pronounced කොට්ටාන්චේනෛ, not කොට්ටාන්”චෙන්නෛ”. Please get rid of this fear of other people and learn about the fear mongers that you read.

        The Aryan solution sounds to me like establishing constitutional superiority for one people by suppressing the other by saying there exist robots that would help them cross the road.

        Your personal wish that you want to see යාපනය instead of යාල්ප්පානම් in the name boards of buses running in the north is perfectly acceptable to all the tamils because everybody knows that you guys are linguistically more comfortable ending the words with a vowel sound in contrast to a consonant like in tamil and it’s perfectly justifiable that dutugemunu of sinhala is duttakaimunu in tamil, just like Joseph is Giuseppe in italian and josé in spanish. btw, is your wish on bus name plates yet to come true?

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    Good article,
    Who Should Decide On The 13th Amendment ? none but people of this country ,13A came from nowhere, included in the constitution by force, so no wonder it’s a waste of paper only, never implemented from 1987 todate meaningfully, except PC’s white elephants ,heavy burden on exchequer, yet to see any damn PC in Northern province after 22 years from 1987, possible at least election since the Ghost of Terror (cause for 13A) eradicated hard way through bullet only in 2009.
    So what this joke of keeping 13A now ,rejected by Sun God V.Prabha & their political wing TNA long ago, Sinhala people never wanted,
    just abolish 13A the white elephant.

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    Only bankrupt political rejects ,”leftovers” of “left” who cannot win single parliamentary seat out of 225 on their own are interested in damn 13A.
    These bankrupt political “leftover” jokers like Vasu,DEW,Tissa should never be accommodated by SLFP in parliament giving free seats.

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      ah.. the democrazy where the numerical majority suppresses the minorities :D

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        Our left leaders have policies very different to the world left leaders. take those China. Leftist programs have in fact looked for even going beyond national barriers and working at the level of international workers organizations.
        Chnina believes in a centralized policy, and NOT a devolved-control policy. It wants Tibet and Taiwan under its wing. So I think the writer Dharmawardana is correct. The small number of left leaders we have in Sri lanka have got cornered into the present ethnic policy that is contrary to the usual left thinking where constitutions retain central power to ensure that progressive forces are not sabotaged by capitalist or colonial forces.

        The Lanka Leftists very unfortunately got cornered because of the ill-fated Sinhala-Tamil parity policy and its brusque abandonment by the leaders, leaving the followers in the political wilderness, splintered into various fragments, but committed to what they had posed themselves to be satisfying minority rights’. They still have not recovered from it all.

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    If you were forced to accept 13th amendment by India why did not you refuse that time? Since GOSL wanted India to go against LTTE, GOSL kept mum, had you denied that time, India would not have gone against LTTE and the story would have been very different by now.

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      no, it all started in 1956 because there were no google translator and too many satellites and mobile phone signal towers so suppressing minority had to be done in an ugly way. now technology is there so we can resolve the issue, but still suppressing the minority :D

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    Dear Prof: I think you live within four walls of a deep Well: you say that North does not generates any income and depends on South: please leave it for them : they will make it like a Singapore with money they have today with more than one million in Europe alone.

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      The North had it under local control (de facto Eelam) for 30 years, and got vast amounts of funds from Canada, USA, Germany etc., had a peace accord 9first guaranteed by the Indians, then by the Norwegians), but instead of converting the place into a Singapore, it became what it became. read

      Neither Tiger nor Lion: A Suffering Tamil Voice of Reason from Diaspora Land

      A Tamil in UK who must remain Anonymous … responding to Tamil nationalist commemorations of the Tiger and Tamil dead and to a photograph by Robert Pinney [see below] depicting this event in mid-May 2013**

      It really bothers me that the protest of ‘Tamils… gathered around photographs of those killed during the Sri Lankan civil war’ is being symbolized by people carrying the LTTE flag. Anyone who protests that massacres of Tamils in 2009 should by no means do so under the Tiger flag. In 2009, the Tigers forced innocent Tamil civilians to remain in the Vanni – under pain of death. When I was working in the Vanni, I began to truly sympathize with the Tamils who stayed behind in Sri Lanka. They lost EVERYTHING under the Tigers and the GOSL 31-MAAVEERAR EXHIBITION, Batticaloa, A shed with garlanded photographs of maaveerar, Batticaloa locality, c. 2004 Continue reading →
      http://thuppahi.wordpress.com/

