20 October, 2020

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Physical Threats To Journalists Remain A Problem In North And East: International Media Assessment Mission

An International Press Freedom Mission delegates today said they heard that while physical threats to journalists have diminished in the last four months it is important to address the high levels of impunity regarding the killing and disappearance of media workers, and physical threats remain a problem in the North and East of Sri Lanka where many journalists continue to feel at risk and insecure.

A mission of seven INGOs and IGOs working on media freedom recommended today a package of reforms in the post-election media environment of Sri Lanka.

Press freedom M SLThe mission which has been meeting with media, government and civil society stakeholders since 8 May, welcomed the positive changes made in the country since a new government came into power in January 2015.

“The mission found a considerably freer environment and a drop in the level of threats and intimidation that had become the norm under the Rajapakse government”, said Thomas Hughes, ARTICLE 19 executive director.

In meetings with various ministers, the government also showed a strong desire to reform controversial and restrictive laws that silence civil society and the media, including the Prevention of Terrorism Act. The proposed Right to Information Bill agreed by the cabinet is also close to being tabled before parliament.

“However, there’s a long way to go to reverse the decades of authoritarian rule that has impacted on the media in so many ways. ARTICLE 19 is looking forward to working with all stakeholders to take advantage of the will to protect the right to freedom of expression”, added Hughes.

A number of concerns remain. The legal framework for the media is far from adequate. There is no systematic regulation of the broadcast media and regulation of the print media is open to abuse. The broadcasters often do not reflect Sri Lankan society or its needs. Ownership has also become excessively politicised.

Despite the government’s commitment to investigate two of the most notorious cases of killed journalists, there remain numerous unresolved cases of attack and intimidation. In one media house visited, the mission discovered that not one of 40 attacks, including killings, have been investigated properly and openly, or the perpetrators brought to justice. The mission visited Jaffna, a city still recovering from being at the heart of the civil war, and was concerned to hear that journalists still feel like they are being watched and are at risk.

The mission made a series of nine recommendations to the government covering legal change, capacity building, and the reform of state media.

The mission also called for an independent Commission of Inquiry to investigate attacks on journalists and bring perpetrators to justice. The Prime Minister in the mission’s meeting with him supported the idea.

The mission comprised of ARTICLE 19, Centre for Law and Democracy (CLD), International Federation of Journalists (IFJ), International Media Support (IMS), Open Society Foundations (OSF) Program on Independent Journalism, South Asia Media Solidarity Network (SAMSN) and UNESCO, with support from the Sri Lanka Press Institute (SLPI).

We publish below the statement in full;

Joint Statement – International Media Assessment Mission to Sri Lanka -14 May 2015

The International Media Assessment Mission to Sri Lanka visited Sri Lanka from 8 to 14 May 2015 to assess the media freedom situation in the country, including Jaffna. The International Mission was represented by ARTICLE 19, Centre for Law and Democracy (CLD), International Federation of Journalists (IFJ), International Media Support (IMS), Open Society Foundations (OSF), South Asia Media Solidarity Network (SAMSN) and UNESCO, with support from Sri Lanka Press Institute (SLPI).

The International Mission welcomes the important positive changes in the environment for media freedom since the new government came into power on 8 January 2015. These include steps to end the climate of threats against and pressure on media outlets and journalists, the unblocking of websites, moves to provide legal protection for the right to information, an invitation to exiled journalists to return to Sri Lanka, and the allocation of relatively greater editorial freedom to the State media. The improvements were recognised and welcomed by a wide range of the stakeholders we met during the mission.

At the same time, as was acknowledged by the government leaders that we met during the mission – the Prime Minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, the Minister of Buddha Sasana, Public Administration, Provincial Councils, Local Government and Democratic Governance, Karu Jayasuriya, and the Minister of Mass Media and Information, Gayantha Karunathilaka – much needs to be done to ensure that the overall environment for the media respects international standards regarding the right to freedom of expression and provides a strong basis for the growth of a robust, diverse and professional media in Sri Lanka.

The Mission heard about excessive politicisation of much of the media – both private and State – and about the lack of editorial freedom experienced by both editors and working journalists. There is also a serious challenge in terms of professional standards in the media, with issues in terms of qualifications of journalists, the quality of academic training programmes and the availability of quality ongoing training opportunities for journalists. This is exacerbated by low wages and poor working conditions and benefits for many journalists, obstruction of the right to join trade unions, weak systems for promoting and supporting ethical standards, and ethnic divisions in the media, including instances of negative reporting and a culture of ‘communalism’. The Mission also heard that while physical threats to journalists have diminished in the last four months it is important to address the high levels of impunity regarding the killing and disappearance of media workers, and physical threats remain a problem in the North and East of Sri Lanka where many journalists continue to feel at risk and insecure.

