13 December, 2017

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2017: Lesson From Fidel For The Lankan Left 

By Dayan Jayatilleka

Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

Dr. Dayan Jayatilleka

It wasn’t a happy time, believe me!…their humanitarian paratroopers, human rights combined with the right of intervention as the sole means of assistance, the full-bellied Western fortress giving moral lessons to those starving the world over…the cult of national, racial, sexual, religious and cultural identities seeking to undo the rights of the universal …” – Alain Badiou, ‘Second Manifesto for Philosophy’

In one sense we didn’t lose Fidel in 2016 because his example and words are indelible, just as those of Che Guevara. As the Sandinista Commandante and poet Tomas Borge (later, a diplomat) said when his jailor brought news that his leader Carlos Fonseca had been killed: “No, he is one of the dead who never die”. This is true several times over of Fidel. He has been immortalized like some Old Testament Jewish prophet or Catholic saint. As Raul Castro said “Fidel, undefeated, has left us, but his spirit of struggle will permanently remain in the conscience…” (Dec 27, 2016)

Fidel was a major influence in forming our values, our political consciousness and our way of being in the world. He was the archetypal Rebel, the archetypal Revolutionary and the paradigmatic leader-statesman. Nothing sums up Fidel’s greatness as much as the fact that he was Che Guevara’s beloved leader. Jean-Paul Sartre described Che as “the most complete human being of his time” and Raul Castro called him “the paradigm of that highest level of the human species” (1991). It is that human being who in his utterly poignant farewell letter, described Fidel in the following words:

…I am also proud of having followed you without hesitation, of having identified with your way of thinking and of seeing and appraising dangers and principles…I carry to new battlefronts the faith that you taught me, the revolutionary spirit of my people, the feeling of fulfilling the most sacred of duties: to fight against imperialism wherever it may be…If my final hour finds me under other skies, my last thought will be of this people and especially of you. I am grateful for your teaching and your example, to which I shall try to be faithful up to the final consequences of my acts.” (Ernesto Che Guevara, Farewell Letter to Fidel, 1965)fidel-pic-via-jvp-sri-lanka-fb

Photo via Facebook JVP

While Sri Lankan political society—the State and every political party from Right to Left (except the non-TNA Northern ‘ultras’) — commemorated Fidel, I was appalled but not entirely surprised by the silence of the Sri Lankan civil society intelligentsia. Almost without exception, the civil society progressive pundits, the intellectuals, social scientists, ideologues, cultural and artistic personalities, and NAM era ex-diplomats, including the soi disant radicals, leftists, feminists, civil society activists and the left-leaning, didn’t write or say a word in public in commemoration of Fidel, quite unlike their counterparts all over the world!

One of the facets of the prism through which I view things is what did Fidel say or do in a similar situation, or how does one apply what he said – the basic principle involved—to the problem at hand. This should come as no surprise because my own intellectual contribution to a universal theme and topic, that of violence, has been inextricably intertwined with the figure of Fidel.

In words I shall treasure, Richard Falk, globally respected thinker, Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton (having taught there for forty years), author, co-author or editor of more than 40 books, and former UN Special Rapporteur on Occupied Palestinian Territories, has warmly cited me and Marjorie Cohn, Emeritus professor of law and former President of the National Lawyers’ Guild, USA, in his essay written after the death of Fidel Castro in the Foreign Policy Journal as well as on his blog.

In a 2,000 plus word essay entitled “On the Death of Fidel Castro’ Falk writes as follows:

In contrast to generally condescending appraisals in the West, I call attention to two extraordinary essays of appreciation written by cherished friends. One by Sri Lanka’s lead diplomat and cultural critic, Dayan Jayatilleka, published as an opinion piece in the Colombo Telegraph under the fitting title, “A Farewell to Fidel: The Last of Epic Heroes,” Nov. 26, 2016. Dayan not only celebrates Castro’s heroic revolutionary achievement in transforming Cuba from a gangster state identity in the Batista period to a vital outpost of Third World progressive ideals. He also underscores the admirable ethics of violence that guided Castro’s revolutionary practice in ways that showed disciplined respect for the innocence of civilian life. For greater detail see Jayatilleka’s fine appreciative study, Fidel’s Ethics of Violence: The Moral Dimension of the Political Thought of Fidel Castro (London: Pluto Press, 2007). This conception of the ethics of political violence has been essentially absent from the manner in which the struggle between terrorist groups and sovereign states has been waged in various combat zones, especially since the 9/11 attacks. Jayatilleka’s assessments have been confirmed and extended in the recently published book by Nick Hewlett entitled Blood and Progress: Violence in the Pursuit of Emancipation (Edinburgh, Scotland: University of Edinburgh Press, 2016).”