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    It is not about giving Tamils a devolution package, but about ensuring basic rights from a humanitarian perspective is given to a people who are being to this day subjected and treated worse than animals. Therefore the 13th amendment goes to the heart of basic human rights; the politics of it does not really matter. What matters and counts most is basic rights to an underprivileged people who deserve to be treated as human beings, not animals as the majority Singhalese people and their government are doing at present.

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      Unfortunately, it does not transfer power to the people. It transfers power to local big shots who will continue to oppress the Vanni people. Here is an interesting quote

      The Northern provincial council, if constituted, will plunge the North back into dark ages. Angered politicians of the south will cut the flow of capital for building the modern infrastructure that the North never had, or was dismantled by the Tigers. The way forward for the Tamils of the North is not that charted by DJ or the Thimpu. The Northern Tamils must emulate the Colombo Tamils, and develop their commerce and industry, hand in hand with the Sinhalese and Muslims, to create a vibrant tapestry of cultures rather than the narrow mono-culture proposed by Jayatilleke.

      from the following article
      http://www.srilankaguardian.org/2013/05/the-13th-amendment-from-perspective-of.html

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        nonis, then do you imply that gaining independence from our former british masters was of no use for ‘people’?

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    Absolutely.

    People should vote in a referendum to keep or remove 13 amendment.

    I see no use of it. I’m sure most Sri Lankans agree. In a democratic country there is a way to make decisions – lets consult the people in a vote!!

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      good job stating the obvious. now the question was who are to vote for whose rights.

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    DEAR Professor Chandre Dharmawardena,

    I admire your arguments. I don’t know how many people understood your logic and arguments. Some may call you as a nationalist, racist or any other name though you born in 19th – 20th century border you thoughts are about 21st century technology and unification of nations administered by the majority. In coming centuries we expect more advance technologies and it is going to be very easy.

    As you have highlighted we have to live in a interconnected world and if language is no matter then why can’t Sri Lanka be ruled by United Kingdom because most of us are fluent in English and it can be easily translated into any language (Sinhala, Tamil, Arabic) and they have a better democracy than ours. We don’t need to have these leftists, rightists, BBS, TNA, UNP, and SLFP and so on.
    If there is terrorism of JVP or LTTE or BBS or from any modaya’s they will deal better than ours.

    If you think that UK is far away why not India because we all came from India and our languages are theirs, our religions are theirs.

    What is your thoughts on this Prof.?

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      most of us are fluent in english? did you go to a private school? or is it your inferiority complex writing this comment to make an impression, possibly, to your western friends.

      “unification of majority administered by majority” sounds so sweet you?

      You say, “English and it can be easily translated into any language (Sinhala, Tamil, Arabic)”. are you living in your own imaginations, like your professor who thinks Germans and Japanese didn’t use solar panels alone because of aesthetic reasons? :D

      the good professors futuristic (lol) thinking and his ability to make sense and a logical presentation is documented at

      both in the article and the comments section, especially towards the end.

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        Dear disappoint,
        I am dis appointed with you because you haven’t read the article and my comment. I raised a question to the author (Prof) that If we can resolve the Tamil Sinhala problem by adopting the technology, we can find the solution to all problems in Sri lanka by handing back the power to British. Stupid prof. says technology is the solution to solve language problem. He thinks it is communication problem between A & B. There are wider issues such as discrimination, Sinhalaisation, militarization, security etc and we need to find solutions how two different identities can work together for a united island of Sri Lanka instead of oppressing one community by other community.