These factors threaten to undermine seriously the ability of the media to perform its role as watchdog of government and powerful societal actors, and to inform the public. The International Mission is making the recommendations below with a view to assisting the government and other stakeholders in Sri Lanka to address these and other concerns. Implementation of these measures should only be undertaken after a broad consultative process which involves all interested stakeholders. We note that all of these proposals received support from the government leaders we met.

1. Comprehensive legislation on broadcasting should be adopted in line with international guarantees of freedom of expression. This should provide for, among other things, proper planning in relation to the frequencies allocated to broadcasting, including during the digital transition, an independent body to regulate broadcasting, a three-tier system of broadcasting which recognises public, commercial and community broadcasters, and obligations on broadcasters to be balanced and impartial in their coverage of politics and other matters of public concern.

2. The three State broadcasters – the Sri Lanka Rupavahini Corporation (SLRC), the Sri Lanka Broadcasting Corporation (SLBC) and the Independent Television Network (ITN) – should be transformed into independent public service broadcasters which enjoy editorial independence, have a clear mandate to serve the public and benefit from public funding which does not compromise their independence.

3. Measures should be taken to ensure that the State print media group – Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Limited (ANC) – is also able to operate independently of government and to enjoy editorial freedom. A broad public consultation should be held to determine the most appropriate way to do this.

4. A right to information law, giving individuals a right to access information held by public authorities and other bodies which are funded or controlled by public authorities, which is in line with international standards, should be adopted and then implemented properly.

5. An independent Commission of Inquiry should be created with a mandate and adequate powers to investigate past killings of, threats to, disappearances of and other attacks on journalists, media workers and media outlets, with a view to ensuring that those responsible are prosecuted and that appropriate compensation is paid to the victims and their families.

6. The Press Council Act should be repealed and the government-controlled Press Council should be abolished. Steps should be taken to ensure that there is an independent and effective system to address complaints regarding the professional conduct of both the print and broadcast sectors.

7. Media owners should recognise and support journalists’ and media workers’ right to form unions to negotiate and advocate on behalf of their members.

8. A broad, multi-stakeholder consultation should be held to identify needs in the area of professionalization of journalists and media workers, and this should be followed up by a series of concrete actions to deliver on those needs.

9. Civil and criminal law restrictions on media content should be reviewed so as to bring them into line with international standards regarding freedom of expression. Among other things, the Prevention of Terrorism Act should be repealed and replaced with carefully tailored legislation which strikes an appropriate balance between respecting freedom of expression and the need to address terrorism, and the rules on contempt of court should be codified through the adoption of legislation on this matter.

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Latest comments

  • 1
    0

    WTF? Under Yaha…ya?

  • 1
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    Nothing new to Tamils… When Chandrika was in power and took the sentry points and embargo off to Jaffna, the army officers and soldiers refused to take notice. “Madam can put orders there, but our orders are the orders here”, they openly told the bus and lorry drivers.

  • 0
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    Recommendation 3 needs immediate implementation:

    “3. Measures should be taken to ensure that the State print media group – Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Limited (ANC) – is also able to operate independently of government and to enjoy editorial freedom. A broad public consultation should be held to determine the most appropriate way to do this.”

    The Daily News editorials and features appear to be simply government propaganda. I see no semblance of editorial independence. In this sense, I see no difference between Rajapakse palanaya and Yahapalanaya.

    Immediate steps should be taken to heed the advice of the visiting experts.

  • 0
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    those international organisations are blind to the loss of media freedom in sri lanka. qualified and veteran respected editors of lakehouse such as Dinesh Weerawansa has been removed. weerawansa guided the paper during hon Mahinda rajapaksa period to new hight. few journalists can match him. veteran journalist turned bandula jayasekara is also sidelined by the new palanaya. sri lanka does not have journalists/diplomats/ statesman of the calibre of Bandula Jayasekara. he is the ideal man to restore freedom in state media.
    veteran sinhala journalists like Mahinda abeysundara, Hundson samarasinghe have also been removed their places. how can sri lankan media provide independent news to people. media freedom is dying under new governmrnt

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