In order to arrive at a Fidelista perspective, one has to apply Fidel—and in order to apply Fidel one has to understand the very crux of Fidel’s ideology and praxis. No one is more credentialed to do this than Ernesto Che Guevara and he writes in the farewell letter to Fidel that “…I carry to new battlefronts the faith that you taught me, the revolutionary spirit of my people, the feeling of fulfilling the most sacred of duties: to fight against imperialism wherever it may be…” (Guevara, Ibid)

Thus, for Guevara, “to fight against imperialism wherever it may be” lies at the heart of Fidelismo. How did Fidel translate this task into the very different post–Soviet period of contemporary history?

Margot Pepper whose book on Cuba was shortlisted for the 2006 American Book Award, quotes Fidel’s last speech at the Sao Paulo forum which he and Lula jointly founded after the USSR fell. (One of my most prized possessions is the photograph of President Lula browsing my book on Fidel, with me—at the time, Chairman of the ILO–standing nearby.) Writing that “It is a policy Fidel warned against in the last speech I heard him pronounce live at this Forum”, she reproduces his words as follows:

Nobody can claim that objective or subjective conditions are favorable at this time for building socialism. I believe that at the present time there are other priorities… The most important battle in Latin America today is, in my opinion, to defeat neoliberalism, because if we don’t—we will disappear as independent states and will become more of a colony than the “Third World” countries ever were.

Lenin once wrote that Marx had been mummified; gutted and stuffed so that his thinking could be reduced that that which was compatible with the liberal bourgeoisie. It is important to rescue Fidel Castro from such a fate.

Some wish to reduce Fidel’s revolutionary project to a revolt against a Batista type regime and reduce him to a bourgeois liberal forced into bearing arms by circumstances, while any serious student would recall that the defining period of high Fidelism-Guevarism, from the Declarations of Havana to the Tricontinental and OLAS Conferences, raised the banner of anti-capitalist (i.e. socialist) armed revolution against electoral pseudo-democracies which were puppets of the US, and in which capitalist reform (JFK’s ‘Alliance for Progress’) was part of the counterrevolutionary project. Venezuela was the prime example, and the guerrilla struggle occasioned Regis Debray’s essay “Fidelism: the Long March in Latin America”. Fidelista movements such as the Tupamaros in Uruguay, the Montoneros and the ERP in Argentina, and the ELN and M19 in Colombia were formed and/or revolted against elected regimes, while the Salvadoran FMLN revolutionaries waged war also throughout the elected government of Jose Napoleon Duarte in the early 1980s.

Of course as the Leninist moment passed in Latin America, Fidel changed his strategy, just as Lenin himself changed his strategy after 1920. He changed still further with the dramatic transformation of the world balance of forces after the fall of the USSR which he had predicted. Edward Said refers to a “late style” on the par of important thinkers. Said’s idea is a reworking of the term that appears in the criticism of the artist, that of a “late period”. Said also observed that the late style had a “furrowed’ character. What does Fidel’s late style say that is relevant to Sri Lanka today?

For Fidel the most important battle in the new period of history, the post-Soviet, unipolar period, is “to defeat neoliberalism”, so to forestall the threat that “we will disappear as independent states” and “will become more of a colony than the “Third World” countries ever were.” Fidel’s biographer Ignacio Ramonet, former editor of Le Monde Diplomatique confirms that “Right up until the eve of his death, at 90 years of age, Fidel continued to actively …denounce neoliberal globalization…” (‘The Fidel I Knew’, Granma, Dec 28th 2016)

For Fidel the most serious challenge and danger facing us was to disappear as independent states, becoming more of a colony than third world states had been. We may call this ‘late re-colonization’ or ‘late neo-colonialism’– the latest stage of imperialism, “late imperialism”. For a Fidelista, the most contemporary important task and form of the fight against imperialism is to remain or regain our status as “independent states”. So much for those who think that an independent state is either not worth fighting for, because “states” are bad (unless they are socialist) and/or independence of states is infeasible under globalization (short of a shift to socialism).