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          Each problem has to be tackled one at a time. One of the problems is the inability of tamils and Sinhalese to communicate. I agree with the prof. that it can be solved today, using modern cell-phone technology. The code for Sinhala to Tamil has not been produced so far by but neural-net algorithms are well understood and can be rapidly implemented. As for the other problems that you have mentioned, they too can be tackled one by one. If you have to break a bundle of sticks, you take them one by one. The constitutional changes in giving power to the North will NOT solve the problems of the majority of the tamils who now live in Colombo, galle, NuwaraEliya, and the Hill country, or in different places in the Eastern province.
          Furthermore, if the TNA does not support the 13th, and if the rural Sinhalese do not support the 13th, you cannot implement it because some Colombo leftists (who have no votes) favour it.

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            Bodhi

            “and if the rural Sinhalese do not support the 13th,”

            The Sinhalese never supported 13th Amendment however they enjoy benefit out of albeit at a limited level.

            If both Sinhala/Tamil stupids don’t want it why keep it in the statute books? Scrap it.

            Those who opposed it now seem to be enjoying the benefits including the JVP (which violently opposed it and in principle it still continue to oppose it) hence they will ensure the continuation of much weaker form of devolution the 13th Amendment.

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            what i say is that first let us solve the translation issue inside the european union and learn how mature the technological delusion you’re proposing is.

            The code for Sinhala to Tamil has not been produced so far by but neural-net algorithms are well understood and can be rapidly implemented.
            I don’t understand why you have develop neural net algorithms specific to sinhala tamil translations. if that’s successful (please check the adaptive learning algorithms used by google translator, i don’t remember the link) why then the europeans are still struggling? btw, i too have google transltor app on my android? think you can fool everyone just because you throw some words like ‘carnot’s theorem’, ‘e=mcsquared’ and ‘neural network algorithm’?

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              correction: I don’t understand why you have develop the code to implement neural net algorithms for sinhala tamil translations

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          Ajith, i’m sorry sometimes i can’t focus enough to read the sarcasm in comments. my disappointment is to blame.

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    13 amendment is useless today. It was a war time solution not suitable for peace time.

    But it didn’t work even in wartime!

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      Europe is already bankrupt.

      North america is slowly reaching that point.

      Tamils if they pay all the costs attributed to the administrative costs of the 13th amendment will they pay enough Taxes to maintain it ?

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        JimSofty

        “Tamils if they pay all the costs attributed to the administrative costs of the 13th amendment will they pay enough Taxes to maintain it ?”

        Let the Tamils deal with it. I just happened to remember that there are other Provincial Councils which have been in existence (whether those councils effectively serving the people is another matter) since 1988.

        Could you tell us how have they managed all these years without handouts from you?

        By the way remember both the Sinhalese and Tamils have not paid a single rupee to my people as rent for the past 2,500 years. When do you intent to settle your debt?

        Free riders.

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      I don’t see any peace now. Peace does not mean no bombs and shells. It is to do with people.

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    All future political solutions must involve Chinese representations as well. As the only Asian superpower and only Asian UN Security Council Permanent Member, China must be consulted on these matters.

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      ah..the outside solutions! first it was india, then norway, then the UN and China :D it’s not going to be too before the chinese are blamed for having given a sane proposal.

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        Don’t worry. Rajapaksa has promised a “home-made” solution. As someone in these comments have said, the main force behind the 13th at the moment is Mahinda rajapaksa. When he gives a `homemade solution’, all the leftist leaders like Vasu, Dew, and Tissa will also agree with him. Even if they leave, they get a good retirement package.

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    Inddeed one can wonder why Michael Roberts did not follow up with another esaay detailing the similarity between the work of certain segments of the Sinhala intelligientsia and the Nazis.H could have begun with that homeless wanderer who found a homein the work of Hitler et al and spoke passionately about
    the “pure Aryan race of the Sinhalese”etc!
    I suppose Roberts has his loyalties too!

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      So, every one except you are a Nazi? You are the one who talked of Aryan solution simply because someone pointed out that most places have two or three names. So does Brussells, which becomes Bruxelle for the Belgian falms, and something slightly different for the Belgian vallons. Prof. karthigesu Indrapala was chased out by the Tigers because he also worked on place names. Even his thesis is said to be missing from the London University as they wanted to suppress information. It is not these people who study history but the Tamil nationalists who were the first to start chasing people (Sinhalese, and Muslms) out of the North. So I think you know what this Aryan solution of your is.
      Don’t accuse Roberts and others. These place names prove that all these people (sinhalese, tamils) lived peacefully there.

