29 September, 2020

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No Press Freedom In Sri Lanka; Colombo Telegraph Blockade Is One Of The Three Key Developments: Freedom House

Freedom on the Net 2014 – the fifth annual comprehensive study of internet freedom around the globe, covering developments in 65 countries that occurred between May 2013 and May 2014 –found three key issues regarding Sri Lanka’s internet freedom and named Sri Lanka’s “Press Freedom 2014 status” as “Not Free”.

MR08102012E_1According the report, published on Thursday by the US-based Freedom Housethe key developments in Sri Lanka between May 2013 – May 2014 are;

  • In March 2014, the information ministry formed a committee to regulate social media, shortly after President Rajapaksa dubbed them a “disease;” the scope of its activities remains unclear.
  • The Colombo Telegraph website was repeatedly inaccessible, continuing a trend of pressure on online news outlets.
  • Incidents of violence and harassment against internet users declined, though traditional journalists met with increased intimidation .

Targeted, politicized censorship continued throughout 2013 and 2014 with the website of the Colombo Telegraph periodically blocked, apparently because of its dissenting content and coverage of controversial political affairs in the country, the report noted.

Read the full report here

Related posts;

President Rajapaksa Phoned TRC Palpita To Ask Colombo Telegraph Blockade

Ranil Demands Rajapaksa Unblock Web Sites

TRC Head Palpita ‘Selective’ And ‘Inconsistent’

Dhanapala Steps Down From Dialog Board

Fears For Ad Revenue From Dialog Stops Sri Lankan Print Media From Taking Dhanapala Issue

Dhanapala Must Take A Stand And Resign From Dialog, Condemn Its Illegal, Unethical Behaviour – Kumar David

‘I Give Dhanapala The Benefit Of The Doubt’ Says Radhika

Calling Jayantha Dhanapala A Liar, Or The Tragedy Of Lankan Public Life

Swedish Govt. Appointee Dhanapala’s Unethical Behavior Embarrassment To The SIPRI

‘Dhanapala Must Choose’ Says Saravanamuttu

Picture Evidence: After Dhanapala Addressed BASL Meeting Dialog Blocked Colombo Telegraph Again

Unlawful Restrictions On Media By State Or Private Actors Is A Matter Of Serious Public Concern And Must Be Questioned – Bishop Chickera And Prof. Savitri

Dialog Unblocked Colombo Telegraph For Dhanapala To Address A Public Meeting

Jayantha Dhanapala Is A Liar; Caught Lying Over Silence On Colombo Telegraph Blocking

Jayaratne Says Dhanapala Will Stand By Best Practices, Dhanapala Pussyfoots On Illegal Web Blocking

International Press Institute Urges UN To Ensure Interference With Colombo Telegraph Ends

Colombo Telegraph Has Every Right To Raise Dhanapala’s Conflict Of Interest; Friday Forum Member Speaks Out

Article 19 Slams Ban On Colombo Telegraph Website

Dialog Board Director And Friday Forum Member Jayantha Dhanapala Fails To Stop CT Blockade On Dialog Network

Dhanapala May Be Influenced By Large Payment He Receives From Dialog – Professor Kumar David

‘Dhanapala’s Position Ethically Untenable’ Says Dr. Pradeep Jeganathan

Sara Says ‘Dhanapala – WebBlocking’ Issue Needs To Be Resolved Within The Framework Of Good Governance

Subtle Business Interests More Damaging Than Anti–Democratic Regime: Dhanapala Should Answer Conflict Of Interest Questions – Dr. Nirmal Ranjith

Sri Lanka Blocks Websites And The President Lies On Twitter

Once Again Colombo Telegraph Blocked; Dialog And Etisalat Tamper DNS Responses 

TRC Blocks Colombo Telegraph, Warns Service Providers To Maintain It’s A ‘Technical Glitch’

Colombo Telegraph Blocked, How To Reach Us Now: Sri Lanka Telecom And Mobitel Joins The DPI Club!