Any student of Fidel’s column Reflections which was his main mode of public communication following his retirement in 2006, would know that in his assessment of current world history, the main international factors that he counted upon as positives were the growing strength of China and the resurgence of Russia. The year before he died, writing in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the victory of the Great Patriotic War waged by the Soviet Union against Hitler fascism, Fidel said in a column in Granma:

…Today we are seeing the solid alliance between the people of the Russian Federation and the State with the fastest growing economy in the world: The People’s Republic of China; both countries, with their close cooperation, modern science and powerful armies and brave soldiers constitute a powerful shield of world peace and security, so that the life of our species may be preserved.” (Fidel Castro, Our Right to be Marxist Leninists, May 8th 2015)

If not socialism in the current historical period, what then is the alternative to neoliberal globalization? Samir Amin, one of the world’s greatest Marxian political economists and thinkers, identifies “the best model we have today to respond to imperialism”:

The role of China is very big, because it is, perhaps, the only country in the world today, which has a sovereign project. That means that it is trying to establish a pattern of modern industry, in which of course, private capital has a wide place, but it is under the strict control of the state. Simultaneously it gives a view of the present to the culture. The other pattern of Chinese economy culture is based on family producers. China is walking on two legs: following the traditions and participating globalization. They accept foreign investments, but keep independence of their financial system. The Chinese bank system is exclusively state-controlled. The Yuan is convertible only to a certain extent, but under the control of the bank of China. That is the best model that we have today to respond to the challenge of globalist imperialism.

So much for those Lankan leftists who detest Putin, the Chinese model and Syria’s fight for independence. Thus we may legitimately conclude that the fight against imperialism in the concrete form of the fight for the defense of independent states/state independence, leveraging the strength of China and Russia, was Fidel’s world-historical perspective in his last decade. This must be concretely translated into practice in 2017, Sri Lanka’s Year of Struggle.

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Latest comments

  • 11
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    Whatever Samir Amin says, what we have in China is not a model of socialism.
    Samir Amin despite remarkable theoretical studies has made very poor judgments in recent times. The biggest blunder of all was his endorsement of Egypt’s current dictator.
    I hope that we are not being told that Putin is a socialist in the making of Lenin or Castro for the Lankan left to adore.
    Is DJ’s defence of Syria an excuse for MR regime?

    I do not for a moment reject Russia or Syria or for that matter Zimbabwe or North Korea for their defiance of imperialism; but it is also right to criticize what are anti-people policies under these regimes— bearing in mind however the bigger picture which concerns US imperialist aggression.

    • 0
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      This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

      • 0
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        This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

      • 18
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        Is there anything left of the Sri Lankan “Left”? They are mostly racist Sinhala Buddhists!

        • 4
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          Even the Tamil leftists who held impressive May Day rallies in 2006 in Jaffna, Vavuniya and Matale?

          Racism is often what we imagine in others but fail to notice in us.

  • 0
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

  • 12
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    Good to see you write about Castro policies rather than Sri Lankan politics.Why dont you add a paragraph on how to solve the Sri Lankan racist party politics based on Castro principles?

    • 2
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      Thamilan
      I fully endorse and support your suggestion to Dayan J.
      He is the best person to answer the doubts and perplexity of SL Tamils,why
      Cuba supported MaRa’s policy of denying Tamils their fundamental rights under Fidel.

  • 22
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    It is rediculous how you – a political chameleon who has changed colours from ealom supporting left wing idealist to a media mercenary on Mahintha’s payroll – is talking about learning lessons from Fidel, someone who stuck to his principles like a solid rock until he died. Try to learn some lessons yourself you funny man! :)

  • 13
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    Putin, The Chinese Model and Assad (not to mention Rajapakse) are who Jayathilaka wants us to admire and emulate???? Sounds a bit like Donald Trump!!!

    So what else is new with this guy who is once more using CT to promote himself and his paean to Fidel?

    Old lapdogs never die, they just keep ‘lapping’ away!