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        King Soloman

        “Prof. karthigesu Indrapala was chased out by the Tigers because he also worked on place names.”

        Could you site evidence that LTTE chased him out.

        Could you also site evidence of his work on places names.

        On places names , I will make your life bit easy.

        My elders refer you to Prof P Pushparanam’s paper

        “Tamil Place Names as Gleaned from the Brahmi Inscriptions of Sri Lanka”

        published in

        Kaveri: Studies in Epigraphy, Archaeology and History : Professor Y. Subbarayalu Felicitation Volume.

        “Even his thesis is said to be missing from the London University as they wanted to suppress information.”

        Who did tell you this?

        My elders are also aware that “A lie told often enough becomes the truth”. It is similar to your Aryan/Sinhala/Buddhist heritage.

        If you are not pursuing truth its alright, have little bit of fun.

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          Knowledgeable people have discussed Prof. Poathmanathan’s work. Some of it is good, and some of it is based on Tamil Nationalism and without basis. The felicitation volume unfortunately is NOT a peer-reviewed document, and what is in it is in my view very poor scholarship.
          There is a lot of critical discussion on Pathmanathan’s work learned Journals. It is not only the Thesis at the London University that is missing, but also related books (e.g., the antiquarian volume containing Horsberg’s article that used to be available at the Colombo Public Library). All this is discussed and you can find details of them from the Edit columns under placenames in the Wikipedia – the political cyber-gangs from both sides destroyed the good articles that existed and now we have utterly biased articles in Wikipedia.
          (under the name of an editor called, e.g., pro-LTTE editor taprobane, or pro-Sinhala editor Lahiru).
          I will locate more detailed references if you send me an e-mail to kav-silu@hotmail.com. Perhaps Prof. Dharmawardana’s website (dh-web.org/pace.names/) may also have some information. But that website is hard to search.

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            Yogi

            I assume your comment above (June 2, 2013 6:40 pm) is a response to mine earlier (Native Vedda – June 2, 2013 4:55 pm).

            If indeed it was aimed at me, let me tell you nowhere in my comment have I mentioned Prof. Poathmanathan’s work. I am not sure how you managed to bring him into your response.

            “The felicitation volume unfortunately is NOT a peer-reviewed document, and what is in it is in my view very poor scholarship.”

            Reread my comment below I am copying it for your convenience in case you if you misread it again:

            “”””My elders refer you to Prof P Pushparanam’s paper

            “Tamil Place Names as Gleaned from the Brahmi Inscriptions of Sri Lanka”

            published in

            Kaveri: Studies in Epigraphy, Archaeology and History : Professor Y. Subbarayalu Felicitation Volume.””””

            This voluminous book does include several highly acclaimed researched papers written by reputed intellectually honest academics unlike the cowboy historians of Sri Lanka.

            FYI I copy a brief review published in The Hindu Dec 03, 2002:

            Felicitation volume

            KAVERI — Studies in Epigraphy, Archaeology and History: S. Rajagopal — Editor; Published by Panpattu Veliyeettagam. For copies the Editor, 8, First Street, Venkateswara Nagar, Adyar, Chennai-600020. Rs. 1,000.

            THIS FELICITATION volume, brought out in honour of Professor Y. Subbarayalu of the Tamil University, Thanjavur, carries 65 papers arranged in four parts — Epigraphy and archaeology; History; Art and religion; Language and culture besides 12 of his valuable papers on topics like the Pulanguruchi inscriptions, the Chola state, Sale deeds in Chola inscriptions, Land measurements in Chola inscriptions.

            His contributions to the study of Tamil inscriptions are commendable and are always marked by deep and analytical study of even obscure names and terms that occur in them, particularly pertaining to political geography, administrative and economic institutions and status, nature of state and interpreting them in a broader conceptual framework.

            The volume has an impressive collection of interesting papers on a variety of topics and will be a welcome addition to historical studies.