Sri Lankan Govt. Periodically Blocked Colombo Telegraph In 2013: US Human Rights Report

History of Colombo Telegraph blocking

First -December 26, 2011 – We are blocked but we will not be stopped

Second – May 8, 2012 – Colombo Telegraph Blocked Again

Third – March 29, 2013  – Sri Lanka Blocks Colombo Telegraph and Selected Tweets: Colombo Telegraph Unblocked

Fourth – August 23, 2013 – Colombo Telegraph Blocked, How To Reach Us Now: Sri Lanka Telecom And Mobitel Joins The DPI Club!

Other attempts 

October 26, 2012 – Colombo Telegraph Was Hacked

August 9, 2012 ColomboTelegraph Password Cracking Attempt Blocked

Freedom House Report: Freedom On The Net 2012, Sri Lanka Is A Country At Risk

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Latest comments

  • 5
    0

    No Press Freedom In Sri Lanka; Colombo Telegraph Blockade Is One Of The Three Key Developments: Freedom House

    That is precisely why the Common Sense Phamplet Sri Lanka 2014 should be written printed and distributed.

    Looks like the Sri Lankan writers of 2014 do not have the guts of American in 1776,

    Common Sense (pamphlet)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Sense_%28pamphlet%29

    Common Sense[1] is a pamphlet written by Thomas Paine in 1775–76 that inspired people in the Thirteen Colonies to declare and fight for independence from Great Britain in the summer of 1776. In clear, simple language it explained the advantages of and the need for immediate independence. It was published anonymously on January 10, 1776, at the beginning of the American Revolution and became an immediate sensation. It was sold and distributed widely and read aloud at taverns and meeting places. Washington had it read to all his troops, which at the time had surrounded the British army in Boston. In proportion to the population of the colonies at that time (2.5 million), it had the largest sale and circulation of any book published in American history.[2]

    Common Sense presented the American colonists with an argument for freedom from British rule at a time when the question of whether or not to seek independence was the central issue of the day. Paine wrote and reasoned in a style that common people understood. Forgoing the philosophical and Latin references used by Enlightenment era writers, he structured Common Sense as if it were a sermon, and relied on Biblical references to make his case to the people.[3] He connected independence with common dissenting Protestant beliefs as a means to present a distinctly American political identity.[4] Historian Gordon S. Wood described Common Sense as “the most incendiary and popular pamphlet of the entire revolutionary era”.[5]

  • 3
    0

    Although I condemn the blocking of ANY website, the blocking of CT is nothing compared to the total lies being broadcasts on STATE media (whatever that means) at least one hour a day, digested by the majority of the rural population. Now there you can compare the “democratic” republic Sri Lanka only with the worst place in the world: North Korea.

    It surprises me that nobody is expecting journalist from state media to crossover. Why not? They should receive a deadline: crossover or face charges after Jan 8.

  • 1
    2

    “Targeted, politicized censorship continued throughout 2013 and 2014 with the website of the Colombo Telegraph periodically blocked, apparently because of its dissenting content and coverage of controversial political affairs in the country, the report noted”

    This the same censorship CT is practicing when I have written and shown evidence of truth at many occasions.

  • 3
    0

    Banning of social media is done for political reasons in Srilanka and time is right to remove all these bans and give the public the opportunity to see different views as it is done with reduction of elecfricity, petrol and gas prices to please the public. Let me wish CT accordingly.

  • 5
    0

    Nothing scares this government other than the TRUTH. That is why CT was banned. The sentiments shared on CT are are from people for and against the government. That is true democracy. So CT should not be concerned about being banned. Thousands of people in Sri Lanka read CT almost 3 times a day accessing proxy servers to avoid the prying eyes of the Government.

    Carry on the good work and thanks for giving us a platform in this dictatorship. Just imagine if we had to listen to Rupavahini and ITN. We all would have ended up in Angoda.

  • 5
    0

    The Word FREEDOM is an allergic word to the Ruling Party of Sri Lanka.

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