  • 14
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    Modern Cuba is the result of five centuries of colonisation; then came Fidel. Young compared to our 25 century Sri Lankan civilisation; but we are still looking for a leader who will unite us all, and set us truly free.

    Little Cuba founded in Colonialism, fighting off Big US founded on mass colonialism. You’ve got to laugh.

    But this happens everywhere; little Lanka fighting big bad India. Little England fighting big bad Europe. Little Singapore had to fight off bid bad Malaysia and Indonesia. What is it that we loathe our neighbours but have happy relations with those far far away?

    The colonisation of South America has been work-in-progress for 5 centuries.The first wave stuffed the Aztecs, shafted the Incans, sacked Cuszco, then went on to screw the Mayans. All the time galleons full of gold and other plunder went back to Spain. Go and admire the pure gold on the altars, walls and ceilings of the magnificent cathedrals of Spain, the mawbima of Fidel’s parents.

    Cuba’s biggest blessing was the total separation of state and religion.Fidel and the party were free had no ‘mahanayakes‘ with their bony hands round the testicles of state. Here in Sri Lanka, we are saddled with the curse of the elected that run the country having to look over their shoulders at the dictates of anything in a saffron robe.

    Never mind noble leftist ideas, for anything to succeed in Sri Lanka it must have the blessings of the Mahanayake’s, and nowadays the BBS (leader Hon. Gnanasara – fresh Presidents Counsellor).

    As an aside, one has to admire DJ’s subtle self promotion slipped in just when you least expected it. Also, the telling picture of a little lad holding up a poster of the great leader; nice to see the young one brainwashed with political shit, to accompany the irrevocable religion that comes with birth.

    Which God should I call on to free us from this madness?

    • 3
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      // As an aside, one has to admire DJ’s subtle self promotion slipped in just when you least expected it. //

      Yup — he did this well. I didn’t see it coming.

    • 0
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      Good that you’ve chosen to gloss over how Cuba became essentially a colony of the Soviet Union. Well done

  • 8
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    There is no one left in the Srilankan left politics to learn about Fiedel Castro or China’s left. What we know about left in Srilanka is dead and we only have fague, racist, corrupt and cruel blood suckers.

  • 0
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    This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our Comment policy.For more detail see our Comment policy https://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/comments-policy-2/

  • 4
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    It’s incredible that Comrade Dayan’s numerous tributes to Fidel have not been met with a single article in the Colombo Telegraph describing the horrors of communism. Am I the only man/woman here who appreciates being free from tyranny? When communism was first explained to me many years ago by a colleague, the initial arguments about “anti-imperialism” and “equality” sounded great. Then he got to the part about not having private property rights and how the state owns everything. I said “stop right there and say no more”. I would encourage anyone on this forum who owns property to examine your property deeds and to reflect on and appreciate the clause where it says “…The Vendor conveys the said land and premises to the Purchaser, absolutely and forever”. Thanks to Fidel and the “Revolution”, the people of Cuba had the “forever” part of their deeds invalidated overnight. The good people of Cuba went to sleep one night in 1959 as free men and free women, owning land and property, and woke up as serfs, subservient to a government.

  • 5
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    Why are left-wing dictators always treated with more reverential respect when they die than right-wing ones, even on the Right? The deaths of dictators like Franco, Pinochet, Somoza are rightly noted with their history of human rights abuses front and centre, but the same treatment is not meted out to left-wing dictators who were just as monstrously cruel to people who opposed their regimes.

    The death of Fidel Castro is a perfect case in point. BBC News described him as ‘one of the world’s longest-serving and most iconic leaders’ only mentioning in the fourth paragraph that ‘Critics saw him as a dictator’. Critics?! What other objective noun is there for a man who held no free nor fair elections for half a century, imprisoned his political opponents after trials presided over by crony judges, completely controlled all the national media and installed his brother as his successor?

    The Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation documented more than 8,600 politically motivated detentions of government opponents and activists during the year. Despite that, the Guardian announced that ‘The revolutionary icon, one of the world’s best-known and most controversial leaders, survived countless US assassination attempts and premature obituaries, but in the end proved mortal.’ In its 11th paragraph it mentioned ‘concerns over human rights under the Castro regime,’ but only insofar as they were mentioned by Francois Hollande rather than the paper itself. Any reader would have been forgiven for thinking that Castro was ‘controversial’ not for his vicious dictatorship and use of torture but simply because the CIA didn’t like his Marxism-Leninism.