            K. V. RAMAN

            ___________

            “It is not only the Thesis at the London University that is missing”

            Again I assume that you are referring Prof Indrapala’s thesis. Have you ever contacted University of London to confirm your recurring nightmare?

            If not why are you repeating the same lie over and above the limit?

            “but also related books (e.g., the antiquarian volume containing Horsberg’s article that used to be available at the Colombo Public Library).”

            I don’t believe any Sri Lanky worth one’s salt would steal it unless there is a black market for it. Its up to the police to investigate such thefts, and there are millions of them, including treasures under the ground and inside the Temples.

            “the political cyber-gangs from both sides destroyed the good articles that existed and now we have utterly biased articles in Wikipedia”

            How would one know whether an article is good or not? If you are conditioned to believe in something, you will always look for evidence to confirm what your conditioned believe to be right.

            Please reread my comments and respond to it. I am not in hurry. You take your own time.

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        calling england engalantha or ingilaanthu aren’t absurd ideas. but claiming the ownership to england because it appeared in an ancient travelogue or a epic and ‘archaelologically’ evacuating the people of england and their cultural elements is.

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    In a single statement, let us agree that the 13th amendment is NOT A HOME GROWN SOLUTION. It is an Indian Trojan Horse to weaken SriLankan’s unitary status and must not be accepted without a referendum on it.

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      The best home grown solution is to massacre all Tamils and muslims in Sri Lanka. Already you have halved the Tamil population and it won’t take much time to finish it off.

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        no, once the cow’s flesh is finished then the worms will have to breed on themselves. so preservation of species is essential for sustenance of the ecological dynamics.

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          *breed–> feed

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    all these gamvasiyos write racism by still complaining about their inferiority complex they had while living in europe and elsewhere. and keep pouring their racism onto the real Sri Lankan village dwelling gamvasiya’s head so that they keep him in the dark forever so that these hypocrites can enjoy, with his racist votes and his so-engineered lack of taste for the metropolitan luxury, their normal lives in the western countries speaking english and french for a living and have fixed assets generating revenue in colombo, like the gamey ipadichchca weerakatiya gang does, and thus be able to purchase holiday itineraries with first-class air tickets to spend their summer holidays back in the real gama.

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    I only want to add a few points correcting some mistakes and over-statements in my article. They are the following:

    (i)the article appears as if I am negative and derisive towards the Leftist leaders and the so-called “left-over Leftists”. I regret that impression very much. In spite of various short-coming, I think they have done yo-man service to Sri Lanka.

    This article addressed an issue where the leftists failed. The Old left failed (fortunately) in their attempt to carry out a revolution, but they did create an evolutionary change that truly transformed political thinking in the south. The same effect did not take place in the North; H. Abeywikrama, Kumar David and others have discuss why that was so in greater detail – but briefly, it was because the Leaders of the North (who lived in Colombo) were ultra-conservatives who regarded Marxism with suspicion and viewed the Leftist leaders as people who should really be in jail! Sebastian Rasalingam has also discussed such issues, of course from his more limited perspective of caste discrimination and the rigidity of the social order. Sebastian R’s views on most matters are only a personally coloured partial truth, but they need to be included within all other partial truths that pass off as political analysis.

    2). The current left leaders could do a lot more constructive things, but they have got side-tracked into ethnic politics because of the history of the `parity of status’ policy that I reviewed in the article. That was a consequence of the nature of the (urban) working class that the Left represented.

    In more recent times, Tissa Vitarana was the minister of science but science, technology, and the vision needed to move the country forward was not his main concern. Instead, it was the dead-horse known as the ARPC that he laboured on! Today Vasudeva Nanayakkara (who did great things stopping various frauds of a previous administration) is trying to make Lanka tri-Lingual with Canadian aid. Canada has spent billions of dollars over four decades, with bonuses and incentives, immersion programs for kids, parents, teachers, civil servants etc.,
    and yet, Englsih Canada is 80% unilingual Englsih after 40 years of trying!!!