    The Telegraph, disgracefully for a conservative newspaper, also headlined their obituary ‘Revolutionary hero’ and stated ‘At home, he swept away capitalism and won support for bringing schools and hospitals to the poor. But he also created legions of enemies and critics, concentrated among Cuban exiles in Miami who fled his rule and saw him as a ruthless tyrant.’ That implies that the Cubans living in Cuba itself loved him for his healthcare and educational reforms rather than secretly hating him for keeping their island living in the 1960s.

    When I visited Cuba last year, I saw how everywhere outside Havana was stuck in an earlier technological generation, with donkeys and carts carrying people to work rather than buses, and oxen being used agriculturally instead of tractors. Doctors earned more moonlighting as tourist guides in their much-vaunted health system.

    Amnesty International – which the Guardian would take note of when describing a fascist dictatorship – stated in its 2015/16 Report on Cuba that despite all the efforts by President Obama to normalise relations with the Castro regimes, ‘Government critics continued to experience harassment, “acts of repudiation” (demonstrations led by government supporters with participation of state security officials), and politically motivated criminal prosecutions. Reports continued of government critics, including journalists and human rights activists, being routinely subjected to arbitrary arrests and short-term detention for exercising their rights to freedom of expression, association, assembly and movement.’

    Fidel Castro was a foul tyrant and his brother Raul is no better. Free Western media outlets ought to have said so right at the top of their news reports, instead of admitting it towards the end like some uncomfortable detail.

  • 2
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    How do we defend the independence of the state which is occupied and run by bourgeois ruling class linked to global and Chinese capital in unorthodox ways while worshipping neoliberal,free market economic doctrine? Shouldn’t the people in Sri Lanka free the state from this ruling class united in the name of yahapalanaya? What happened to the revolutionary spirit of our people? How should we rekindle it in the face of neoliberal globalisation and new forms of imperialism? Where are our intellectuals and left oriented political leaders when we are losing state sovereignty to multinational corporations and imperialist forces? Read my latest article in Social Affairs, Colombo,on academic dependency on Western Social Sciences to be released shortly for a glimpse of why our academics and intellectuals are what they are? Rather than worry about Fidel,they are busy working for international education outfits that dominate the world and pay handsome fees. Our green countryside will soon be concrete jungles with the so called mega developments conducted by both major parties. Our villages and village lifestyles that even colonialists could not eliminate and formed the backbone of small civilisation will become history in the near future. While we may learn lessons from Fidel and Cuba to fight modern imperialism, independence of the state and freedoms of the people cannot be secured with a corrupt political party system that promotes nepotism,mediocracy, duplicity, hegemony on one hand and promote a type of internal colonialism against the masses on the other by using misleading and anti racial rhetoric.

    • 1
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      Mr Gamage’s comment is a much better read than Dayan Jayatilleke’s carping article. He should expand his thoughts into an article.

      Fidel would have indeed been regarded as a great man by every one if after getting rid of Batista, he had ruled with the consent of the people. He blotted his copybook through repression.

      In any case, it is a bit of a joke that an obvious racist is touting himself as a socialist.

  • 7
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    Dayan note – “Capitalism is a catalyst for positive change.”

    Once upon a time of one of my late cousin’s was an active Samasajist and ace leftist. In the mid seventies he went to the Middle East, my God, all were stunted, after returning back with load of dough, he became ace capitalist, and in the front row of all UNP activities. When people see money and wealth all their socialisms and every thing fly through their roofs.

    By the way what happened to the birthplace of everything socialism and communism – Europe, especially eastern europe and Russia -, all finished and gone. The last remaining places, even in China, Vietnam and Laos people became more capitalists than the western capitalists but only the communist party is ruling and controlling the country. North Korea for that matter a brutal Dictatorship.

    How about the latest Hugo Chevas leftist and socialist experiment in Venezuela being a petroleum exporter with one of the largest oil reserves in the world, now people and the country are taken to the cleaners.

    Soon as Fidel’s funeral was over, and before Trumps inauguration for he is going to be hard on them, Raul and company is signing scores of agreements with American companies. They signed with Google for internet services and connectivities – their internet is one of the slowest and most expensive in the world, until the full infrastructure is built, Google going to set up their servers locally, and upload their contents. Same way they are letting scores of US airlines and cruise companies to have services to Cuba.

    Like all animals man is a free animal, no person, state, and party could rule or restrict his movement and freedom, and dictate terms to his free will and life. Its the root cause for the failure for the left, socialism and communism.

  • 4
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    “…One by Sri Lanka’s lead diplomat and cultural critic….”
    Not even a diplomat now, let alone a lead diplomat.But the ego won’t let you correct it.

    So you have found 1 white man out of a population of 320 million in the US who quotes you? A man who knows nothing about the fact that you have been a shameless toady of the Rajapaksas and an admirer of such illustrious thugs as Vladimir Putin, Douglas Devananda and Ramzan Kadyrov. Or that you bayed for blood in the Vanni and covered up war crimes by fellow Lankan thugs. How impressive!

    • 2
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      “But the ego won’t let you correct…”

      Are not each of us guilty of it to some degree?
      We notice it in some more than in others.

    • 1
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      Agnos: Why does Richard Falk being White matter to you? Dayan doesn’t appear to use Falk’s skin colour in his favour!

      • 0
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        Chithral,

        It is kind of relevant in the sense that Falk is most likely not aware of the background of DJ. There are many American citizens born in South Asia, just as or even more accomplished than Falk, who know all about the naked hypocrisy of DJ.

        • 2
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          Pretty amusing how you relate your guesswork (“most likely not aware”) to wriggle out of your imagination that Dayan expects us to be impressed because of the skin colour of the guy who has written a favourable comment on him.

          • 0
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            It was your imagination, not mine.

  • 0
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    (continued)
    In fairness to DJ, Falk is not just “1 white man out of a population of 320 million in the US”.
    He is a well acknowledge journalist and author of repute.
    To take pride in being cited by anyone may tell us something about DJ– but that is another matter.

    • 0
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      If Falk wants us to take him seriously as a journalist, he should have done some research on DJ’s background, rather than simply quoting his ‘cherished friend.’ In the current environment where Putin is reviled by Americans across party lines (except for the low-IQ idiots who support Trump), it is laughable for Falk to quote a lumpen Putinista to buttress his case.

      • 0
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        Do people who compliment (or insult) various individuals on these pages and elsewhere do so after serious research? I doubt.
        Many seem to have made up their minds in advance— or perhaps have their minds made up for them.

        My comment was on your lightly dismissing Falk as one of so many million Americans. To be cited by Falk is something that people have good reason to be pleased with, depending on where you stand in relation to issues of democratic and national rights.
        Falk cited DJ in a favourabe way, based on what he read. One could educate Falk on DJ if appropriate— I did that with Chomsky, whom I did not know personally, when he appeared to go very soft on the LTTE at one stage.
        But to dismiss Falk as irrelevant is, to me, not something proper.

        Elsewhere, yeas ago, I have said good things about DJ’s role in strengthening Sri Lankan relations with Left regimes in Latin America; that was no endorsement of his politics, but giving him his due for a contribution in a given context.

        On Putin, do you think that the Americans have been persuaded to revile him for good reason? If it for love of the Russians, how come that Yeltsin was adored?
        Putin is bad news to some because he stands up to the US where it matters, although he slipped up badly in Iraq and Libya— that was when he was loved too.

        • 0
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          Putin murdered his political opponents, as well as those who were exposing his corruption. That included the murder in daylight of an opposition leader as he was walking across a bridge, and another one by using radiation at a London restaurant.

          Yeltsin and his family had become utterly corrupt, and after making a deal with Putin to cover up their corruption, they engineered the apartment bombings in Russia and blamed it on Chechen rebels so that Putin could crush the insurgency and chest-thump as a great hero and Russian nationalist.

          Your assumption that American’s loved Yeltsin might have been true initially as he was taking over from Gorbachev and was thought to be a democrat. But not later.

          And the Rajapaksas copied Putin and not surprisingly DJ speaks approvingly of both.

          I don’t occupy a mush middle here; I consider people like DJ, Putin, Rajapaksa, et al as positively evil, deserving of unrelenting hostility.