    The whole point is, people learn languages only if they have a practical use for it (or because they enjoy it). Parents prefer to teach their children Englsih, rather than the language of the other ethnic groups, even in affluent countries. Learning Englsih is a must in Sri Lanka, and that is what Vasudeva N must push.
    But language translation at the small-business level is totally achievable via cell-phone technology. I see that the person who writes comments under the name “Disappointed” (who I suspect is once again Marquis de Laplace that I encountered in the solar panel discussion) has raised doubts about translation algorithms.
    I see one or two people have mentioned neural nets in their comments.
    I have discussed neural nets and adaptive algorithms at a semi-popular (and semi-technical level in small print) in sec. 2.2.5 et sec., of my book “A physicist’s view of matter and mind”. I also discussed Sinhala-Tamil implementation in an article that may be accessed from Michael Robert’s website [or as a pdf-document from href=”http://dh-web.org/place.names/posts/triling.pdf ]; a more brief discussion was given in 22-Nov-2011 Island newspaper article.

    Unlike the vast (futile) effort that would be needed to convert a population to tri-lingualism, a fraction of the cost of just one mig-fighter plane bought for the air-force would be more than enough to develop a good sinhala-tamil neural-net-based translator (After all, the war is now over). Alternatively, a low-tech solution where translation kiosks could be set up by private business (in places like law-courts), together with government franchised places as well. There are so many innovate ways to solve these problems, while the LEAST PRODUCTIVE method is political agitation.

    3). Finally, the main topic of my article about the 13th amendment and the North was, who should decide? We or they?. It turns out that defining “we”, or “they”, i.e, who is or is not a stake-holder, is even more difficult than any other aspect of the 13th amendment, unless you clearly take a racist position of defining voter=born-tamil, and non-voter=other. Even if you are willing to argue for that apartheid-like position, it is like planning to bell the cat.

    So discussing various aspects of devolution with police and land powers is some what like discussing various aspects of the bell that one is going to put around the cat. Provincial councils (without the bell) already exist, and you just have to look at their current state to be utterly dis-satisfied with them. In fact, we are not talking of belling the cat, but giving swords to some nine monkey-like councils. The problem is not peculiar to the north, since any council may go under a Mervyn de Silva.

    Further, they will not save any ordinary civilian who may be judged to be exploitable (e.g., because s/he is a minority member) from police or other abuse and harassment. Given that the total number of Tamil-speaking people in the hill country, greater Colombo, and outer capitals is larger than in the North, ensuring justice and fair treatment for Tamil-speakers via PCs seems to be a very difficult proposition.

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    May I recommend the following book to PRo.Dharmawardene?

    The Psychoanalysis of Racism, Revolution and Nationalism
    By Richard A. Koenigsberg

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      To cincinnatus.
      I have the book by By Richard A. Koenigsberg, Psychoanalysis of Racism, Revolution and Nationalism and know it well. It came out in 1987. It is an excellent book. I have been meaning to write a companion note to it from a complementary perspective (socio-thermodynamic point of view), because I think nationalism is like dynamite (a system off-equilibrium with a lot of stored up energy). If it can be channeled and controlled, dynamite can can do good, or be very dangerous.

      The etymology of the place-names in the north was not thought of as a part of ethno-nationalism till recently. It is an old, valid historical subject, and could become a part of nationalism if you try to force one name and exclude the other. The exclusive-Homeland people have that attitude. Our view is that names like Mannarama,(Mannaram), Madakalapuwa,(Mattakkallappu), Ranamaduwa, (Iranamadu), Sinhalwadiya (Chenkaladi), Gokanna (Gokarna for Trincomalee) etc., simply show how close the Sinhalese and Tamils have been, and how long they have been in co-existence. They have been in it (or at it!) for centuries. Ponnambalam was right when he said that the whole of Sri Lanka is a homeland of the Tamils, and by working with the UNP he accepted that the Sinhalese are in it. But Ponna was labeled a `traitor’ by V Chelvanaygam in 1949. That is the extreme language of pathological nationalism identified by Koenigsberg.