          While I would be fine with the leftist policies of Bernie Sanders or some of the European socialists, unlike you, I would applaud it if someone decapitated Putin, DJ, the Rajapaksas or Assad; it would be a great service to humanity everywhere. And despite the messy way it was done, without adequate thought to the aftermath, I continue to applaud the decapitation of Saddam Hussein and Gaddhafi.

          I have been closely tuned into American politics for nearly 25 years and know quite a bit about the players, including Chomsky. Falk is relatively unknown to many, and is not taken seriously, except perhaps by the club of extreme and nutty left. And you seem to belong to the Lankan variety of it.

          • 0
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            My comment was about your light dismissal of Falk, owing to your spite for DJ. I can assure you that many more than you seem to think take Falk seriously, certainly outside the USA.

            The US media cabal works in tow with the ruling establishment and creates opinion among a people poorly informed of world events so that they are easily fooled into believing all manner of lies like WMD in Iraq and about events in Libya, Afghanistan and Iran.

            If you still “continue to applaud the decapitation of Saddam Hussein and Gaddhafi” and “would applaud it if someone decapitated Putin, DJ, the Rajapaksas or Assad” let us agree that we do not have much in common in our views of rights and wrongs. And you say that you are unlike me, which I gladly acknowledge.
            But kindly avoid imagining my views on various men and matters.

            I note gladly that you have not objected to my comments other than those pertaining to the preferences of the Americans.

            • 0
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              I just skip come points to conserve time; it doesn’t mean I am conceding your points.

              There is press freedom in the US even for the nutty left.
              That Bush and Cheney were wrong in asserting there was WMD in Iraq is something people in the US know. The NYT reporter Judith Miller who went along with their lies is a nobody now, so there is a self-correcting mechanism here, which you won’t find in Putin’s Russia or China.

              But as I said, I don’t occupy the mushy middle. Tyrants like Gadaffi and Saddam had to go one way or another; that same applies to Putin, Assad, Rajapaksas and other tyrants; that is what matters to me. Bye.

            • 0
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              Frankly, I was surprised that you skipped some points, as you do not usually miss anything of significance. Your not conceding anything should not trouble me as the key point concerned norms of conduct.

              Attacking China or Russia is poor defence of the consistent fooling of the public by the US state and mainstream media to enable the US to conduct its evil deeds unchallenged across the globe.

              Where one lands one’s self in the process of avoiding the ‘mushy middle’ is a matter of one’s choice, which I dare not challenge and, on a lighter note, not for fear of being put on the hit list comprising DJ, the Rajapakses et al.

              I think that it is time to “have a KitKat”

  • 1
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    What ever praise we utter on Fidel, his policies did not bring prosperity to the masses in Cuba!
    Communist principles do not bring prosperity,
    Capitalism and Free markets bring prosperity!
    USA and China are the best examples,
    (I guess it is not Cuba that gave you, your doctorate, It is Tax payers of America?)

    All other communist countries follow the West!

    Dayan, is it not time to forget about Fidel and write about the father of the free education in Sri Lanka as someone suggested here?

    Most of us are writing here thanks to him!

    I personally quite appreciate your intelligence, But please use your efforts to betterment of the country, Not to show off your knowledge!

  • 1
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    Asking Dayan to forget about Fidel and write about the father of the free education in Sri Lanka as someone suggested here – cant help him get forwards since there is no fans for DJ by today.

    He is what he is – like a metastacized cancer, we CANT hope him to grasp about the ground realities easily. That is the nature of some. He haddone some good work in 2009 but since then, his fall down was predictable. Today, he is like an invalid corin only being given a chance by Sirasa That is all.

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    “Uumaiyar sapaiyil uraruvaayan mahaavithuvaan”. (In the dumps'(-invalids’) meeting the Blah Blah guy is the PhD).

    There have to be a learned guy to write about Fedel. Nobody there. There thero de Silva is the PhD.

    This guy possessed for some time and Old Royals Lost. Then he moved to Castro. The man who would not die now dead. The man who was liviing for 90 years died.

    Castro was not defeated because he lived 90 years. But USSR was dismantled because Lenin, Stalin, Malenkov,Khrushchev,Brezhnev, Chernenko…… died and Gorbachev came to power.

    Do you know the streets in Cuba should not be named with dead Castro’s name? Only way to keep castro’s name alive is label with it the wine bottles Thero buys.

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