      I was drawn to place-names studies by a Mahaweli Engineer (Mr. Manamperi), and by some foreign students from UK and France doing ethno-historical research in Colombo in the 1970s (J Serge Francois, Janice Jiggns, Jane Russell, Geof Bamford, and others), and from my own interest in ancient languages (Indo-European and Dravidian). The place-names show in detail the validity of the classic view of Kathigesu Indrapala and other earlier scholars who only studied a limited subset of names.

      Excessive nationalism is a disease. Sri Lanka caught the disease because of the politics of Ponna, Banada, Chelva and others. But they couldn’t have done it but for the fact that every time the minorities protested, the majority replied with greater violence. (J.R.Jayawardena was in that with K.M.P.Rajaratne pushing violent reaction). Such violence was countered by more violence from each side. Then Tamil nationalism put out a small 10% people in harm’s way against a virtual 80% majority militarily. Even if the Tigers had won the Eelam IV war and had Rajapaksa lost, there would have been another three decades of continual war.

      When we were young people everyone in my circle were fellow-travelers of the LSSP because we thought LSSP leaders were principled men who would ensure democracy (a good sign of democracy is how minorities are treated). Their `parity of status for Sinhala and Tamil’ seemed to be a great gentlemanly act. We soon learned that this was a sham, a tactic adopted for the short-term revolutionary end (because the GCSU demographics needed parity), and because they did not care about the electoral outcome. Their ethnic politics was not honest, and was a pretense based on `end justifies the means’. The left could have solved the ethnic problem if it had been on the democratic path right from the start instead of planning to power-grab by Bolshevik-revolutionary methods.

      I am afraid the 13th amendment, even if fully applied, would do little to ensure minority rights and good governance in Sri Lanka. The rule of law would be even more enfeebled by even more politicians having a finger in the pie, now at the provincial level.

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        to Chandre Dharmawardana,

        you think you might suddenly become a nice guy because you put majority replied with greater violence in bold. yes, accepting the truth is the first step, but using it as a cover for your further sinister moves ain’t. at least Ponna, Banada, Chelva and others are not known have hosted such hostile prejudices and enmity towards others as you do in

        The BBS is a political movement crystallizing around extremist advocates of anti-Islam which is a symptom of the increasing anger of the populace to the open face of islam, with loud-speaker prayers five times a day, tent-like dresses and other cultural practices going back to the middle ages, enclaves of Saudi-funded Muslim quarters appearing in municipalities like Beruwala or Kattankudy. (creating inter-Muslim feuds), as well as the increasing demand for the Sharia law.

        The same back lash has happened in `liberal’ democracies like Denmark, Canada, and France. In the US, the covert attack on Muslims is led by the US government using the `home-land security act’. How Muslim communities have been attacked using government agencies has been documented in the `dispatches’ series by investigative journalist Rick MacInnes-Rae of the CBC (see http://www.cbc.ca/dispatches/). The US government ensured that Muslim communities are broken up, Mosques closed, and the IRS deployed to heavily tax such establishments to bankruptcy or raise interminable questions about their tax status forcing them to use very expensive defense lawyers.

        The reaction in France has been firm, open and legislative, with the Hijaab banned,;and public Islam is forced to `avoir le visage conformant a la culture francaise’. Denmark and Canada have introduced similar, but less over-whelming legislation to satisfy the demands of majorities.

        Where Sri Lanka has failed is in its failure to maintain law and order, , and in not introducing suitable legislation that would calm the fears of the majority. The latter is a consequence of the government depending on Muslim MPs to maintain its strong showing in parliament.

        What should Sri Lanka do? It too should debate the matters openly and pass what ever legislation is believed to satisfy the wishes of the people.
        The quality of these laws (that is, there level of justice) will depend on the level of education of the legislators, their level of exposure to the wide world, , and on the foresightedness of the legislators who should also ensure that foreign vested interests (be they religious or political) should not be allowed to pump money into the country and buy up support for foreign religious movements or political movements. However, once the laws are passed, the laws have to be strictly enforced without corruption.

        The existence of the similar or more virulent Islamophobic movements in far more affluent (allegedly liberal) western countries with catholic or Protestant majorities proves that we have to look beyond Buddhist militancy to understand the phenomenon. So, it is NOT a case of `preaching’ and sermonizing by `good monks’ (as emphasized in this article), or `vigils’ against the BBS by English-speaking holier-than-thou individuals that would help. We need more definitive steps.

        What is needed is
        eliminating the sociological causes behind the phenomenon; viz.,:
        eliminating the destabilizing influx of funds from rich Middle-eastern religious movements,
        tempering the rapid propagation of social modes new to Sri Lanka that shock the people (hijaab, loud-speaker prayers, or for that matter loud-speaker Pirith). Such legislation exists not only in the West, but also in places like Singapore.
        Converting movements like the BBS into social safety valves where they are allowed to vent their views while the government MAINTAINS LAW AND ORDER AT ALL COSTS,
        Recognizing that quasi-religious movements also have large economic agendas, and the BBS seems to have attacked economic targets (halal, Muslim shops) even more than religious targets!

        and you come to preach others? nationalism is bad. but you are the worst kind of ethnofascist nationalist undercover which is apparent in your writings.

        Mannaram(Mannarama), Mattakkallappu (Madakalapuwa), Iranamadu (Ranamaduwa), Chankaladi(Sinhalwadiya), Thirukonamalai (Gokanna for Trincomalee) etc., simply show how close the Sinhalese and Tamils have been, and how long they have been in co-existence and how you are now trying to sew the seeds of owning all the places for yourself. If the english speakers want to call kurunegala and batticaloa the way they want it, so be it. what’s your problem, you can always call nallur the way you want and print name plates for buses, no one should object. and tamilizing southern names doesn’t amount trying to own those places, unlike you have been pushing your agenda in subtle ways. calling Lanka ilankai will also be a problem for you?

        Let us say Chelva called Banda traitor, then what did you imply about whole ethnic groups?

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        your playing of rasalingam card is also very well known for your justification of the militarized north by saying elsewhere Thus we see that the lower castes welcome the army since it does NOT practice caste discrimination. who suggested that caste discrimination is still so prevalant in jaffna born’s as it was the case between uda-rata and pahath-rata’s and in the case of colonial discrimination of low caste sinhalese? when your society progresses, others’ does too.

        i will not project myself as a pseudo-etymologist (or coffee break researcher as some put it), or pseudo-historian as you try do in being the forensic expert that judges real forensic examiners’ expertise. so i will leave etymology and history to those who are professional at it.

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    “But language translation at the small-business level is totally achievable via cell-phone technology. I see that the person who writes comments under the name “Disappointed” (who I suspect is once again Marquis de Laplace that I encountered in the solar panel discussion) has raised doubts about translation algorithms.

    I have discussed neural nets and adaptive algorithms at a semi-popular (and semi-technical level in small print) in sec. 2.2.5 et sec., of my book”

    lolwut? once again an attempt to sell the book :D

    no answer to why the google translator fails within the european union itself for both technical/ bureaucratic documents and ordinary everyday speech! ask a french tourist who visited italy, before you learn about his experience in germany and sweden. my google translator android app on my ‘cell phone’ also has text speech capacity but still the back end in california fails after years of bot-like ‘learning’ and ‘scanning’ through standard translation for hundreds of thousands of documents in archives and crowd-sourced training. and our solar panel professor’s neural nets are going to pattern match to do the NLP! if your so interested in fantasies and futurism, why don’t you demonstrate your algorithms with some Ogden’s Basic English like reduced versions of klingon and the language of the navi people of avatar? :D

    Gamvesiya, it’s funny but true that you and Laplace both are very familiar to me and you guys are quite popular now in certain cyber circles that i am part of. But seeing your rants elsewhere, i’m sad that Laplace felt sorry for you and dropped it forever :D Finally, all your so-called innovative solutions are only excuses to maintain your sinhala superiority customs in this country, which is racism.

    as a personal response, tell me when did you start writing racism in public with your real name from being a global gamvasiya then i will tell you why i have to be a ‘disappointed’ netvasiya living in a country full of white van goons. and all what i quoted was your original statements! so come out of the closet! :D

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      *text to speech and speech to text capacity

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